• Ferrocarril Central Andino

  • Discussion about railroad topics everywhere outside of North America.
Discussion about railroad topics everywhere outside of North America.

Moderators: Komachi, David Benton

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  by David Benton
 
Even in the 1990's the Shining Path ere restricted to a small part of the mountains, I think Huncayo was the center of their influence. It was not advisable to take a bus from Lima to Cusco through Huncayo (may have even been banned for tourists ), but you could take a bus along the coastand and up to Arequipa, then a train from Arequipa up to Juliaca , change to train to Cusco.
  by philipmartin
 
I'm glad that people are no longer being terrorized by the Maoists.
  by george matthews
 
philipmartin wrote:I'm glad that people are no longer being terrorized by the Maoists.
They haven't gone away. (As they proverbially say in Ireland).
  by Benny
 
SIXTH CHAPTER
The Ferrocarril Central Andino is a real masterpiece of engineering. To tell only one thing: the gradient; the Callao-Lima urban agglomerate is a continuous slope passing from the sea level of the port area to the more than 400m asl of the north-eastern districts of the capital but is only after Chosica that the line start to climb very hard. In this photo taken in Cocachacra you can see the gradient, and this is not the worst one, in some places this can be more than 40mm per meter.
D71r Linea in pendenza a Cocachacra.jpg
50 miles from the start and at an altitude of more than 1500m there is the smart station of San Bartolome, in a place named appropriately Tornamesa, that means turntable. Here trains invert the loco position and restart their journey. Being in the middle of nowhere this is an open installation and warden are generally fair with railfans. Loco 1027, a GE C30M-3, is heading a westbound mineral train entering in S. Bartolome station. Note the slopes up and downhill.
D55r Loco 1027+merci in arrivo a S.jpg
Switching can take a long time because the station tracks are shorter than trains and the loco needs to be turned. Generally these locos are restricted to the peacks stretch to maximise their use because of fault of clearance of SD40-2s.
D64r Loco 1027 in manovra a S.jpg
It will continue....

Ciao :wink:
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  by philipmartin
 
The logos on these two locomotives, FCCA and Conrail look similar.
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  by NorthWest
 
Henry Posner's Railroad Development Corporation has adopted a modified Conrail Can Opener logo for their locomotives.

FCCA's C39-8s are even more similar:
http://www.railpictures.net/viewphoto.p ... 172&nseq=5

Benny, it is somewhat odd that the JT26CW-2Bs are being retired while the GR12s live on, but I suppose switching is easier with a G12.
  by philipmartin
 
NorthWest wrote:Henry Posner's Railroad Development Corporation has adopted a modified Conrail Can Opener logo for their locomotives..
We liked to think of it as a broken wheel, but Conrail Can Opener is just as good a name for it.
Rugged mountain territory that train is going through. I wonder if the loco needs a spark arrestor?
  by Benny
 
When, in 1999, the Ferrocarril Central was privatized, the franchise was gained by Juan de Olaechea y Cia, a Peruvian company using the commercial name of Ferrovias Central Andino with shares owned by Mitsui (financing and leasing), Buenaventura (a Peruvian mining company), Inversiones Andinos (I think a financing lessor), ADR inversiones (an investment company) and RDC (the Ed Burkhard's company). As RDC is the only one with real railway experience I think that it imposed his proper logo. I heared something about this theme at time of RDC franchise in Estonia and about Rail Polska (all with the same corporate livery). The fact that this logo is really similar to the Conrail one has to be explained by U.S. railfans. But really it is a can opener.
About JT26CW-2Bs what I imagine is that the bi-cabins are more than double powered against a GR12 so there can be economical reasons; I saw images of another GR 12 in original condition doing a photographic freight 4 years ago but I don't know if this one is still in service or 801 is the last operating one.
I saw also various shots of locos with backfires (especially into the mountains because of bad ignition due to the fault of oxygen) but never heard about fires in the territory caused by railroad nor the use of spark arresters.

Ciao :wink:
  by philipmartin
 
Here's a link to a Wiki article on the Ferrocarril Central Andino. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ferrocarr ... ral_Andino" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
The article says " in July 1999 the government awarded a consortium led by Railroad Development Corporation (RDC) of Pittsburgh, USA, a concession to operate the former Ferrocarril del Centro for 30 years." Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, was in the middle of Conrail territory. That might be reason for the logo.
Here's a video. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GSopsfkQGg8" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Scenery anybody?
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  by philipmartin
 
Benny wrote: I heard something about this theme at time of RDC franchise in Estonia and about Rail Polska (all with the same corporate livery). "But really it is a can opener." A global can opener, if it's in Peru, Estonia and Poland. We have a saying about opening a can of worms; (not a good thing to do.) I'm not suggesting that's what RDC does: I know nothing about RDC. To most North American railfans, RDC stands for "rail diesel car," built for many years by the Budd company of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The bottom picture is of a pair of Budd RDCs, in the past, working for Via Rail, on Vancouver Island, British Columbia. Photo by Alasdair McLellan .

"I saw also various shots of locos with backfires (especially into the mountains because of bad ignition due to the fault of oxygen) but never heard about fires in the territory caused by railroad nor the use of spark arresters."
I've had personal experience (as a towerman) with a diesel with fire coming out the exhaust stack, when under load, shooting sparks into the air, starting numerous fires along the right of way.

Ciao :wink:
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  by Benny
 
Ok, probably, being not English-speaking native, I cannot explain myself very well. When I wrote about the can opener my idea was only to confirm the NorthWest nickname for this logo and reporting memories about the ventures in Eastern Europe was only about logos and colours; I'm not interested in questioning what Rail Development Corporation done or is doing.
For better informs about Rail Development Corporation you can see http://www.rrdc.com/operating_html;" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false; the Spanish language version of FCCA Wikipedia article is far more complete against the English one if you can read it.
And, speaking of fire from the stack, I referred only to the Ferrocarril Central and my little knowledge of it. I experienced various times railside fires started from sparks emitted by steam locos, even with arrester in the stack.
The Canadian flag on the side of the railcars is, coincidentally, very similar to the Peru one and, at first sight, I was thinking at second hand units for a direct service.
I don't know north-American railroad slang. What is a towerman? Is he the man that moves points from a control center?

Ciao :wink:
  by NorthWest
 
I think it is just because Henry Posner III likes it, but I don't know for certain.

The C39-8s are known for stack fires. In North America, the primary cause is a failed turbocharger which fails to pull in enough oxygen to fully combust the fuel. The fuel then hits the hot turbocharger and ignites. I can see how a lack of oxygen to begin with would result in a similar flame display.

Your English is fine, and a lot better than my basic Spanish.
  by philipmartin
 
Benny wrote:Ok, probably, being not English-speaking native, I cannot explain myself very well. When I wrote about the can opener my idea was only to confirm the NorthWest nickname for this logo and reporting memories about the ventures in Eastern Europe was only about logos and colours; I'm not interested in questioning what Rail Development Corporation done or is doing.
For better informs about Rail Development Corporation you can see http://www.rrdc.com/operating_html;" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false; the Spanish language version of FCCA Wikipedia article is far more complete against the English one if you can read it.
And, speaking of fire from the stack, I referred only to the Ferrocarril Central and my little knowledge of it. I experienced various times railside fires started from sparks emitted by steam locos, even with arrester in the stack.
The Canadian flag on the side of the railcars is, coincidentally, very similar to the Peru one and, at first sight, I was thinking at second hand units for a direct service.
I don't know north-American railroad slang. What is a towerman? Is he the man that moves points from a control center?

Ciao :wink:
I agree that your English is fine, Benny, and my Spanish, meager; even though it was my Venezuelan grandmother's native language. She was married to a Peruvian, by the way.
I'll see if I can get the Spanish FCCA Wiki article and translate it to Ingles.
I wasn't aware that steam engines were prone to starting wayside fires, and also didn't know what caused it in diesels, I just presumed that it was a defective or missing spark arrestor.
I hope the Peruvian flag doesn't have an orange maple leaf in the middle of it. Apologies to my Canadian friends, but I much prefer the former Canadian flag.
A tower is what they call a signal box in the UK. A towerman or block operator, (term held over from the days when they were telegraph operators,) does move points and display signals for the plant in front of him, under the direction of a train dispatcher. These days, in North America, most towers have been done away with, their function performed directly by the dispatcher, who may be hundreds of miles away.
Top photo: standard design small Pennsylvania RR tower. I worked this one from 1960 to '64, and in 1972 for a few months until it closed. By the time this picture was taken (1972?) the strong arm rods had been removed and replaced by a hand switch and hand throw derail.
Bottom photo: a signal box on the Great Western Railway, UK. Note the dual gauge track; standard gauge? and seven foot gauge. Photo by Rev. A.H. Malan. Also, one of the strong arm rods for moving points or displaying signals is visible on the ground.
Adios amigos!
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  by Benny
 
Thank you for your explanations and opinions.
In the last copy of I Treni (the most reliable Italian railways magazine) there is a good feature about the biggest trains control center in Italy. If you are interested in it I can ask to the editor (that is a my old friend) permission to translate it and make a new topic about the item.
As a curiosity towerman is translated in Italian as "deviatore", professional figure in decline there too.

Ciao :wink:
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