• EMD SD80MAC and SD90MAC series official thread

  • Discussion of Electro-Motive locomotive products and technology, past and present. Official web site can be found here: http://www.emdiesels.com/.
Discussion of Electro-Motive locomotive products and technology, past and present. Official web site can be found here: http://www.emdiesels.com/.

Moderator: GOLDEN-ARM

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  by Nelson Bay
 
UPRR engineer wrote: What RR department did you work in, if ya dont mind me asking.
I don't mind you asking.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Were you a track worker Nelson? No.

  by UPRR engineer
 
Signal department? Hats off to you buddy if thats the right answer. Every guy ive ever talked to is a working son of a gun. Good bunch of guys here on the UP. If im not right my next guess would be car department. I would say those two because they sometimes get upset when things get torn up.

  by Nelson Bay
 
UPRR engineer wrote:Signal department? Hats off to you buddy if thats the right answer. Every guy ive ever talked to is a working son of a gun. Good bunch of guys here on the UP. If im not right my next guess would be car department. I would say those two because they sometimes get upset when things get torn up.
Signals...no

Car dept.... no

I get the feeling I'm causing you a bout of paronoia. You seem obsesssed with who I am and what I do/have done. Do you feel I'm looking over your shoulder?

I don't get upset just because things get torn up.... I get concerned when railroaders, good ones such as you, put their livliehoods in jeopardy. You do this when you break/bend the rules. You can do you job and abide by the rules so why chance it and screw up your career and subject yourself and your co-workers to possible injury?

Back to the " cool fusee trick ".. be careful with that one. Don't your operating rules specify the number of times a locomotive can be restarted after a shutdown? If you're on a newer model unit the on-board computer can identify you as the villian if you exceed the limit. The archives log date, time, frequency, reason during shutdowns and the number of restarts. Even if you don't cause equipment damage you could get nailed for rules violations if you are deemed to be a PITA.

Just trying to help you pal- I don't want to run into you while you're working at a convenience store in Green River.

  by UPRR engineer
 
OK, when you come across like that i listen more, thanks buddy. I dont want be pumping gas.

  by BlackDog
 
nickleinonen wrote:
it was an sd40 maybe? [i still don't know model numbers - cn5333]
I just had a meet the other day with the 5333 north, it is an SD40.

  by slchub
 
UPRR,

Log into TCS via the internet. Once there, browse to Departments, then operating, then Mechanical, then Technical Resources. I have read the formula to get the access code for the new SD70ACe's, which uses the date coverted to a different number using by adding the whole date together and getting a two digit number and converting said numbers into the code in order to gain access to the mechanical portion of our new computer screens.

Like the other gentleman said, Mr. Goodwrench no doubt would like us to remain out of that area, but you asked, and I gave. Look around, we have some great info. about our eqpt. that we never get anywhere else, HEU/EOT's, radio's, etc.

  by UPRR engineer
 
Thanks buddy, never knew that stuff was in there. I havent found the page yet that tells you how to figure the code, but thanks for pointing me in the right direction.
  by MEC407
 
Not long ago, somebody said that CSX or NS (or perhaps both of them) would be replacing the 20-cyl engines in their SD80MACs with a 16-cyl, effectively creative an SD70MAC or 75MAC or something like that. I can't remember whether I saw that on LocoNotes or on here, but I definitely remember seeing it. I was just wondering if that has happened or if either of the railroads plan on actually doing it. I would assume that, at this point, they would have to install a new Tier II engine because it would be considered a full rebuild or overhaul. The resulting locomotive would be something like an SD70ACe in that case.

  by TerryC
 
This sounds interesting, but destructive. This would also mean getting rid of a rare prime mover. I think the only money Norfolk Southern is going to spend on these units is for paint, repairs, and maintenance.

keep searching keep finding
1929th member to join this forum
Last edited by TerryC on Mon Jul 11, 2005 8:31 pm, edited 1 time in total.

  by ANDY117
 
But a very interesting looking SD70ACe at that! i know NS replaced the horns on a few of theirs with K5LAR's to get rid of the old S3L's they came with.

  by byte
 
I think this was being done moreso on a basis of which engines actually needed prime movers. If a prime mover had a catastrophic failure that would result in spending more money on repairing it than getting a new one, they'd just get a new 16-cylinder version and put it under the hood, probably because it just costs less and while it's not as powerful as a 20, it's still up to par with the newer locomotives on the system.
  by Steve F45
 
I was looking at EMD's website and just trying to compare the two new sd70's they have and can't really see much difference between the 2. Same HP, so why would lets say NS buy most of the SD70M-2's compared to the BNSF/UP/MRL/CSX buying the SD70ACe's?

  by mp15ac
 
1. Cost. The SD70ACe is more expensive than the SD70M-2.

2. AC vs DC traction motors. The reason for the price differential is that the SD70ACe has AC traction motors while the SD70M-2 has DC traction motors. The AC setup is more desireable for heavy tonnage applications. If the railroad is using the locomotives for fast freight, where tonnage isn;t an issue, then they will tend to go with DC motors. Also, both CN and NS are fairly conservative regarding motive power, and haven't felt a need for AC motored locomotives.

Stuart

  by Steve F45
 
I didn't know there were dc and ac motors. Learned something new today.

Is there any difference in the getup and go factor? does one get moving better then the other if they have an equal train to pull in terms of weight and same track conditions?

  by trainiac
 
Is there any difference in the getup and go factor? does one get moving better then the other if they have an equal train to pull in terms of weight and same track conditions?
The main difference would be at low speed. According to the EMD website, the SD70ACe has 17% more starting tractive effort and 39% more continuous tractive effort than the SD70M-2. However, keep in mind that this is at very low speed, and that in those conditions the AC motors have a major advantage. At higher speeds (I'm guessing anything above 25 mph or so) the advantage of the AC motors would be smaller, and it's horsepower that comes into play. Since both models have the same horsepower, I'd assume their higher-speed performance would be similar.

So... The SD70ACe would be able to start and move a heavier train, but there would be little or no difference between the two on a hot-shot Intermodal train. That's why many roads use DC units in mixed freight and Intermodal service and AC units on coal drags.
Also, both CN and NS are fairly conservative regarding motive power, and haven't felt a need for AC motored locomotives.
I think in CN's case it's more because they have a lot of flat track than because they are conservative in their motive power. After all, they're the ones who pioneered ditch lights, the wide-nosed cab and the Draper-taper carbody. Of course, their recent SD70M-2's were built to NS specs, so I could be wrong... :wink:
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