• December 7, 1941

  • Discussion relating to the NYC and subsidiaries, up to 1968. Visit the NYCS Historical Society for more information.
Discussion relating to the NYC and subsidiaries, up to 1968. Visit the NYCS Historical Society for more information.

Moderator: Otto Vondrak

  by Roger Hensley
 
The New York Central debuted the Empire State Express, on December 7, 1941. This was to receive all kinds of media publicity. It was overshadowed by another historic event, the bombing of Pearl Harbor by the Japanese.
Let us remember both events, 75 years ago.
Photo "stolen" from the net. Link to a NYCS video touting the Express.
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
  by urr304
 
According to the Dec 7th schedule:
Westbound #51 left Schenectady we were still at 'peace' and by arrival in Utica, we were at war.
The eastbound sections from Cleveland and Detroit were arriving at Buffalo at the same time.

The Empire State Express was well used for the next four years.
  by Roger Hensley
 
"Photo "stolen" from the net. Link to a NYCS video touting the Express."

As far as I know, this photo was never a part of a video. It was a scan and recomposition by Paul F. Doering from a NYC publicity photo! And it said that right at the bottom of the photo! When I use a photo, I always try to give credit where credit is due.

I don't steal anything!
  by NYCRRson
 
"The New York Central debuted the Empire State Express, on December 7, 1941"

I hate to be a nitpicker, but I will anyway, just for historical accuracy. The ESE on the NYCRR dated to the ESE on the NYC&HRRR and was debuted in the 1880's. Originally ran NYC to Buffalo, later extended to Cleveland and Detroit.

Heavyweight passenger cars (3 or 4 including a "smoker") and "smaller" steam locomotives

The Stainless Steel Budd Built ESE of 1941 was an equipment upgrade to a train that had already been in service for well over 50 years. There is a US Post Office Stamp dedicated to the original ESE which allegedly set a land speed record in 1891 of 112 mph around Batavia NY.

I knew what you meant, but the ESE was around long before the Budd Company existed.

Cheers, Kevin