• Japanese Hybrid and Freight EMUs...

  • Discussion about railroad topics everywhere outside of North America.
Discussion about railroad topics everywhere outside of North America.

Moderators: Komachi, David Benton

  by Komachi
 
Good news, everyone!

I'm always saying "Hey guys," so I thought I'd quote good ol' prof. Farnsworth this time around.


I posted this on the "Self Propelled Railcar" thread, but thought you guys would get a kick out of it too. Not to be done by Toyota and the Prius, the East Japan Railway Company (JR East) is currently developing a Hybrid EMU. Here's a link from the Japan Railway and Transport Review article below.

http://www.jrtr.net/jrtr36/pdf/photo.pdf

(Note: it's a PDF file, so you need Adobe Acrobat to read it)


Also, there's an article about a new type of EMU container train JR Freight is developing for use on the Tokyo - Osaka line (I believe they're talking about the Tokaido Line, but there's another one that runs between Tokyo and Osaka just to the north of the Tokaido).

Thought it would be an interesting pair of items to share.

  by george matthews
 
Also, there's an article about a new type of EMU container train JR Freight is developing for use on the Tokyo - Osaka line (I believe they're talking about the Tokaido Line, but there's another one that runs between Tokyo and Osaka just to the north of the Tokaido).
That sounds like the Freight EMU used in Germany.

Such a concept is also being proposed for use in Britain, using a Special Purpose Vehicle.

  by David Benton
 
in a October 2002 issue of "rail " ( english magazine ) , there was an article on the Minimodal system . 2.55metre square boxes , that could be loaded from passenger platforms etc in England .
Did anything ever come of that idea ? .
Ever since ive been following rail etc , theres been proposals for small container trains , with different loading systems etc ,, to make them intermodal . None seem to have really taken off .
I guess this is an area where rail is struggling to compete with rail , and its more political / marketing that is the problem .
Perhaps with enviromental considerations etc been taken more seriously in Japan , this has a chance of working .

  by george matthews
 
David Benton wrote:
in a October 2002 issue of "rail " ( english magazine ) , there was an article on the Minimodal system . 2.55metre square boxes , that could be loaded from passenger platforms etc in England .

Did anything ever come of that idea ? .

Ever since ive been following rail etc , theres been proposals for small container trains , with different loading systems etc ,, to make them intermodal . None seem to have really taken off .

I guess this is an area where rail is struggling to compete with rail , and its more political / marketing that is the problem .

Perhaps with enviromental considerations etc been taken more seriously in Japan , this has a chance of working .
Maybe today's news of an increase in the rate of increase of CO2 content of the atmosphere may concentrate minds.

It is Rail magazine that is my main source of information. It is helpful to make loading and unloading easier. Also to allow the use of branchlines.

  by David Benton
 
looks like a short distance container operation will be set up in auckland , New Zealand . distance would only be about 20 km
a similar train to discussed above would be ideal , ( diesel version ) , but is probably unlikely . more likely it will be a couple of ordinary locos , one on each end of a rake of container wagons .
i would love to see soemthing like the Japanese prosal at work on a route like this . too show how efficent it can be , and compete more effectively with trucks .
http://www.nzherald.co.nz/business/busi ... n=shipping
  by Komachi
 
DMU version of the container train? I would think that if TR (or whomever would be aquiring the equipment) wanted one, the company that supplied JR with its EMU container train could probably modify an electric set with diesel engines if so desired.

Although, I would look at the proposed profitability of the line and see if stringing cantenary and investing in the electric equipment would be a viable option (especially since the power units can also carry containers as well... you're looking at 2-4 extra containers per trip).

Well, that's my 2 yen.

  by David Benton
 
the lines they will run on will be electrified eventually for commuter rail anyway . however im not sure theyd want cantenary in the yards and unloading areas . i wonder how the japanese are getting around that one ? lide oad only , youd still need high cantenary to provide safe working clearances .
  by Komachi
 
David,

That is a good question. Unfortunately, I don't know the answer to that. I know the port authority in Akita City had a private (municipal?) railway that handled the movement of containers around the port of Tsuchizaki. The railway utilizes the German built JR diesel locomotives to do the work of switching (shunting) container cars around the piers/docks in the port. I would think that the EMU trains running between Osaka and Tokyo would also be shunted around the container areas as well, with the electric power units being used only for the runs between the two cities.

Will ask BillN about that (he's over there right now).

  by BillN
 
David and Komachi,
That is a good question. I have seen plenty of container trains, but did not think about how they handle loading and unloading. I do get the impression that most are loaded and unloading from the side using forklifts vice from above.
When I get time, will skulk about Yokohama and Kawasaki with my camera.

BillN

P.S. The typhoon blew down quite a few trees, but not really a big deal.
There is however one immutable law about the earthquakes. They only happen when I am looking at a train magazine in the "reading room".