• AMTRAK NEC: Springfield Shuttle/Regional/Valley Flyer

  • Discussion related to Amtrak also known as the National Railroad Passenger Corp.
Discussion related to Amtrak also known as the National Railroad Passenger Corp.

Moderators: GirlOnTheTrain, mtuandrew, Tadman

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  by electricron
 
And Stadler’s competitive DMU train would be a diesel powered FLIRT.
EPA Tier 4 and FRA alternate complaisance DMU FLIRTs have been ordered by FWTA TexRail(8 DMU), DART Silver Line (8 DMU), and San Bernardino-Redlands Arrow (3 DMU). The FWTA and DART DMUs are 4 car trains, with around 229 commuter seats and 1 restroom per train. One would think an intercity DMU version would have less more comfortable seats and more restrooms on the train. The FLIRTs will probably be equivalent in seating to 3 Amfleet Is car train at most. I’m thinking a larger capacity train would be needed for spur routes off the NEC trains.
  by dha10001
 
Do our high level boarding needs pose a substantial challenge for getting established DMUs running in the Northeast? From what I've seen, Stadler FLIRTS are built for much lower platform heights. Is the platform flexible enough to do 48 inches? This is of particular interest for me in regards to branch line corridors like Danbury and Waterbury, where we'd be seeking good acceleration and medium capacity.
  by electricron
 
dha10001 wrote: Mon Sep 02, 2019 7:18 am Do our high level boarding needs pose a substantial challenge for getting established DMUs running in the Northeast? From what I've seen, Stadler FLIRTS are built for much lower platform heights. Is the platform flexible enough to do 48 inches? This is of particular interest for me in regards to branch line corridors like Danbury and Waterbury, where we'd be seeking good acceleration and medium capacity.
Stadler FLIRTS have variable standard floor heights, from as low as 22.4 inches to as high as 30.7 inches.

But the same can be said about the Siemens Desiro DMUs with identical standard floor heights.
Slightly better are Bombardier Talent DMUs, with standard floor heights from as low as 31.5 inches to as high as 37.8 inches.

I'm not sure 48 inches above top of rail vestibule floor height is doable with any European designed lightweight DMU.
  by gokeefe
 
That's a completely different proposition with regards to construction and standards. A "lightweight" DMU in this case is more along the lines of something used in "light rail" which in the U.S. has no freight and lower maximum speeds.
  by Ridgefielder
 
Jeff Smith wrote: Thu Aug 29, 2019 12:27 pm
njt/mnrrbuff wrote: Mon Aug 26, 2019 8:36 pm Bradkinson, I guess that things have changed and they are supposed to hold connections at New Haven if possible. That was annoying that Metro North had 178 run before 2172. I thought that Acelas are supposed to be the next priority after Metro North. Sadly, on the New Haven Line, CDOT gives MNR the first shots but still, that was probably poor dispatching on CDOT's part for 2172 to be put further in the hole. I laud Metro North overall, but when it comes time for the New Haven Line, I think there is some more room for improvement.
CtDOT does NOT dispatch the NH line; that's MNRR. I don't find their prioritizing of their own trains sad at all... they have x-amount of slots, and if Amtrak misses their slots, MNRR trains should not suffer.
MN's New Haven Line has an annual ridership of 40 million+. That's close to 4x the ridership of all Amtrak services on the entire NEC and probably 10x the number of Amtrak passengers who cross MN territory. I find it astonishing that anyone thinks Amtrak should automatically have priority on this stretch of track.
  by BandA
 
electricron wrote: Mon Sep 02, 2019 8:25 am
dha10001 wrote: Mon Sep 02, 2019 7:18 am Do our high level boarding needs pose a substantial challenge for getting established DMUs running in the Northeast? From what I've seen, Stadler FLIRTS are built for much lower platform heights. Is the platform flexible enough to do 48 inches? This is of particular interest for me in regards to branch line corridors like Danbury and Waterbury, where we'd be seeking good acceleration and medium capacity.
Stadler FLIRTS have variable standard floor heights, from as low as 22.4 inches to as high as 30.7 inches.

But the same can be said about the Siemens Desiro DMUs with identical standard floor heights.
Slightly better are Bombardier Talent DMUs, with standard floor heights from as low as 31.5 inches to as high as 37.8 inches.

I'm not sure 48 inches above top of rail vestibule floor height is doable with any European designed lightweight DMU.
Just add monster tires.
  by bdawe
 
I feel like "they have x-amount of slots" is something of a misstatement. They have x-amount of slots given quality of maintenance and operations, a particular operating pattern, speed limits, etc etc etc
  by lordsigma12345
 
No service next week on Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday north of Springfield, MA for some track work in Massachusetts. 55/56 will terminate at Springfield with substitute bus service serving St. Albans VT, Essex Jct VT, Waterbury VT, Montpelier VT, White River Jct. VT, Bellows Falls VT, Brattleboro VT, Greenfield MA, Northampton MA, and Holyoke MA. Bus service will not be provided to Randolph VT, Windsor VT, and Claremont NH. 495/471/494/478 will also terminate at Springfield on those days with no connecting bus service. Bus service for Greenfield, Northampton, and Holyoke will be provided for trains 55/56 only.
  by Kilo Echo
 
There are many factors militating against the Valley Flyer, especially the fare schedule. For example, an adult, one-way ticket (without additional discounts) from NHT to NHV costs $33. That fare, however, can be reduced to $25.75 by purchasing two tickets: NHT→SPG ($13) and SPG→NHV ($12.75). (Incidentally, using promo code v459 yields a 25% discount on the Valley Flyer till October 31.)

Furthermore, the perpetually delayed completion of platform C is infuriating. Why wasn't the new platform ready for the inaugural run of the new service?
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