• This air tank is a pipe bomb!

  • Discussion of General Electric locomotive technology. Current official information can be found here: www.getransportation.com.
Discussion of General Electric locomotive technology. Current official information can be found here: www.getransportation.com.

Moderators: AMTK84, MEC407

  by amtrakhogger
 
That reservoir rupture buckled the frame! That unit might be totaled!

  by Jtgshu
 
Wow, thats amazing!!!

Aren't there vent valves that are designed to blow before that happens? And if the vent valve failed, aren't there pretty much fail safe pressure holes drilled in the tanks?

  by thebigc
 
You guys are quick! I was all set to post that pic. I remember someone in a forum somewhere here alluding to over-pressure ruptures in those GE tanks. This would be right at head level for me if I was walking alongside of that unit! Sobering.

http://67.15.20.45/images/images2/6/658.jpg.31293.jpg

  by conrail_engineer
 
Jtgshu wrote:Wow, thats amazing!!!

Aren't there vent valves that are designed to blow before that happens? And if the vent valve failed, aren't there pretty much fail safe pressure holes drilled in the tanks?
The air pump is supposed to cut out at 140 lbs (that GE has an electric air pump). If the cutout fails, valving behind the pump is supposed to pop off at 160 lbs...and there are many CSX units that do in fact charge all the time with the relief valve hissing...

I believe the spitter valve is supposed to blow if all else fails, as well.

I have to wonder if the failure was due to tank corrosion. If the unit were MU'd up, other units would have had their systems popping off in case of catastrophic air system overpressure failure...

Did you know CSX wants us to put SALT down on locomotive walkways in winter? What do you suppose that salt DOES on a metal structure, with metal hardware and fixtures?

  by EDM5970
 
There was a thread awhile ago about GE using air tanks made of aluminum, and having problems with them. As far as the frame being buckled, I've seen an Alco that was cornered, and the damage was to what is pretty much a supplemental frame that held up the running boards and air tanks. The center sill, under the engine, is the main frame member, and most likely suffered minor damage in this one, if any. It looks like it is worse than it is.

There is a safety valve, which is supposed to open at maybe 150 PSI, and should be of large enough capacity to prevent something like this. That valve is supposed to be inspected and tested annually, per FRA regulations. I'm wondering if it had water in it and froze, although it should be at a high point in the system and not fill with water. Just speculation. Hopefully no one was hurt.

  by trainiac
 
The walkway is buckled, but it would take far, far more force (a high speed collision with another train, for instance) to even bend the main frame. That's mostly cosmetic damage. However, it's a pretty spectacular occurance nonetheless!
  by Bryanjones
 
amtrakhogger wrote:That reservoir rupture buckled the frame! That unit might be totaled!
that is not the main frame of the locomotive that is damaged but a side sill which provides the walkway. The locomotive is far from totalled and will be repaired. This type of damage is seen quite often on units that have rolled onto one side or the other or units which have been involved in a sideswipe.

Bryan Jones
Brooks,KY

  by Allen Hazen
 
Do we know the actual history? From the looks of the air tank remains (unrolled and flattened), I'd guess that air pressure had something to do with it (but I have NO expertise in such matters!), but do we know if air tank failure was the original cause? (Alternative: some sort of collision/sideswipe that ruptured the tank as well as distorting walkway and hood doors and roof.)

  by GOLDEN-ARM