• Locomotive cabs

  • General discussion about locomotives, rolling stock, and equipment
General discussion about locomotives, rolling stock, and equipment

Moderator: John_Perkowski

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  by amtrakhogger
 
That ES44 control stand is a little similar to a LIRR DM30. However,
the DM30's brake valve set-up is to the right of the engineer's seat.
  by emd_SD_60
 
Juniatha wrote:Hi, EMD-SD-60

''UP 5278 max speed'
(I hope this does not mean max speed is 5278 - mph or what?)
and its a good photo, too.

By the way: you have a nice picture of yours - though we can't hear you drumming along I guess it should be some kind of Hard Rock?.
Yes, that would be the locomotive's number.

And you asked abot my picture, well that's none other than Led Zeppelin's John Bonham, probably one of the most popular rock n' roll drummers in the 70's.
  by amtrakhogger
 
Amtrak FL-9's were equipped with a AAR control stand when they
were rebuilt. I hazard a guess MNRR's are/were the same?
Sorry, no picture.
  by BlackDog
 
Juniatha wrote:Hi, EMD-SD-60

[They must incessantly bang their knees to that panel in front of the seat, no?
I think at least I'd have some serious problems with that driving such an engine ..

By the way: you have a nice picture of yours - though we can't hear you drumming along I guess it should be some kind of Hard Rock?.

Juniatha
Those desk top control stands, particularly the early ones are notorious for knocking knees and not allowing you to streatch out. An upright (AAR) stand offers countless slumped and reclined positions to operate or rest in. Throw in an awesome seat that reclines well...voila! Paradise on a stick.

That being said, I would venture that there are not many hoggers who have not smashed their knee on the independant brake valve on an AAR stand, especially the ones where the brake valves are several inches lower in the stand to accomodate the radio. How many have not felt the exhiliration of catching a corner right under the knee cap? It keeps one awake better than any alertor...
Last edited by BlackDog on Mon Feb 05, 2007 8:00 am, edited 1 time in total.

  by Lirr168
 
  by Juniatha
 
Hi Black Dog

My goodness - how do the railways treat engineer's knees? After all, men like women only have one set for a lifetime.
Reading this, drivers will have to cherish the cabs of our present day electrics over here which seem to be club room compartments - not to mention the numerous electronic helpers that virtually run the engine for a driver from electronic starting and acceleration at preset t.e. up to adhesion limit, cruising, signal response and braking to a preset point of stop if you ask it - the driver rather controling the engine than driving it.
The largest problem these days is to keep up alertness with lacking demand of activity in the cab.

Juniatha

  by GOLDEN-ARM
 
A few shots, from some of my "offices", over the years. More to follow, as time allows........

Image

Image

Image

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  by Lirr168
 
G-A, what kinds of cabs are those? I am clueless on modern diesels, so I won't even take a stab at the top and bottom pictures, but the middle ones look to me like an ALCO Sx and a GP7 (9?). What's the verdict?
  by cifn2
 
emd_SD_60 wrote:I thought I would post pics taken inside locomotive cabs, to give others the opportunity to see which control stands each railroads used.

Ex-ATSF, nee AMTK SDP40F:
http://64.246.11.82/images/images2/p/PN ... .37029.jpg

UP SD60M:
http://64.246.11.82/images/images2/u/up ... .96001.jpg

CN SD40-2W:
http://64.246.11.82/images/images2/c/cn ... .54719.jpg

CN GP9RM:
http://64.246.11.82/images/images2/c/cn ... .31391.jpg
Wow that CN GP9RM has a limited view!
  by BlackDog
 
Juniatha wrote:Hi Black Dog

My goodness - how do the railways treat engineer's knees? After all, men like women only have one set for a lifetime.
Juniatha
They treat our knees like they treat the rest of us, like dirt. An on the job injury is a serious crime against the state, so to speak. I am extremely bitter right now so I am trying to temper my comments. But the basic answer is the railroad doesn't care so long as it doesn't cost the railroad money.

  by GOLDEN-ARM
 
Lirr168 wrote:G-A, what kinds of cabs are those? I am clueless on modern diesels, so I won't even take a stab at the top and bottom pictures, but the middle ones look to me like an ALCO Sx and a GP7 (9?). What's the verdict?
Alco C-628 (AF-27) and an EMD GP-18. The others are GE Dash-9's (BNSF). I'll do some oddballs, next time around...... :-D

  by emd_SD_60
 

  by LCJ
 
G-A -- What's the logo on the cap? Is that an "F"? Just curious.

Last GP18 I was on was a B&M "bluebird" running between Rotterdam Jct and Selkirk. I haven't seen the cab of a C628 since Conrail stored all of theirs in the late '70s.

The Dash 9s have a strange composite of the AAR stand and the desktop screen display. Many of the "new" guys on our property don't don't like that set up. It's "different." They'd freak out if we threw a 24RL brake at them!

  by GOLDEN-ARM
 
Hey LCJ, that "F" means front, so I know which way to put it on. Not visible, in the shots, is the lettering inside the cap, that says "stick head in here". You know how it is, with us folks from Florida......... :P


"GE 44 TONNER" (nope, it's not me)
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"C-40-8"
Image
"GP-9"
Image
"SD-40T-2"
Image
"SD-7"
Image
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