• Amtrak ACS-64 Sprinter Discussion

  • Discussion related to Amtrak also known as the National Railroad Passenger Corp.
Discussion related to Amtrak also known as the National Railroad Passenger Corp.

Moderators: GirlOnTheTrain, mtuandrew, Tadman

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  by gokeefe
 
I guess my question would be about effects of lost contact and surges on the transformers. Sure the arcing stabilizes the current but if there are frequent (but extremely brief) power surges then what effect does that have on the transformer? Does the transformer even have enough time to completely discharge all current and then recharge? Perhaps it does given that there is arcing taking place ...
  by rvlch
 
gokeefe wrote: Sat Apr 18, 2020 9:14 pm I was thinking about that and wondering if perhaps rough track conditions create momentary surges in the electrical systems onboard.
It would seem to this speculator that if vibration is the culprit cause the effect would more likely be unanticipated levels of mechanical stress impacting transformer internals, either electrical connections or mechanical structures.
  by gokeefe
 
I was wondering about vibration in that sense as well but given the damping actions of the suspension I found to really hard to believe that it would be severe enough to cause problems all by itself. Combined with electrical surges on the other hand seemed more realistic.
  by Martin Baumann
 
Are 601 and 627 permanently retired?
  by STrRedWolf
 
Martin Baumann wrote: Thu Sep 17, 2020 8:59 am Are 601 and 627 permanently retired?
Given that they were in accidents? Yes.
  by gokeefe
 
Says a lot about the punch that cantenary fed electric traction can pack ...

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  by typesix
 
GE E-60 had a peak of 10,000 hp from 0 to 30 mph and 6000 hp continuous, according to Trains with GE supplied info. The GG1 had a peak of 8,000- 9,000 peak hp according to various sources. When the AEM-7 started to be used, it was noted in at least one Trains article that the GG1 could accelerate an equivalent size train faster because of its higher peak hp during acceleration.
  by mtuandrew
 
And the EMD GM10B had 10,000 hp on tap. Only one was ever built though, and it was scrapped in the early 1980s when Conrail shut off their electric lines.

EDIT: but you’re right in that the ACS-64 is the most powerful four-axle locomotive ever on American rails.
  by west point
 
If you think that arcing is benign --. Had a VHF radio aabout 5 miles away and the arcing would cause a brief static on the radio sounding much like a welder . Viewing the flash and static was simulstantenously..
  by gokeefe
 

mtuandrew wrote:EDIT: but you’re right in that the ACS-64 is the most powerful four-axle locomotive ever on American rails.
This begs the question of how this is being done ... Are they making better use of available current or are they drawing more current?

I'm guessing they are probably just more efficient but I have to wonder if Siemens just built a unit that found a better way to draw max amps at all load levels within NEC system tolerances.

I suppose this is a question of efficiency in propulsion (traction motors and power supply components) vs. efficiency in electrical supply (power supply components and power management software).



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  by Marcop23
 
typesix wrote: Fri Sep 18, 2020 8:55 am GE E-60 had a peak of 10,000 hp from 0 to 30 mph and 6000 hp continuous, according to Trains with GE supplied info.
Interestingly, a ACS-64 will probably have a much lower horsepower rating at low speeds, since the power is limited by the maximum adhesion below ~45 mph. Therefore, the 6.4 MW can only be reached going 45 mph or faster.

The E-60 was much heavier, almost twice the weight, resulting in a higher maximum adhesion.
  by gokeefe
 
Nice to remember that lighter isn't always better!

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