• New Station at North Brunswick?

  • Discussion related to New Jersey Transit rail and light rail operations.
Discussion related to New Jersey Transit rail and light rail operations.

Moderators: Tadman, nick11a, Kaback9, ACeInTheHole

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  by 25Hz
 
From the concept PDF's I've looked at, jersey ave would get an eastbound platform on track 1, and the old millstone platform would be closed, and a new ped crossover constructed. The station at the loop is possible but the loop is much more certain than loop with station. In either plan there'd be room for a station left at the loop.

Out working right now, ill dig up the relevant pdf's ASAP.
  by djc47
 
I would like to know as a resident of North Brunswick how this will affect the people of Deerbrook Village,since the railroad is practically in our backyard. We have been dealing with train whistles, men working on the tracks at all hours of the day and evening. Is is possible to place some sort of a sound wall behind this residential area to lessen the noise level for 480 families that live here?
  by Woodcrest295
 
NEXT TIME DONT MOVE TO A PLACE WHERE THERE are train tracks and complain about noise. Your house probably cost less because its next to the train tracks. live with it or move. The train was there first. If anything the you are in the trains back yard. I dont think you will get any sympathy from this crowd.
  by millerm277
 
djc47 wrote:I would like to know as a resident of North Brunswick how this will affect the people of Deerbrook Village,since the railroad is practically in our backyard. We have been dealing with train whistles, men working on the tracks at all hours of the day and evening. Is is possible to place some sort of a sound wall behind this residential area to lessen the noise level for 480 families that live here?
The train line has been there and active since before your homes were built. It's not the train line's problem legally, or (IMO) ethically. Beyond that, a new station will not be likely to have any real effect on you, as the trains will simply be making an additional stop along the way, they already run past your area.
  by djc47
 
We never complained of noise before this new construction and I have been living here for 27 years. Don't tell me where I should and should not live. How about all of the other developments around here that have sound walls? How did they attain them. I am not complaining about the railroad, but rather the noise from the men working at all hours of the day and night. How about a little consideration? The trains and us have lived together for this long without complaints.
  by ThirdRail7
 
djc47 wrote:We never complained of noise before this new construction and I have been living here for 27 years. Don't tell me where I should and should not live. How about all of the other developments around here that have sound walls? How did they attain them. I am not complaining about the railroad, but rather the noise from the men working at all hours of the day and night. How about a little consideration? The trains and us have lived together for this long without complaints.

You should have asked your developer about them while they were building this division. Other than that, you can use your association fees to petition for the wall which will most likely be constructed at the expense of your property.

As for consideration, that's on you. If you live by the tracks, you should expect you hear related noise. You've been quite lucky all of these years but maintenance and construction happens. To put it another way, if they decided due construction on your road, you'd hear noise. This has been on the drawing board for decades. It is not like they ripped out trees or took down the walls after you moved in. You had every opportunity to ask about sound walls, additional trees or any other sort of noise mitigation (planned or otherwise) when you decided to move next to a railroad and a train yard that was already present.

If you're serious, I'd get to work on your homeowners association or community board pronto! This is because what you're seeing is only the preliminary work. Wait until they start erecting the the new catenary poles and moving the tracks. Blowing of the horn while approaching and passing RWP workers is a FEDERAL requirement, no matter how fast or slow the train is operating so don't expect it to get any quieter as construction increases, particularly at night when traffic is down.

Once the station is completed, New Jersey has a state law requiring approaching trains to blow the horn passing next to the platform from basically sun up to sun down and outside of those hours, if the crew observes someone on the platform. Additionally, if there is a train standing in the station as another train approaches, it must blow approaching and passing the standing train. Now , consider the sound of the trains braking and accelerating out of the nearby, new train station and if you happen to leave near the new interlocking, prepare for bright lights at night and the clickety clack of the wheels bounding through it (although it is supposed to have high speed crossovers which aren't as loud.)

Let's not even talk about the additional traffic generated by the station. I moved from East Brunswick just because I knew that 1 and 18 are going to be pushed over the brink once this completed unless they seriously modified the area...and even that would be a nightmare. Additionally, the Jersey Ave trains are supposed to operate to this area, and use the newly constructed Mid-Loop flyover. Nothing like a new bridge and a beaming headlight coming through your window from 30+ feet in the air. :-D

Ultimately, it is up to your specific neighborhood to start the legwork. The best you can hope for is the railroad to pick up part of the costs, but lately, the railroads have been fighting back and taking a "we were here first" stance. Check with your community board and if you don't have one, form one.
  by djc47
 
Thank you for your post in response to my question of a sound wall. It was very helpful and I will get right on it. The homeowners association already told me that it would be too expensive and that I should speak to the mayor about it. I might just do that.
  by loufah
 
Didn't Montclair arrange that trains would blow their horns at stations and grade crossings less than they ordinarily would have? Maybe North Brunswick can do the same.
  by ThirdRail7
 
loufah wrote:Didn't Montclair arrange that trains would blow their horns at stations and grade crossings less than they ordinarily would have? Maybe North Brunswick can do the same.
That was for grade crossings after they met the requirements for quiet crossings. It would not apply in the construction zones.
  by Olton Hall
 
The going price for a noise wall is $1.3 million a mile plus planning/engineering/dealing with NJDEP (which can take years). Not what you call cheap or quick.
  by ryanov
 
I personally would not support public money going to silencing an area where a private developer has built.
  by Don31
 
Olton Hall wrote:The going price for a noise wall is $1.3 million a mile plus planning/engineering/dealing with NJDEP (which can take years). Not what you call cheap or quick.
I'm curious as to what assumptions you used to get that $1.3M figure? The costs of constructing noise barriers depend on several factors, including material type (wood, masonry, sound absorbing, concrete, metal, stone block, earth berm), location, required height, and the amount of ground preparation required for installation. A rough rule-of-thumb is approximately $200/LF.
  by Olton Hall
 
Don31 wrote:
Olton Hall wrote:The going price for a noise wall is $1.3 million a mile plus planning/engineering/dealing with NJDEP (which can take years). Not what you call cheap or quick.
I'm curious as to what assumptions you used to get that $1.3M figure? The costs of constructing noise barriers depend on several factors, including material type (wood, masonry, sound absorbing, concrete, metal, stone block, earth berm), location, required height, and the amount of ground preparation required for installation. A rough rule-of-thumb is approximately $200/LF.
I've designed several of them. The price has been creeping up form $1MM/mile back in the mid 90's to the current price. Wood works the best but has a very short life span and costs more in the long run.
  by ApproachMedium
 
Good luck with Deer Brook village, I know someone else who lives there and his home is going to be removed as part of the loop project so I doubt they are going to build a sound wall knowing that the landscape will be changed in order to accommodate this new NJT project.
  by 25Hz
 
Are you referring to the housing complex bottom left center??

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