Discussion relating to the past and present operations of the NYC Subway, PATH, and Staten Island Railway (SIRT).

Moderator: GirlOnTheTrain

  by clburton
 
Does anybody know about any LEGAL trips or excursions to abandoned Subway stations.
  by JoshKarpoff
 
Occasionally the Transit Museum will offer tours of abandoned platforms (for a fee, obviously).
Check their events calendar often to see what tours are coming up in the next few weeks.
http://mta.info/mta/museum/programs.htm

Museum members get a discount.
  by Allan
 
clburton wrote:Does anybody know about any LEGAL trips or excursions to abandoned Subway stations.
Visits to abandoned stations was discontinued some years back. This occurred mainly due to some individuals being injured on some old equipment being stored on the platform. It was decided that the risk was to great (as well as so,e security issues) so the tours were stopped.

The only abandoned station that is visited is the IRT City Hall station and you MUST be a Transit Museum member in order to take this tour.

The next ones are scheduled for May 25 and June 19 (both are Saturdays). There are 2 tours on each day - Noon to 1 PM and 2 PM to 3 PM.

The cost is $25 in advance. You can still join the Museum and take the tour (if there is any space left) or future scheduled tours of City Hall station.

http://www.mta.info/mta/museum/#membership
  by Roadgeek Adam
 
Damned political correctness, much?

They aren't falling on the tracks, and flashlights should be in good hand if people are so worried. If I ran the MTA, after services were done, I'd restore 91st Street as a museum honestly.
  by Allan
 
Roadgeek Adam wrote:Damned political correctness, much?

They aren't falling on the tracks, and flashlights should be in good hand if people are so worried. If I ran the MTA, after services were done, I'd restore 91st Street as a museum honestly.
Political correctness has nothing to do with it. The issue is safety and potential risk.

Someone fell over some old equipment on the platform of one of the stations (I think it may have been 91st St) and wound up suing the MTA. I don't know if they won or not. I think it is a good assumption that everyone on the tour had a flashlight (I know everyone did on all the tours I took).

"after services are done" - what does that mean?

91st St is a side platform and only 5 cars long - it would not be use useful as a museum since there are active tracks (24/7) next to it. The cost of putting up soundproof plexiglass at platform edge and other restoration would be prohibitive.

I'd like to see the lower level of City Hall (BMT) be used as an annex of the Transit Museum.