Discussion relating to the operations of MTA MetroNorth Railroad including west of Hudson operations and discussion of CtDOT sponsored rail operations such as Shore Line East and the Springfield to New Haven Hartford Line

Moderators: GirlOnTheTrain, nomis, FL9AC, Jeff Smith

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  by Jeff Smith
 
Just curious, and we have a parallel thread on this, but has there been any discussion on leasing replacement equipment and/or operating shuttle service for equipment restricted below CP1?
  by Otto Vondrak
 
Jeff Smith wrote:Just curious, and we have a parallel thread on this, but has there been any discussion on leasing replacement equipment and/or operating shuttle service for equipment restricted below CP1?
Shuttles = Additional Crews
  by RearOfSignal
 
I'm not sure there is that much equipment just laying around that would fit MNR's requirements that it would make a significant difference. MNR's mechanical department does not have the time to modify foreign rail cars to MNR specs with all of the MNR equipment that is in the yards awaiting repair.
  by Jeff Smith
 
Oh well. I guess there's always buses.
  by brettj22
 
On another thread it was noted that NJT has "surplus" ALP-44's and Comet III coaches. Elsewhere I had read that the Comet III's didn't have crashworthy cab cars. Could that be solved by placing a ALP on both ends of the train? Is there anything else that would preclude the leasing of this equipment from NJT and using it on New Haven service?
  by MNCRR9000
 
I know that this is a long shot but would it be possible to borrow some equipment from Amtrak. Not sure how many extra coaches or engines they have laying around. I'm thinking that with the equipment that Amtrak has if it runs on the Northeast Corridor then it probably meets Metro North's specifications but then again that is only speculation.
  by RearOfSignal
 
I'm pretty sure everything that goes over the New Haven portion of the NEC would fit MNR, except for the electric locomotives into GCT. But if you have to get off at New Rochelle just to get on to another crowded train to get into GCT, then what's the point?
  by Jeff Smith
 
Less miles travelled per M-2 could mean a quicker turnaround (shuttling only GCT to NR if third rail clearance is an issue and if not 153rd? instead of complete trips). A quicker turnaround (cutting off say an hour or two round trip from the outer zones) would mean that train could have one or two more runs in that time. So the Stamford express using non-GCT equipment (or take your pick of any peak trip or express) runs to NR instead of GCT, turns back around to pick up more outer-zone passengers. The M-2 runs the shorter distance GCT to NR. Board them on the outbound tracks, use inbound for OP service.
  by MNCRR9000
 
TCurtin wrote:
kaitoku wrote:coverage from the Gray Lady:

Metro-North Cuts Service on the New Haven Line

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/02/nyreg ... h.html?hpw
I read that article then went to the Metro North web site, and no new timetable is out yet
I just looked at the MTA website and it appears that they posted the new reduced service schedule which is effective February 7th through March 4th. It is going to be interesting if they extend that March 4th date.

Links:
http://www.mta.info/mnr/html/planning/s ... edules.htm
  by MNCRR9000
 
This message was recently posted on the MTA website regarding New Haven Line Service.
To Our New Haven Line Customers

The extreme winter weather’s repeated pummeling of the region has had a devastating impact on our New Haven Line.

Significant car shortages due to record-breaking amounts of snow and extreme cold have forced us to operate all our trains with fewer than scheduled cars. We have also had to cancel trains which exacerbate the problem and reduce the reliability of your commute.

The situation is dire. On a daily basis, there are close to 150 (40%) cars out of service on the New Haven Line. Our employees are working around-the-clock to get damaged equipment back into service. However, with each new weather event, more weather-damaged cars arrive in our shops in need of repair. The service we have been providing has been far less than what you have come to expect from us and we strive to provide you. It is time for us to take additional steps to improve our reliability.

The problems with our fleet created by its age—almost 70 percent of our electric fleet is over 40 years old—and the unprecedented winter weather are numerous. The cars were designed in a manner that made key components extremely vulnerable to snow. These components include:

* Traction motors, which must be repaired or replaced – a job that routinely takes six or more hours to complete.
* Brakes, which freeze and get stuck from the extreme cold.
* Doors, which won’t close properly because the snow and ice that gets inside the door pockets prevents them from opening or closing on command.

Further complicating our efforts is the fact that shop space is limited. Our employees do not let this limitation stop them, working outside the shops, crawling under cars in the snow and extreme cold to repair components. The work is demanding, and progress is slow and hard won. Every day repaired equipment goes into service, and every day more weather damaged cars arrive in need of repair.

Crews have also focused their efforts on removing snow from pantographs on top of rail cars, digging out our rail yards, and clearing snow and ice from track switches.

Another factor working against us is the line’s aging infrastructure. A significant portion of the catenary on the New Haven Line is over 100 years old. Further, we currently have tracks out of service to replace this system, which severely limits our operating flexibility and creates additional delays. And the line’s equally old movable bridges tend not to move as well when impacted by the cold and snow.
http://www.mta.info/news/stories/?story=186
  by R36 Combine Coach
 
Jeez again? 70% of the electric fleet over 40 year old? When will they ever learn basic math? First M-2s are not even 39.
  by Clean Cab
 
Obviously no M2 is 40. They date from 1972 (built date) to 1976. The oldest pair (8400-8401) will be 39 in June.
  by R36 Combine Coach
 
The first were delivered April 1972, about a full year prior to regular service. 8402-03 were the first MTA pairs in service, along with ConnDOT's 8500-09 in April 1973.
  by Noel Weaver
 
R36 Combine Coach wrote:The first were delivered April 1972, about a full year prior to regular service. 8402-03 were the first MTA pairs in service, along with ConnDOT's 8500-09 in April 1973.
The M-2's were not delivered until their burn in test runs were satisfactorily completed. They were on the property for a considerable period of time (months in this case) before acceptence especially the earliest ones in this case. Before acceptance they were still owned by GE.
Noel Weaver
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