• How much of a GE locomotive is built at Erie, PA?

  • Discussion of General Electric locomotive technology. Current official information can be found here: www.getransportation.com.
Discussion of General Electric locomotive technology. Current official information can be found here: www.getransportation.com.

Moderators: AMTK84, MEC407

  by ALCOGG1
 
How much of a GE is actually built in Erie, Pa? How much is contracted out ? Do they have a foundry at the plant? What is the biggest parts they would have to cast these days for a locomotive? Many steam loco parts could not be cast these days just because they are not foundries big enough to handle the castings.

  by DutchRailnut
 
other than trucks , there are hardly any castings left. The engine is manufactured and so is frame.

  by GEVO
 
DutchRailnut wrote:other than trucks , there are hardly any castings left. The engine is manufactured and so is frame.
The diesel engine is almost all cast on a GE locomotive. EMD makes their engine frames from welded together plates but a GE is cast. FDL, HDL, or EVO, all have cast frames. Most all of the parts bolted to it are also cast. Water pumps, oil pumps, heads, cylinders, strongbacks, airbodies, turbos, cams, crank, ect, all cast. Trouble is, the US EPA has driven most casting manf out of business so most of those castings come from out of the country.

The majority of the locomotive parts are made in Erie. Final assembly is also located there. As with any modern global business, they do farm out some work. But their current employment is at the highest level it has been in years and most of the work is still done there. In addition to the Locomotives, the Erie plant makes parts for the Wind and OHV industries. The diesel engine comes from their satellite plant in Grove City.

The 16 cylinder EVO or HDL engine frame would be the largest casting needed. So that would be about 13-14' long. (rough guess)

There was an article on the Erie plant in the Popular Mechanics January 2006 issue, Future Train.

Also an interesting program with some good recent (2006) Erie video on the History Channel called Modern Marvels: Freight Trains

And one more. Although made back in 1996, this video from PCN Tours features final assembly at the Erie plant. Is it a little dated to how they do things today but still an interesting viewing.