Discussion relating to the operations of MTA MetroNorth Railroad including west of Hudson operations and discussion of CtDOT sponsored rail operations such as Shore Line East and the Springfield to New Haven Hartford Line

Moderators: GirlOnTheTrain, nomis, FL9AC, Jeff Smith

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  by Steamboat Willie
 
Well, the numbers haven't been anywhere near what they projected. I think the most they brought in was Saturday, 6/6 at 4200. Lots of revenue quirks are still being worked out. It seems as though if the score is lopsided the crowd of people is more consistant leaving rather than a toliet flush like it was when games are tight. When everyone leaves after the game ends it is very crowded.

They also schedule the trains to leave when the game actually ends and the display boards aren't synch'ed to show the actual times. So there is confusion there as well. So last night the game ended earlier than what the trains were scheduled to leave, so they pushed them up.

The service is very benefical to those who live upstate and in CT but for those who live near the city, it doesn't make any sense when you have the subway at your disposal.

This weekend with the subway series will tell more of a story as to how ridership will be (game sold out.) Also with the Boston Red Sox series will also determine ridership. As mentioned before, a good amount of ridership to the new stadium are first time riders on MNR. So word is still getting out.

Harlem Line to SE: While I respect your views about freedom of speech, the way you compose yourself and respond to people warrants the responces you get. Theres a difference sounding like a critic and sounding like a company financial and planning advisor, all of which you aren't. So chill out.
  by Ridgefielder
 
Why would obnoxious drunks be more of a problem on a Metro-North train to Yankee Stadium than on an NYC Subway train to Yankee Stadium?
  by Harlem Line to Southeast
 
Ridgefielder wrote:Why would obnoxious drunks be more of a problem on a Metro-North train to Yankee Stadium than on an NYC Subway train to Yankee Stadium?
Unlike the NYC Subway, Metro-North has NO OUTRIGHT ALCOHOL BAN on its trains.

Also let the record show: I have stated this clearly before in this thread and apparently still needed to clarify. *sigh*
  by Ridgefielder
 
There is a ban on consumption of alchohol in the subway. There is no ban on consuming copious amounts of alchohol prior to boarding the subway, nor is there a ban on being obnoxious in the subway even when sober.
  by Terminal Proceed
 
OK Folks - I have cleaned up most of this thread an erased almost all of his non-sense. In doing so, it was also necessary to erase some of the replies that you good folks posted to attempt to respond to a certain member. If anyone is offended by this I apologize in advance. Now lets get on with the topic at hand. The thread is unlocked, and will be monitored closely. Lets discuss Yankee Stadium service again. Thanks for bearing with us during this difficult time. We now return you to our regularly scheduled programming...


Kevin
  by Tommy Meehan
 
Ridgefielder wrote:After the game, it appeared the bulk of the passengers were heading for the New Haven Line trains; the inbound Croton-Harmon local we boarded didn't seem to load all that many passengers. It felt to me like the subway gets you back to Midtown quicker once you factor in waiting for MN, but that could well be an illusion-- I haven't actually ever timed the #4 between GCS and 161st St. All in all, though, kudos to MNRR for bringing this long-overdue improvement on lline.
I was on the southbound Hudson Line local that arr 153d about 15 minutes before the start of last night's sold-out Mets game. No more than about 30 people got off the train at Yankees-153rd St. (We arr Tk 2.)

Based on comments from friends who live in the city, yes I think many Manhattanites will continue to take the subway. Suburbanites always mention the 4 but the D really packs 'em in too. That was my "train of choice' when I lived in the city. Yes it does matter what part of town you're in, whether you take the D or the 4. But when in midtown one reason I preferred the D was I found the 6th Ave & 42d St station less of a hassle to use than Grand Central.

I'm not surprised the NH Line is the heaviest. Those people RIDE TRAINS!

Btw, I rode the LIRR to Shea many times. I don't remember it beng that crowded. Just the opposite, I remember it NOT being crowded. The 7, yes, like sardines. But maybe that was just the times I rode.

Guess we have to wait and see, but I don't think the ridership is going to be huge.

But I agree, it's a great great service to have. I thank the powers that be and I'll certainly use it every chance I get.
  by Terrapin Station
 
Steamboat Willie wrote:Well, the numbers haven't been anywhere near what they projected. I think the most they brought in was Saturday, 6/6 at 4200. Lots of revenue quirks are still being worked out. ...
This weekend with the subway series will tell more of a story as to how ridership will be (game sold out.) Also with the Boston Red Sox series will also determine ridership. As mentioned before, a good amount of ridership to the new stadium are first time riders on MNR. So word is still getting out.
Thanks for that info. I'm very interested in hearing what the ridership numbers are, both avg and peak. If you have any more insight on that subject, please post, or send me a private message. Thanks.
  by Steamboat Willie
 
Mr. Meehan, the trains that arrive almost at game time are tame compared to the earlier arrivals. It seems the trains arriving 1-2hrs before game time are loaded then tamper off. I've been there to witness all of this.

Besides.. arriving 15mins before game time when it takes 10 minutes to walk from the station to the stadium, wait to be gated then find your seats? The game would be in the 4th inning!
  by Trainer
 
Steamboat Willie wrote:
This weekend with the subway series will tell more of a story as to how ridership will be (game sold out.) Also with the Boston Red Sox series will also determine ridership. As mentioned before, a good amount of ridership to the new stadium are first time riders on MNR. So word is still getting out.
It will take longer than that to determine normal ridership, regardless of the popularity of the games themselves. It's going to take a while for this new way to travel to a ball game to catch on, and word will keep getting out all season. Some will take the train as a novelty now and never take it again, and many others don't even know it exists yet. As momentum grows, and word of mouth on this option spreads, I think it'll be next year before we can begin to see realistic "normal" data.
  by Stephen B. Carey
 
I just used the station for the first time this past Friday and it seemed pretty busy to me. On the way in the shuttle train was packed, the conductor said over the PA that they had not expected this many people and apologized for not opening up all the cars on the train.

After the game, the shuttle to Grand Central was pretty much empty, though there were a lot of people as I walked into the main station area. Overall I think it is a really good idea because the new station takes a large burden off of the subway, as I left I looked at the people going to board the 4 train and it really looked like a lot less, but since I don't have any actual statistics I cant really say on that matter.
  by RearOfSignal
 
Stephen B. Carey wrote: After the game, the shuttle to Grand Central was pretty much empty, though there were a lot of people as I walked into the main station area.
To get to some of the parking lots you have to go through the station lobby(up and over the tracks, the station replaces the old walkway). That's why it seemed so like there were so many people going to the station but not getting on the trains.
  by The Interloafer
 
RearOfSignal wrote:To get to some of the parking lots you have to go through the station lobby(up and over the tracks, the station replaces the old walkway). That's why it seemed so like there were so many people going to the station but not getting on the trains.
Ditto for the ferry to Manhattan and New Jersey.
  by Stephen B. Carey
 
That would explain why you can go through right past the station. I figured there were parking lots or something on the other side of the tracks. Though I did not know about the ferries.
  by Jeff Smith
 
Yankee Train Station A Big Hit Record Online 7.7.09
"Parking and traffic down there are terrible. This is great — easy, convenient. I won't go any other way now," said Erin McDermott of Newburgh, who was en route to her second game in as many days with seven friends.

A crowd with a six-pack of Corona and takeout pizza on board also pointed out there's no worrying about drinking and driving if you take the train.

First-timers Sean and Karen Hansen and their son, Matthew, 8, drove 25 minutes to the Poughkeepsie station from their Rhinebeck home and, by the time the train reached Beacon and more true believers poured on, declared themselves sold.

"We went to 18 games last year and I just know this will be easier than driving," Sean Hansen said.
An interesting synopsis of the service. Given the earlier (rather heated) discussion of alcohol, I thought this was interesting and relevant.
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