• COVID-19 Effects on SEPTA

  • Discussion relating to Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority (Philadelphia Metro Area). Official web site can be found here: www.septa.com. Also including discussion related to the PATCO Speedline rapid transit operated by Delaware River Port Authority. Official web site can be found here: http://www.ridepatco.org/.
Discussion relating to Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority (Philadelphia Metro Area). Official web site can be found here: www.septa.com. Also including discussion related to the PATCO Speedline rapid transit operated by Delaware River Port Authority. Official web site can be found here: http://www.ridepatco.org/.

Moderator: AlexC

  by njtmnrrbuff
 
It will take time for many people to return to riding RRD. Even in better times, I wasn't a big fan anyway of having two RRD Lines ending in Chestnut Hill. Those two lines should have been light rail from the start.
  by ExCon90
 
From the start they were built by two competing railroad companies and powered by steam, which was accepted custom and practice for the time, well before 1900 and the development of electric traction. Over some decades the possibility of light rail has been considered but has always foundered on what to do about Center City access. Fox Chase might also be a good candidate for conversion to light rail, but the same problem of downtown access exists. I believe that at one time mention was made of converting two tracks of the Center City Commuter Connection to light rail, but that appears to be totally impractical. It seems that what we have is what we have.
  by octr202
 
While risking veering off topic, has there been any study done of whether CHW could be connected to the Broad St Line? The horizontal difference between the two lines is quite small, but of course there's the vertical (i.e., underground) issue. I'm sure it wouldn't be cheap, and would require taking some buildings to build, but would be interesting to see what the long term cost/benefit analysis of providing more frequent travel at lower operating cost, versus the capital expenditure to make the connection and conversion.

Aside from the expense of the connection, the line seems to be an easy conversion given that it's 100% grade separated (can't recall from memory if there's any pedestrian crossings at stations, but certainly no street crossings), now free of freight traffic, and even has some stations converted to high level platforms.

I suppose the other knock against the conversion would be the density along some stretches of the line - does this area of the city warrant rapid transit service versus others? Certainly in a world where capital funding is in question this is all pie-in-the-sky thinking.
  by AlexC
 
octr202 wrote: Wed Jan 27, 2021 8:50 am While risking veering off topic, has there been any study done of whether CHW could be connected to the Broad St Line? The horizontal difference between the two lines is quite small, but of course there's the vertical (i.e., underground) issue.
The original goal under the Vuchic plan was always to connect the CHW line to the CHE at Swampoodle - that obviously never happened.

More here:
* map-with-swampoodle-t65643.html
* swampoodle-connection-t82232.html
  by AlexC
 
https://www.inquirer.com/transportation ... 10126.html
With ridership down about 85% from pre-pandemic levels, SEPTA Regional Rail is essentially running empty trains, and it’s clear that many of its suburban riders won’t return to five-day-a-week schedules given the appeal of white-collar telework. To sustain and grow Regional Rail ridership, transportation experts say, it should try to appeal to those it hasn’t in the past because of pricey fares and less frequent service. That was true before COVID-19 but may be more necessary now than ever, with the identity of Regional Rail turned on its head.
  by JimBoylan
 
ExCon90 wrote: Tue Jan 26, 2021 10:29 pmFrom the start they were built by two competing railroad companies and powered by steam, which was accepted custom and practice for the time, well before 1900 and the development of electric traction.
Actually, the Reading line between 9th & Green Sts. and Germantown Ave. & Price St. started out with horse power. Does that qualify it as Light Rail? When it 1st got a steam locomotive, the horses were still used in bad weather.
  by ExCon90
 
Now that you mention it, its beginnings as a horse-drawn operation might grandfather it as a light-rail line. It's a start, especially as "temporary" substitutions of service are not unprecedented in Philadelphia ...
  by zebrasepta
 
SEPTA is gonna reopen the CHW line
SEPTA Regional Rail’s Chestnut Hill West Line, one of two lines suspended in COVID-19 schedule changes last spring, will return with some service in March, general manager Leslie S. Richards said Thursday.
https://www.inquirer.com/transportation ... 10128.html
  by ryan92084
 
Not surprised, Paoli-Thorndale ridership doesn't seem to be increasing like other lines are starting to. Too many workers with the types of jobs that can still stay home and no colleges.
  by MACTRAXX
 
RCT: You mean Chestnut Hill WEST is back - limited to weekdays only after a one-year shutdown.
I also noticed the increase in service on the Wilmington-Newark Line. Not only is there more service to NRK
all trains operate into Delaware - nothing originates or terminates at Marcus Hook.

Everyone: I give SEPTA credit for making schedule folder PDFs available as well alongside printed timetables.
As an example the LIRR in the past year no longer offers any printed copies of branch line timetables.
LIRR timetables are only available in PDF form. Thankfully SEPTA realizes that some riders still would
rather have a folded print copy of schedules - count me among them - instead of having to rely on
mobile devices and/or PDFs to access RRD schedule information.

I remember the mention about public transportation that there is a percentage of riders that do prefer to
use traditional printed schedules - and these people tended to be older or have lower incomes primarily.

MACTRAXX