• Wiscasset, Waterville & Farmington Railway (WW&F) Discussion

  • Pertaining to all railroading subjects, past and present, in New England
Pertaining to all railroading subjects, past and present, in New England

Moderators: MEC407, NHN503

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  by elecuyer
 
Photo Event Announced: 8/31/2021 - Steaming Together: Arrivals and Departures

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The Wiscasset, Waterville and Farmington Railway Museum, Maine Narrow Gauge Railroad Co. & Museum, and Maine Locomotive & Machine Works are pleased to announce "Steaming Together: Arrivals and Departures" a photo event on July 31st with all 3 operating 2ft steam locomotives pulling authentic trains on the WW&F.

If demand warrants, a second date will be added on Sunday 8/1/2021.

Get your tickets and view the full event details at
https://fareharbor.com/embeds/book/wwfr ... low=420374

We also do plan on running all 3 locomotives together at the WW&F Annual Picnic (8/7/2021) for those not interested in an all day photo event.

These will be the last events at WW&F before 7 heads back to Portland for the busy fall and Christmas season.
  by Manalishi
 
I don't collect the WW&F but I found this postcard at a show. I liked it, it was inexpensive so I bought it. Anyone know if that bridge is still there?
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  by elecuyer
 
Anyone know if that bridge is still there?
No, it washed away shortly after the railroad closed in 1933.
The abutments are still there, and reportedly are in good condition.
  by Ridgefielder
 
Is that the Sheepscot River?
Last edited by MEC407 on Wed Apr 28, 2021 3:06 pm, edited 1 time in total. Reason: unnecessary quoting
  by MRY
 
Not really that weird when you consider the time period that it was built. It was probably transported to the site with horse and wagon and erected entirely by hand. All of the tension members are cable. The compression members could even be wood.
  by elecuyer
 
The WW&F's "Iron Bridge" in Whitefield over the Sheepscot River was actually purchased USED from the Maine Central RR. If I recall correctly, it originally was in Farmington. Too light for the growing weights of standard gauge locomotives, it was perfect for the WW&F - and is a great reminder of why a 2ft gauge railroad can be constructed at a quarter of the cost of a standard gauge road.
  by Manalishi
 
elecuyer wrote: Tue Apr 27, 2021 9:04 pm
Anyone know if that bridge is still there?
No, it washed away shortly after the railroad closed in 1933.
The abutments are still there, and reportedly are in good condition.
Boy, washed away? In order to wash away the bridge, that river would have to rise 20 feet higher than its level in the photo. Whatever year that was, the spring runoff must have been ferocious!
  by BandA
 
The horizontals & verticals look stronger than the diagonals. It just looks different than other railroad bridges which usually had I-beams. Guess it was strong enough for what they needed!
  by woodeen
 
Boy, washed away? In order to wash away the bridge, that river would have to rise 20 feet higher than its level in the photo. Whatever year that was, the spring runoff must have been ferocious!
It is often the debris that gets jammed under the bridge and accumulates that takes out the structure.
  by gokeefe
 
BandA wrote:That's a weird looking bridge!
It was probably 1870s vintage +/-. Potentially original installation when the railroad was built. Most of what we see today in Maine is early 20th century.

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