• Will They Ever Return?

  • This forum will be for issues that don't belong specifically to one NYC area transit agency, but several. For instance, intra-MTA proposals or MTA-wide issues, which may involve both Metro-North Railroad (MNRR) and the Long Island Railroad (LIRR). Other intra-agency examples: through running such as the now discontinued MNRR-NJT Meadowlands special. Topics which only concern one operating agency should remain in their respective forums.
This forum will be for issues that don't belong specifically to one NYC area transit agency, but several. For instance, intra-MTA proposals or MTA-wide issues, which may involve both Metro-North Railroad (MNRR) and the Long Island Railroad (LIRR). Other intra-agency examples: through running such as the now discontinued MNRR-NJT Meadowlands special. Topics which only concern one operating agency should remain in their respective forums.

Moderators: GirlOnTheTrain, nomis, FL9AC, Jeff Smith

  by lensovet
 
If you're going into the office three days a week, why pay for a monthly?

Someone taking Amtrak from Philly or Jersey is only looking at $360/mo. Good luck finding parking for less that, never mind tolls and wear and tear on your car. NJT and MTA also both offer 20% discounted tickets that are good for a limited amount of time. So I'm not sure where this "high commuter ticket" story is coming from.
  by photobug56
 
It's still not cheap - but for people paid well enough with a tax advantage, there's an incentive to drive. BUT - a good way to help fix that, is congestion pricing. Also, getting competent management for MTA - however impossible that may seem. All kidding aside, we should have a true regional transit agency that understands that anyone living in its area of coverage could end up working anywhere else in the area, and that the agency needs to make that viable.
  by Defiant
 
photobug56 wrote: Fri Aug 12, 2022 6:54 pm Lots of companies still offer (IRS allowed) pre tax payment of parking expense. Given how high commuter tickets are, plus subway, this may be a great deal for some people.
I am not so sure. If you add up parking costs, bridge & tunnel tolls, high gas prices, wear and tear on the car, especially in traffic, then driving to Manhattan becomes less and less attractive.
In addition, when a person is taking a train or bus, they can relax, nap or check on their office e-mail. All they can do when driving is to be always alert to avoid making mistakes...
  by photobug56
 
No one trusts the subway lately, and lirr passengers hate lirr. If driving is affordable they drive.
  by mkm4
 
lensovet wrote: Fri Aug 12, 2022 10:06 pm If you're going into the office three days a week, why pay for a monthly?
On LIRR/MNCR if you are commuting more than twice a week, every week, a monthly ticket is the cheapest option.
  by lensovet
 
mkm4 wrote: Mon Aug 15, 2022 7:50 am
lensovet wrote: Fri Aug 12, 2022 10:06 pm If you're going into the office three days a week, why pay for a monthly?
On LIRR/MNCR if you are commuting more than twice a week, every week, a monthly ticket is the cheapest option.
That’s a cheap monthly ticket, so I guess my original point remains — this is still cheaper than driving and parking.
  by photobug56
 
Even when adding a commuter ticket, whether monthly or the multi trip, plus subway, plus LIRR station parking is cheaper than driving in, driving can be more attractive. No fellow passengers screaming, dumping coffee on you or the floor, no sharing their COVID or flu, no constant breakdowns on subway or train, less hassle from the weather. Also, with a car, you don't have the Can't get there from Here syndrome. The policy objectives need to alter this. So better trains and schedules that are a lot more reliable, connections between regions, fixing up and making stations accessible. Plus the issue of - why the h-ll would I want to commute (most of the time at least) if I can save 2 - 5 hours per day with WFH? Why would I want to have to badly overpay for 2 to 3 meals per day in Manhattan? Why would I want to exchange hours sleeping for commuting? And how does it benefit my employer for me to be in a crowded, noisy low productivity office?
  by Gilbert B Norman
 
Discussion relating to Chicago area RTO and impact on the rail transit system has developed here:

alstom-coradia-multilevel-coaches-t172537.html

It's "on topic".
  by lensovet
 
photobug56 wrote: Mon Aug 15, 2022 7:31 pm No fellow passengers screaming, dumping coffee on you or the floor, no sharing their COVID or flu, no constant breakdowns on subway or train, less hassle from the weather.
Christ, when was the last time you actually took a commuter train?

Dumping coffee on you? Really?
  by photobug56
 
I don't like stepping in it either.
  by lensovet
 
When was the last time you rode a commuter train in the NY Metro?
  by photobug56
 
Why, are they suddenly clean, comfortable and reliable? Does the return of the m3s improve things? Are all those problem emails fake? Has the average speed in diesel country surpassed 30 mph?
  by lensovet
 
I can't speak for LIRR, but I hope you realize that not everyone who commutes into Manhattan comes from LIRR territory.

And yes, I have not had issues in the 2 months I've been coming in 2 days a week. Certainly beats driving for 2 hours each way.
  by photobug56
 
2 hours driving each way would be crazy - but to get from where I am on Long Island would take 3 to 4 hours round trip (unless you go very early) to get to say, White Plains. BUT - currently, by LIRR and subway, about 6 hours round trip, though likely about 5 hours if ESA actually opens and doesn't break down. By me, LIRR trains (with transfers) to / from the Pitts of Penn average 30 to 40 mph, then for most jobs I've had over the years take up to an extra half an hour with subway and walking. I used to use the M4 bus to go from Penn up Madison, until TA moved the start / end point to a mid block a long walk on crowded sidewalks from Penn. Q32 does it - but with a long wait between buses.

On LIRR, my inbox gets filled daily with switch, signal and train problems - and that's just for my branch. LIRR and Amtrak's repairs in Penn and the East River tunnels still allow piles of breakdowns, the diesel junk is awful - not enough of it, especially DM's, and what they do have is unreliable. The C3 cars - many seats slope down and out, so you have to brace yourself with your knees against the hard backs of the seats in front. The arm rests dig into your arms - the cushions are fake. The headrests are even worse. And inbound, the only time trains were reasonably on time was when they had to cut way back on access to Penn while they rebuilt the switches - it meant a lot fewer trains in the tunnels (which are crumbling post Sandy).

The subway service at Penn, especially IRT, is, well, unpredictable. I'd be downstairs, and the boards would say next train is express, so I'd rush up, and a local would pull in, and no express for 20 minutes. Etc. The elevators were urine soaked, if they were working. And these days I can't climb steps well.

LIRR is known to many as the Long Island Fail / Snail / Hell Road, etc. My nickname for IRT - Intermittent Rickety Transit. Etc.

About 20 years ago I spent some time working in London. As old as much of their system is, it was far better, though the escalators were iffy. The Jubilee Line extension was excellent, and the now, opening in stages Elizabeth Line is amazing - and all stations have glass platform walls and real time camera systems that actually work and are monitored around the clock. In contrast, even new subway stations here like on the 2nd Ave Stubway and 7th Ave extension have neither. Everything in mass transit in our area has mostly gotten worse over the years, piles of waste and corruption and incompetence, with LIRR leading the way in that regard, Metro North close behind. And NJT was run into the ground by Christie.
  by lensovet
 
Lots of text, but still haven't answered the question of when was the last time you used the system.
  • 1
  • 8
  • 9
  • 10
  • 11
  • 12
  • 14