Discussion relating to the past and present operations of the NYC Subway, PATH, and Staten Island Railway (SIRT).

Moderator: GirlOnTheTrain

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  by Jeff Smith
 
http://blogs.villagevoice.com/runninsca ... ricane.php
The Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) just sent us its plan for what it will do if the storm that's predicted to basically be the storm to end all storms hits New York City.

For now, the MTA is suspending construction on almost all subway construction projects it had planned for the weekend, with the exception of work planned for the 7 and J lines. Those projects are planned to conclude before the "Frankenstorm" is expected to hit the Big Apple on Sunday.

As is currently the plan, there will be no shutdown of services in advance of the storm, but officials say there will be if the storm's winds top 39 mph.


The rest of the MTA's plan for the storm is as follows:

...

New York City Transit



Most scheduled weekend subway service changes for construction projects have been cancelled, with the exception of changes planned for the 7 and J lines, which are now scheduled through Saturday only. Crews are inspecting and clearing main drains and pump rooms throughout the subway system. Personnel are checking and cleaning all known flood-prone locations and these areas will continue to be monitored.



Extra workers and managers are prepared to staff New York City Transit's Incident Command Center, situation room, satellite desks, depot operations and facility operations as necessary. The Incident Command Center will be activated starting at 8 a.m. Sunday. Among those present in the ICC throughout the duration of the storm will be Customer Advocates, who will ensure that all decisions made during the event will reflect a focus on customers. They fill a position created after reviews of the agency's performance during Tropical Storm Irene.



Trains will be removed from outdoor yards prone to flooding and moved to more secure locations. Subway ventilation grates vulnerable to flooding will be sandbagged and tarped over. Many station entrances and ventilation grates in low-lying areas have been successfully modified in recent years to raise them above street level, making it more difficult for floodwaters to enter the system.



All portable pumps and emergency response vehicles will be checked, fueled and made ready for service. Outside contractors have been asked to prepare their work sites for heavy weather.



Bus operators are ready to move buses that normally park in low-lying depots to areas of higher ground.
  by lirr42
 
On this day in 1904 this city's first subway opened, and now 108 years later we're talking about shutting the whole thing down for some rain and wind...
  by Clearfield
 
lirr42 wrote:On this day in 1904 this city's first subway opened, and now 108 years later we're talking about shutting the whole thing down for some rain and wind...
If the predictions of the effects of the storm surge combined with the high surf come to fruition, its not hard to imagine alot of water flooding the lines from the entrances at South Ferry and Bowling Green.
  by millerm277
 
lirr42 wrote:On this day in 1904 this city's first subway opened, and now 108 years later we're talking about shutting the whole thing down for some rain and wind...
Well, if the city's underwater, you expect the thing that's lower than the city and has plenty of holes to let water down into it, to not have problems?
  by lirr42
 
MTA's Weather Advisory Page wrote:Governor Cuomo Directs MTA to Move Forward with System-wide Shutdown

The MTA has been directed by Governor Andrew M. Cuomo to begin an orderly shutdown and suspension of all subway, bus and commuter railroad service at 7 p.m. Sunday. The decision was made to protect customers, employees and equipment from the wrath of Hurricane Sandy as the strong storm continues its march up the east coast.

MTA Chairman and CEO Joseph J. Lhota announced that service on NYC Transit subways will be curtailed beginning at 7 p.m., and the bus network within the following two hours. Long Island Rail Road and Metro-North Railroad will start their final trains by 7 p.m. from terminal locations. Subway and rail road stations will be closed after the last trains pass through stations. Outbound Access-A-Ride trips are being scheduled only until 12 p.m. today, and return trips will continue until 5 p.m. Any previously scheduled trips after that time, including subscription trips, are canceled.

Customers are advised to adjust their plans and travel early in the day as possible and not wait until the last train or bus. Anyone who does not leave for their destination before 7 p.m. runs the risk of being stranded when service is suspended. From 5 p.m. until service is suspended in advance of Hurricane Sandy, New York City Transit subways and buses, the Long Island Rail Road and Metro-North Railroad are cross-honoring fares within the five boroughs of New York City in order to facilitate safe trips home or to evacuation points.

Please note that LIRR customers traveling via subway to Jamaica are advised to check the LIRR weekend schedule for the last eastbound LIRR train leaving Jamaica prior to the 7:00 p.m. suspension of service to avoid being stranded in Jamaica.

The MTA Hurricane Plan calls for suspending service hours before the approach of winds of 39 mph and higher. That gives MTA crews time to prepare rail and subway cars, buses, tunnels, yards and buildings for the storm, then return to safety. Winds of 39 mph and higher are predicted to reach the metropolitan region during the predawn hours Monday.

The MTA has been preparing to suspend service for days by readying recovery equipment, clearing drainage areas, moving vehicles from low-lying areas at bus depots and rail yards and sealing some tunnel access points.

The duration of the service suspension is unknown, and there is no timetable for restoration. Service will be restored only when it is safe to do so, after careful inspections of all equipment and tracks. Even with minimal damage this is expected to be a lengthy process.

Customers and the media should monitor this website or call 511 for the most current service information.
MTA Weather Advisory Page wrote:
MTA New York City Transit/MTA Bus reminds customers that all bus and subway services will begin an orderly suspension of service at 7 p.m. this evening for most subway lines, and 9:00 p.m. for buses in anticipation of the high winds and heavy rains driven by Hurricane Sandy. #3 service will run between New Lots Ave & the 137 St #1 station beginning at 4:00 p.m.

NYC Transit subways will run normal service until 7 p.m., service on the bus network will begin to be curtailed two hours later at 9:00 p.m. There will be sufficient bus capacity to allow people to leave vulnerable areas or reach safe destinations before service is suspended. All scheduled weekend construction projects have been canceled to allow for potential evacuation and suspension of service.

Outbound Access-A-Ride trips are being scheduled only until 12 p.m. today, and return trips will continue until 5 p.m. Any previously scheduled trips after that time, including subscription trips, are canceled.
MTA Weather Advisory Page wrote:Transit Oeprations will shut down beginning 7pm today


The Staten Island Railway will cease operations at 9:00 p.m. to coincide with the suspension of Staten Island Ferry service, in order not to strand any customers in the ferry terminal. However, the railway will not operate if conditions are deemed unsafe.

These actions are consistent with our Hurricane Plan, designed to protect the safety of customers, employees and equipment, and ensure our ability to restore service after the storm as quickly as possible. Work has been underway throughout the weekend in anticipation of this possibility.

The Hurricane Plan is designed to protect the safety of New Yorkers before, during and after the expected impacts of Hurricane Sandy. Instituted for the first time last year, prior to the arrival of Hurricane Irene, the plan allows customers to move to safety prior to the storm’s arrival, then protect employees and equipment before dangerous sustained winds of more than 39 mph reach the area.

Thousands of buses and subway cars have been pulled from service and stored in safe locations. Subway yards and bus depots that are prone to flooding have been cleared and that equipment sent to dry areas. Subway stations in flood-prone locations, such as lower Manhattan, will be evacuated of personnel and then secured.

Critical track-level components will be removed from under river tubes so that, if flooding occurs, they will not suffer from the corrosive effects of salt water. Prior to high wind conditions, workers visit elevated stations to make certain that everything is secure and not subject to wind damage.

As soon as conditions allow following the storm, MTA personnel will evaluate damage and begin implementing its plan to restore service as quickly as possible while protecting the safety of all involved. Even with minimal damage this is expected to be a lengthy process that will impact service following the storm. MTA riders are urged to call 511 and stay tuned to mta.info and local news broadcasts before traveling.
More information here: http://alert.mta.info/
  by lirr42
 
Times square is quiet:
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(Photos credit: MTA Flikr)
  by Head-end View
 
Let me get this straight. It hasn't even started to rain yet and the mammoth New York Subway System is shutting down? I could certainly understand suspending service to low-lying areas that are prone to flooding during these storms, but shutting down the whole system? Am I missing something here? Don't they have any regard for people in essential jobs who must get to/from work such as police, fire, EMS, hospital and nursing home workers.

Did they ever do this in any previous hurricane? I don't recall in the last 50 years the NYC Subways shutting down under these circumstances, except maybe in Hurricane Irene last year. Again, if I'm missing something here, please enlighten me.
  by lirr42
 
It's a lot easier to "batten down the hatches" when it's nice and relativity sunny out than when it's raining and 75mph winds.

Believe it or not, this is actually the best option when you look at the big picture. Shutting down in advance lets them secure everything properly well in advance so that there is minimal damage done to equipment and tracks during the storm. Also, it discourages people from going out during the storm.

As far as essential emergency people, they should not be out traveling to or from work in the middle of the storm. They should be either home or at work for the duration of the storm. There is a real and eminent danger coming our way, these people should seek someplace safe sooner rather than later.

They did a similar shutdown leading up to Hurricane Irene, and that worked out for the better.
  by neroden
 
I don't think some of you understand the scale of this hurricane/nor'easter combo. This is the worst storm *ever* to hit New York City, in terms of flooding.

People in essential jobs are not supposed to go to and from work. They're supposed to camp out at work. You don't go "to and from work" in hurricane-force winds if you can possibly help it.

The biggest mistake which has been made by local governments is that not nearly enough evacuation orders were issued.

The predictions are that the subway system will flood, completely unavoidable. Specifically, most of the tunnels between Manhattan and Brooklyn will flood with salt water. That makes it nearly impossible to run any service anyway. The lowest-lying parts of the system are the essential ones, for better or worse.

ConEd is shutting down the steam system, for goodness' sake. That's not something which is *done*. Power is being cut to many buildings in the 'A' category flooding areas, but other, higher-up buildings may get flooded anyway.

This is a much more dangerous storm than Irene.
  by Backshophoss
 
At this point NYCTA is likely moving the pump trains to positions near the lowest points of the system,
as long there's 3rd rail power to run the pumps.....
  by lirr42
 
An empty Stilwell Av Yard:
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(Photo credit: MTA Flikr)
  by railfan365
 
to head-end view: How would you suggest shutting down only in the low lyhing areas when the tracks there are the same ones that run in the higher elevations? And trains have to run thorugh the low regions to connect the higher areas.
  by Kamen Rider
 
railfan365 wrote:to head-end view: How would you suggest shutting down only in the low lyhing areas when the tracks there are the same ones that run in the higher elevations? And trains have to run thorugh the low regions to connect the higher areas.
Some people just have a hard time living in the now, and not acepting that what's happening can't be comapired to anything else.
  by Kamen Rider
 
the MTA has confirmed that there is flooding of the river tunnels, atleast 4 feet of it!

anyone who has complain about the MTA shutting down the system must now eat thier hats.
  by millerm277
 
Been listening to FDNY radio, I've heard at least 1, possibly more subway fires.
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