• Rumford Branch, RUPO / PORU

  • Guilford Rail System changed its name to Pan Am Railways in 2006. Discussion relating to the current operations of the Boston & Maine, the Maine Central, and the Springfield Terminal railroads (as well as the Delaware & Hudson while it was under Guilford control until 1988). Official site can be found here: PANAMRAILWAYS.COM.
Guilford Rail System changed its name to Pan Am Railways in 2006. Discussion relating to the current operations of the Boston & Maine, the Maine Central, and the Springfield Terminal railroads (as well as the Delaware & Hudson while it was under Guilford control until 1988). Official site can be found here: PANAMRAILWAYS.COM.

Moderator: MEC407

  by gokeefe
 
KSmitty wrote:It made quite a splash when announced, but the last I knew the Verso/New Page deal was in trouble as Verso was having trouble raising funds. So, after a long spell of quiet it appears there is some news. http://investor.versopaper.com/released ... eID=817170" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false; More than news, it appears the deal went through and will close this year.

I sincerely hope this brings better fortunes to Verso, Rumford, Jay, Bucksport and the 2 branches in existence for the Verso mills.
I am on the fence whether or not this is good for Rumford. Could spell the end for them. As my friend always says, "When they sell the hydro its lights out." NewPage did just that with their hydro assets in Rumford. Not sure what kind of a position that puts the mill in.
  by CN9634
 
Rumor is shut down Bucksport mill, keep just the electrical generation going and consolidate resources/people at Rumford and Jay.
  by gokeefe
 
CN9634 wrote:Rumor is shut down Bucksport mill, keep just the electrical generation going and consolidate resources/people at Rumford and Jay.
Interesting concept/idea especially since Bucksport is the newer of the three if I'm not mistaken.
  by S1f3432
 
The mill at Bucksport was opened in 1930 by Seaboard Paper Company, a subsidiary of CMP to use electricity from the recently completed
Wyman Dam. It was purchased by Time, Inc. in 1946 who contracted St. Regis Paper to operate it; St. Regis purchased the mill in 1947.
IP's Androscoggin Mill in Jay opened in 1965. Papermaking in Rumford dates to the 1890's.
  by KSmitty
 
More than age, I thought Bucksport made newsprint type paper, while Rumford made magazine type shiny paper?
  by Mikejf
 
Received word of a couple of washouts toward Rumford from yesterdays storm. One possibly near Smith Crossing, though I forget where that is.
  by MEC407
 
PAR had a derailment in Rumford today:

https://twitter.com/WCSH6/status/487726357699653633" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
  by KSmitty
 
https://www.facebook.com/WGME13/photos/ ... =1&fref=nf" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Nother view

I also love the comments on the FB page. A derailment in Rumford is OBVIOUSLY the reason "The Amtrak" has been stuck in OOB all day! As we all know, the shortest route from Portland to Boston is a trip to Rumford. :wink: Now if the comment had been with the piece about the Lawrence derailment...
  by MEC407
 
Video from WCSH-6:

http://www.wcsh6.com/story/news/local/2 ... /12559159/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
  by newpylong
 
For the life of me I can't understand how the bean counters in Billerica have come to the conclusion that picking derailment up after derailment is cheaper than routine maintenance.
  by KSmitty
 
77 was second out on the Waterville wreck train. They were westbnd in Monmouth around 1 on Saturday. I assume this is Rumford bound. Depending on the condition of the north wye leg at Leeds, 77 will either lead on the way up the branch (wye OOS, requiring run around) or lead on the way back to Waterville (wye in service, requiring run around in Rumford.

I was otherwise occupied and couldn't chase, but depending on whats going on tomorrow I might venture out to see if I can spot anything.
  by gokeefe
 
newpylong wrote:For the life of me I can't understand how the bean counters in Billerica have come to the conclusion that picking derailment up after derailment is cheaper than routine maintenance.
Millions vs. thousands. Also, depreciation would be an issue with new installations. Another problem are concerns regarding the long term viability of Maine's paper mills. My impression is that there simply isn't enough certainty to commit beyond what is already being done. It makes the Rumford Branch a good candidate for a state sponsored rehabilitation. The state could make the commitment and has an interest in keeping the mills healthy. The mills need more reliable rail service and improvements in that area could help them continue to commit to Maine.
  by newpylong
 
gokeefe wrote:
newpylong wrote:For the life of me I can't understand how the bean counters in Billerica have come to the conclusion that picking derailment up after derailment is cheaper than routine maintenance.
Millions vs. thousands. Also, depreciation would be an issue with new installations. Another problem are concerns regarding the long term viability of Maine's paper mills. My impression is that there simply isn't enough certainty to commit beyond what is already being done. It makes the Rumford Branch a good candidate for a state sponsored rehabilitation. The state could make the commitment and has an interest in keeping the mills healthy. The mills need more reliable rail service and improvements in that area could help them continue to commit to Maine.
They spent millions on re-railing and paying for the cars and laden that were destroyed just in the years I worked there, let alone since then. It once again comes down to business tactics that this RR and only this RR seems to have.
  by QB 52.32
 
Newpylong, you continue to try and find guilty Pan Am's "bean counters" in your court of axe-grinding emotion. Do you know for a fact that the cause of this derailment was because of a lack of "routine maintenance"? Do you really think the calculus for the "bean counters" is your simplistic assertion that they've determined that "picking up derailment after derailment is cheaper than routine maintenance"?

I think that the "bean counters" calculus is closer to trying to meet many needs with limited resources. Unless there's a big injection of money from some outside source, you don't just turn a New England railroad on a dime. It seems to me that Pan Am is investing in their railroad and with some of the needs pressing to support traffic growth (which is a good thing, no?). And, it's not like other New England carriers haven't had their share of problems in the past few years, either.

I can only wonder what your emotional state toward the "bean counters" might have been if you had witnesed New England railroading's darkest days of the late '60's and early '70's when the B&M, NYC/PC and even the P&W were wracking 'em up pretty good all over the place and frequently, destroying lading left and right.
  by NHV 669
 
hey, it beats dumping a few Boeings in the water
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