Discussion related to New Jersey Transit rail and light rail operations.

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  by Return to Reading Company Olney Sta
 
liftedjeep wrote: Thu Dec 26, 2019 2:37 am
lensovet wrote: Thu Dec 26, 2019 1:35 am Looking at the map there's a wye that goes from northbound river line to eastbound AC line. would it make any sense to run service over this to Haddonfield and back? is the wye even operational?
The portion of the wye you are referring to is the route that WPCA-20 utilizes (Mon - Fri) to access the Hainesport Industrial Track from Pavonia Yard in Camden, via the Atlantic City Line.

The other section (leg) of the wye is how freights into and out of Jersey get from Pavonia Yard to the Delair Bridge, and vise versa.

Haddonfield (Haddon Heights) is accessed from Pavonia via the Beesley's Point Secondary

Ben
And that leg of the wye used by WPCA - 20 does not actually access the Riverline but crosses it on a diamond. The Riverline and freight tracks are separate through the area from Camden past Pavonia to Delair bridge. The freight tracks lie to the west of Riverline. There are pictures elsewhere (believe from poster ChuchuBob) which illustrate.
  by liftedjeep
 
Return to Reading Company Olney Sta wrote: Thu Dec 26, 2019 1:39 pm
liftedjeep wrote: Thu Dec 26, 2019 2:37 am
lensovet wrote: Thu Dec 26, 2019 1:35 am Looking at the map there's a wye that goes from northbound river line to eastbound AC line. would it make any sense to run service over this to Haddonfield and back? is the wye even operational?
The portion of the wye you are referring to is the route that WPCA-20 utilizes (Mon - Fri) to access the Hainesport Industrial Track from Pavonia Yard in Camden, via the Atlantic City Line.

The other section (leg) of the wye is how freights into and out of Jersey get from Pavonia Yard to the Delair Bridge, and vise versa.

Haddonfield (Haddon Heights) is accessed from Pavonia via the Beesley's Point Secondary

Ben
And that leg of the wye used by WPCA - 20 does not actually access the Riverline but crosses it on a diamond. The Riverline and freight tracks are separate through the area from Camden past Pavonia to Delair bridge. The freight tracks lie to the west of Riverline. There are pictures elsewhere (believe from poster ChuchuBob) which illustrate.
That is correct! WPCA-20 crosses the RiverLine at a diamond, just prior to the start of the "new leg of the wye".
Here is one of my own photos of 20 at the diamond, headed for Hainesport:

http://www.rrpicturearchives.net/showPi ... id=3847380

Ben
  by lensovet
 
Interesting, but would it make to run passenger service that way? I guess you would have to put in a switch too.
  by liftedjeep
 
lensovet wrote: Thu Dec 26, 2019 2:03 pm Interesting, but would it make to run passenger service that way? I guess you would have to put in a switch too.
Are you suggesting running the RiverLine up onto the Atlantic City Line??

Ben
  by ExCon90
 
lensovet wrote: Thu Dec 26, 2019 1:35 am Looking at the map there's a wye that goes from northbound river line to eastbound AC line. would it make any sense to run service over this to Haddonfield and back? is the wye even operational?
I think that route would be too circuitous compared to the existing PATCO service from Haddonfield to 16th and Locust in Philadelphia, which also offers much greater frequency than would be possible over the AC line between Pennsauken and Haddonfield. There would also be a change of cars--and levels--at Walter Rand.
  by lensovet
 
yep, just to the point where it joins the speed line
  by Return to Reading Company Olney Sta
 
liftedjeep wrote: Thu Dec 26, 2019 1:49 pm That is correct! WPCA-20 crosses the RiverLine at a diamond, just prior to the start of the "new leg of the wye".
Here is one of my own photos of 20 at the diamond, headed for Hainesport:

http://www.rrpicturearchives.net/showPi ... id=3847380

Ben
Apologies - knew I'd seen it somewhere but thought it was Bob's not yours.
  by WashingtonPark
 
lensovet wrote: Thu Dec 26, 2019 3:52 pm yep, just to the point where it joins the speed line
Having operated on PATCO the big problem as I see it would be placing a station due to the way the line was reconstructed. It would have to be a good ways south or north of Haddonfield making it much less desirable then taking PATCO. The PRSL was rebuilt so that they wouldn't have any stations between West Haddonfield and Lindenwold as that would be competition. DRPA would probably put up a stink if NJT ever wanted to do that. They fought very hard to keep AMTRAK out of there but weren't going to stop them.
  by ExCon90
 
Return to Reading Company Olney Sta wrote: Thu Dec 26, 2019 4:57 pm
liftedjeep wrote: Thu Dec 26, 2019 1:49 pm That is correct! WPCA-20 crosses the RiverLine at a diamond, just prior to the start of the "new leg of the wye".
Here is one of my own photos of 20 at the diamond, headed for Hainesport:

http://www.rrpicturearchives.net/showPi ... id=3847380

Ben
Apologies - knew I'd seen it somewhere but thought it was Bob's not yours.
It was chuchubob's--page 1 of this thread, chuchubob Fri. Oct. 18, 2015, 6:50 pm.
  by MACTRAXX
 
lensovet wrote: Thu Dec 26, 2019 3:52 pm yep, just to the point where it joins the speed line
PB: Keep in mind that the PATCO High Speed Line goes through a deep undergrade
cut in Haddonfield - I decided to reply being surprised that WP did not mention this...

The NJT track is built lower than the PATCO tracks were - the logical place to build a
new station would be at Woodcrest - which could be a single high platform on the N/W
side opposite from the PATCO island platforms. At this point it probably makes sense
to continue the run to Lindenwold - which is 2.6 miles away...

From what I remember reading about the PATCO construction the deep cut through
Haddonfield was an answer to mid/late 60s NIMBY opposition to an aerial structure
or keeping the tracks at or close to grade. This was the most expensive segment of
the stretch of line built on the former PRSL ROW to create PATCO...MACTRAXX
  by amtrakowitz
 
The old, troublesome trains on NJ Transit’s River Line are getting the rail equivalent of a heart transplant.

All 20 trains on the 34-mile long River Line — which runs between Trenton and Camden — are scheduled to receive new diesel engines that meet higher environmental standards and are more fuel efficient, said Nathan Rudy, an NJ Transit spokesman.

The Swiss-built Stadler light rail vehicles on the River Line entered service 15 years ago. This work replaces the original Tier I diesel engines with cleaner, more fuel efficient Tier IV engines, Rudy said.

New engines also should mean fewer breakdowns, translating to fewer delays. Since 2017, breakdowns on the River Line have gotten worse, according to NJ Transit data. River Line trains traveled 9,362 miles between breakdowns in Jan. 2017. That dropped to 5,909 miles between problems in November, frustrating riders. …
NJ Transit line’s new eco-friendly engines will mean fewer delays, agency says — NJ Advance Media for NJ.com
  by lensovet
 
Do folks have insight into why the breakdowns have gotten more frequent? Are new engines really the answer, or just another boondoggle?
  by Pensyfan19
 
Interesting article regarding the River Line and their LRTs.

https://www.railwayage.com/passenger/li ... annel=news
In a pilot project—which has a total cost of $38,020 and is expected to be completed this month—masking material is being used in lieu of repainting the exterior of one of the fleet’s cars in an effort to refresh the appearance and protect the vehicle. The material, known as 1080 wrap, is produced by 3M and is being installed by the Reidler Decal Corporation of St. Clair, Penn. The company also did the decal work on NJ Transit’s “Heritage Locomotives,” which were introduced last year to mark the agency’s 40th anniversary.
Using wrap instead of paint has a number of benefits. It is estimated that applying wrap on the River Line’s entire fleet of 20 trains would result in $570,000 in savings compared to painting the vehicles. The decals would also last from seven to 10 years compared to just five years for paint.

Painting “is also more harmful to the environment and requires special ventilation and equipment. Repairing damaged wrap is much easier and less costly than repainting a damaged or worn exterior,” NJ Transit noted.

In addition, “temporary decals for advertising or for public-awareness campaigns can be more easily applied and removed without damaging the surface of vehicles that are covered in masking material. The same temporary decals can damage the clear coat and paint finish of painted light rail vehicles,” it added.
“Maintaining our vehicle fleets using new techniques like exterior wraps is consistent with NJ Transit’s mission to deliver maximum value to our customers in the most environmentally friendly way possible,” said NJ Transit President and CEO Kevin Corbett. “The pilot project underway on the River Line may eventually help NJ Transit keep our vehicles looking their best and help protect them from wear and tear with the added benefit of substantial cost savings.”