• S2 206 in its final resting place

  • Discussion related to New York, Susquehanna & Western operations past and present. Also includes some discussion related to Deleware Otsego owned and operated shortlines. Official web site can be found here: NYSW.COM.
Discussion related to New York, Susquehanna & Western operations past and present. Also includes some discussion related to Deleware Otsego owned and operated shortlines. Official web site can be found here: NYSW.COM.

Moderators: GOLDEN-ARM, NJ Vike

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  by airman00
 
Couldn't you just do like a rebuilt engine and only replace the needed parts? I also thought a train engine had like 3-4 seperate diesel engines, so if one failed the others could still run the engine, just not as fast. I know that 206 is just a switcher, but I thought it'd have maybe 2 diesel engines? (instead of one big one)
  by cjvrr
 
airman,

Most mainline diesel locomotives have only one engine or prime mover connected to an electric generator. The larger the locomotive, the larger the diesel engine. The Also S-2 only had one diesel engine. This unit is about 70 years old as most Alco S-2 models. Finding parts in good condition is becoming harder to do and more costly to purchase. THe best bet would be to transplant a good engine from another unit. But since there is no immediate need to place the engine into service, why spend the dollars to repair the engine to just have it sit in Maywood? In my opinion they are better off giving it a cosmetic restoration to stablize the unit. Perhaps an opportunity will arise in the future that will permit it's repair and the work done now will allow the unit to survive until that time.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ALCO_S-2


However there are some exceptions....the Union Pacific Centennials were two diesel locomotives under one long hood. They still keep one in operating condition, but all others have been scrapped or stuffed for display. Some smaller switch engines, like the General Electric 44 tonners did have two small diesel engines (one under each hood) which allowed them to run one or both engines, depending upon need. Some of the newer "green" switch engine also use multiple diesel engines that will run based upon need.


airman00 wrote:Couldn't you just do like a rebuilt engine and only replace the needed parts? I also thought a train engine had like 3-4 seperate diesel engines, so if one failed the others could still run the engine, just not as fast. I know that 206 is just a switcher, but I thought it'd have maybe 2 diesel engines? (instead of one big one)
  by airman00
 
Hey thanks, that interesting I didn't know that. One other question, does anyone know how many Alco s-2's are still in service today?
  by NYSW3000
 
Also you would have to consider the time and effort it would take to rebuild the locomotive to running order. Also where would they run it besides the Bel - Del ? At least its not scraped like the other susquehanna S2s
  by jadebullet2
 
Hmmm. I know of another Susie Q S2 that is sitting on a siding. It is in Wellsbourough, PA. I think that the Tioga Central railroad owns it now. It isn't running, but it looks to be in alright shape.
  by lvrr325
 
You mean Wellsboro?

TC has one or two ex-NYS&W RS1s also.
  by cjvrr
 
Just a quick update on the engine's status.

We stopped at the Maywood Station for lunch while on the Volunteer Railroaders Association speeder trip this past weekend.

The engine is now painted in the silver scheme with maroon stripe. Ed was painting the handrails on the engine when we got there. It looked real nice.

Chris
  by airman00
 
Hey I know I asked this before, but just to put it out there, is there ANY chance we'll ever see 206 run again? Or is it really the end.
  by lvrr325
 
If you have an extra I dunno... $150K or so to restore it.. then you can probably see it run again.
  by oibu
 
So did 206 ever actually wear the single-stripe scheme taht it's been "restored" to. I've never seen a single pic of it painted as such. In fact I was pretty shocked to see that it's not painted in the full maroon and silver scheme anymore.
  by scottychaos
 
jadebullet2 wrote:Hmmm. I know of another Susie Q S2 that is sitting on a siding. It is in Wellsbourough, PA. I think that the Tioga Central railroad owns it now. It isn't running, but it looks to be in alright shape.
lvrr325 wrote:You mean Wellsboro?

TC has one or two ex-NYS&W RS1s also.
206 is the only surviving NYSW Alco S2..
Tioga Central has a NYSW RS1 (number 240 ) but not a NYSW S2..
the S2 on the Tioga Central was originally Buffalo Creek #46.

NYSW all-time roster and surviving locomotives:
http://gold.mylargescale.com/Scottychaos/susquehanna/

Scot
  by airman00
 
boy #206 looks great all cleaned up! It's still a shame nobody can get her running again. Why can't a big corporation that makes engines, restore her? (Kinda like giving to charity) Perhaps even there could be like a tax credit for restoring a historial peice of equipment. In fact, is they any sort of historical grant from gov't that could be gotten? Anything to stop her from being permanetly sidelined forever.
  by airman00
 
The reason I bring all that up that is that I saw a video on you tube, of say 4-5 guys (give or take), who spent months working on an old alco s-2. (similiar to 206) And the engine hadn't run in 25 years, and after a lot of work they got her running again.

This appeared to be guys doing it on the side not in an engine shop, and it didn't appear they replaced the prime mover, just repaired it. These guys knew what they were doing. I'm just wondering if something like that or something similiar could be done with #206. And try to keep her as original as possible.
  by scottychaos
 
well..the problem with 206 (and 95% of all preserved locomotives) is that even if it *could* be restored to operating condition, there would be no where to run it! :wink:

very few museum/display locos have the opportunity to run, even if they could..
there just arent enough museums with their own track..

We will just have to be grateful 206 exists at all..even if it wont run.

Its like the UP Big Boys and PRR GG1's..
they have two major problems that will prevent them from (probably) ever operating again..
1. The cost and parts needed to return the loco to operating condition.
2. No where to actually run it if it was restored!

For NYSW 206, #1 might not be a big deal..but #2 is..

Scot
  by airman00
 
scottychaos wrote:well..the problem with 206 (and 95% of all preserved locomotives) is that even if it *could* be restored to operating condition, there would be no where to run it! :wink:

very few museum/display locos have the opportunity to run, even if they could..
there just arent enough museums with their own track..

We will just have to be grateful 206 exists at all..even if it wont run.

Its like the UP Big Boys and PRR GG1's..
they have two major problems that will prevent them from (probably) ever operating again..
1. The cost and parts needed to return the loco to operating condition.
2. No where to actually run it if it was restored!

For NYSW 206, #1 might not be a big deal..but #2 is..

Scot
Well, looking at the current track that #206 is on, you could easily make a long siding for #206 to then connect onto the main line. (there is room for a nice long siding there) Secondly, you could then run excursions on the NYS&W main line. After all passenger service is being considered for that line. You could run also down what's left of lodi branch line as well. Any other branch lines are a place to run as well. I know it doesn't sound like much, but a small 20-30 minute ride say in the caboose with #206 leading would be like a tourist attraction. Besides I'm sure there are some sights along the line and if not... at least for railfans a chance to see some of the different sidings and whatnot. You could charge a small fee say $5 a person and that money would go to maintanence costs.

I agree with all your points, but who here wouldn't love to have a ride in a train pulled by old #206! :-)
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