• GE Q Cab Units

  • Discussion of General Electric locomotive technology. Current official information can be found here: www.getransportation.com.
Discussion of General Electric locomotive technology. Current official information can be found here: www.getransportation.com.

Moderators: AMTK84, MEC407

  by Centurylover68
 
I read about CSX engines with a larger cab made for CSX with a Q designation for Quarters. Iwas wondering if anyone had photos or info?

  by TerryC
 
Info sure!! All 10 were built in August to September 1978 and were numbered Seaboard Coast Line 5130-5139. In 1986 all became CSX 3000-3009 and were converted into B units before being retired in 1995-1996. All 10 were scrapped. Three were painted in CSX colors. 3003, 3008, and 3009.
http://www.railpictures.net/viewphoto.php?id=8492
http://www.trainweb.org/csxphotos/photo ... CSX-bc.jpg
http://www.railpictures.net/viewphoto.php?id=112220
http://www.trainweb.org/csxphotos/photo ... 8CSX-b.jpg
http://www.railpictures.net/viewphoto.php?id=111951
http://www.trainweb.org/csxphotos/photo ... 9CSX-g.jpg
http://www.rrpicturearchives.net/locoList.aspx?mid=235
http://www.railpictures.net/showphotos. ... E%20BQ23-7
My "Field Guide to Modern Diesel Locomotives" says the BQ23-7 were bought by the SCL and rrpicturearchives.net says the locomotives were bought by the SBD.

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  by ACLfan
 
TerryC:

The "Field Guide" is correct, as the Seaboard System did not become an operating entity until December 29, 1982, and was created through the merger of the SCL and L&N.

The use of "Seaboard" relative to the Seaboard Air Line, Seaboard Coast Line and the Seaboard System has caused a lot of confusion and misunderstanding, especially since their creations occurred within a rather short period of time. They were a sequence of individual organizations that were separate corporate entities. The sequence continued with the merger of the Seaboard System and the Chessie System into the CSX Transportation Company, which continues as of the present time.

To add to the confusion was the use of the marketing gimmick of "The Family Lines" in terms of logo, paint scheme and marketing. However, "The Family Lines" did not exist as a separate organizational and legal entity for the purpose of acquiring and operating the assets of the SCL or the L&N. Instead, it could be described as a marketing concept to underscore the close working relationships between the various individual railroads that were included within "The Family Lines" umbrella, and how these close operating relationships could offer significant economic benefits to customers.

ACLfan

  by Centurylover68
 
Thanks a lot! I read something on them and wanted to know more.

  by Centurylover68
 
Now what was the purpose of the Q cab exactly?

  by TerryC
 
So all BQ23-7s were owned by SBD, then SCL, and then CSXT? What does SBD stand for. The Q or Quarters cab was meant to hold a 5 person crew since cabooses were being phased out in the late 1970s and early 1980s. the is the same concept employed by EMD's GP50L.
http://www.railpictures.net/viewphoto.php?id=94551
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  by MEC407
 
That's what Guilford was trying to accomplish when they built this thing:

http://naphotos.nerail.org/showpic/?200 ... 716142.jpg

  by ACLfan
 
TerryC:

Read my post above. The sequence was as follows:

ACL + SAL = SCL

SCL + L&N = SBD (Seaboard System)

SBD (Seaboard System) + Chessie System = CSXT


ACLfan

  by TerryC
 
ACLfan, I did read, but It was a bit too confusing for me to decipher. Your latest post helps a lot. Thank you.

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  by Allen Hazen
 
I can't now remember the exact chronology, but the B23-7Q was -- I think-- built at a time when most U.S. freight trains still had cabooses, but the prospect of running cabooseless trains was much on the minds of railroad management: so, housing more train crew on the locomotive was seen as desirable. Some EMD GP50 built at about the same time (for, I think, BN) also had enlarged cabs for the same purpose, though it isn't as visible on them because the short hood wasn't entirely eliminated.
The B23-7Q came under immediate and intense criticism from (if nobody else) the operating unions: I've never felt sure whether they had identified genuine and important safety issues with the design, or whether they were attacking it because of the larger changes (cabooseless trains, and maybe ultimately smaller crews) that it was seen as heralding.
As originally built, the units had a small window on the front sheet of the cab, below the main windows (??to provide a view of who was on the front platform? or of the ground immediately in front of the coupler???): this was plated over almost immediately in response to union safety concerns. but this wasn't enough to save them. Their demotion to B-unit status was (I assume) because crews were unwilling to ride them (and perhaps wanted them OFFICIALLY banned from lead-unit status so dispatchers couldn't "accidentally-on purpose" forget and put them in the lead).