Discussion relating to the operations of MTA MetroNorth Railroad including west of Hudson operations and discussion of CtDOT sponsored rail operations such as Shore Line East and the Springfield to New Haven Hartford Line

Moderators: GirlOnTheTrain, nomis, FL9AC, Jeff Smith

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  by Jeff Smith
 
A new page! Very similar to the M8 page now:

http://www.mta.info/mnr/html/catenary.htm
Current Status of the Catenary Replacement in New York and Connecticut


The New York State NHL catenary section - originally 44 miles of the older, existing fixed termination catenary system - was successfully renewed in 1993 with a state-of-the-art constant tension catenary system. As the name implies, this type of construction can better accommodate temperature extremes.

CTDOT commenced catenary replacement in 2001. The work was programmed in phases to limit any impact on train service. The CTDOT catenary program, developed in conjunction with Metro-North (MNR), included the replacement of 20 fixed bridges and 2 moveable bridges in four separate phases, utilizing track outages to concurrently work on both the catenary and bridge components of the project in each phase. CTDOT has restructured the catenary program to expedite the catenary replacement with an anticipated completion date of 2015.

Today, of the 172 miles of catenary on the NHL main line in the State of Connecticut, 63% is the new constant tension system and 37% is either the original antiquated system or out of service for repair. The NHL's operation is particularly vulnerable in the 7-mile stretch between Southport and Bridgeport where catenary replacement and 5 bridge projects are underway. Of the four tracks in that area, 2 tracks are normally out of service for catenary replacement and bridge work; all trains, therefore, must operate on the other two tracks under old catenary which hampers MNR's operational flexibility in this area. However, to alleviate this problem and to combat potential service disruptions, work has been suspended on one of these two tracks this winter, which will increase MNR's operating options, particularly during weather events.

This system is decades past its useful life and the condition of the system is susceptible to failures, significantly impacting service reliability. As a result, customers may experience delays during this critical ongoing infrastructure improvement.

Miles:
172 (total) 108 (done) 7 (4%) (OOS) 57 (33%) (Remaining) 12/9/11 (as of)

*excludes yards, sidings and New Canaan main track
  by MACTRAXX
 
Everyone: I have just one question concerning the 37 % remaining of the older NHL/CDOT catenary:

How much of that is the problematic "floating span" type which is tough to replace?

MACTRAXX
  by DutchRailnut
 
all of remaining is floating beam construction, only other construction on New Haven was Triangular and that has all been gone for few years now.
  by Clean Cab
 
Currently floating beam suspension style wire is still in use on all tracks from CP 241 to CP 248. From CP 248 to CP 255 on tracks 1 & 3, and all tracks from CP 255 to CP 261. Constant tension overhead wire has replaced triangle and floating beam suspension everywhere else on the New Haven Line.
  by Jeff Smith
 
Checking the site, there's a recent update:

http://mta.info/mnr/html/catenaryupdate.htm

Total Miles of NHL Main Line Catenary in CT*
172 (total)
Miles of Catenary Replaced in CT
101 (59%)
Miles of Catenary Out-of-Service for Replacement in CT
14 (8%)
Miles of Catenary To Be Done in CT
57 (33%)
Information Provided
3/14/12
CTDOT has restructured the catenary program to expedite the catenary replacement with an anticipated completion date of 2017.

Today, of the 172 miles of catenary on the NHL main line in the State of Connecticut, 59% is the new constant tension system and 41% is either the original fixed termination system or out of service for repair.

The NHL's operation is particularly vulnerable in the 7-mile stretch between Greens Farm and Bridgeport where catenary replacement and 4 bridge projects are underway.

Starting March 19, 2012 (and lasting about 8 months), 2 of the 4 tracks in that area will again be out of service for catenary replacement and bridge work; all trains, therefore, must operate on the other two tracks (one still with the original fixed termination system) which hampers MNR's operational flexibility in this area. For more details, click here.

(You may remember that 2 tracks were out of service for most of 2011 for the catenary work. An additional track was returned to service last December to increase MNR's operating options for winter weather-related events.)
  by Train538
 
I had a funny feeling the project would be getting up to speed soon. Yesterday I heard a report about a broken hanger at cat. pole 688 in the Fairfield station on track 1 (old wire & hangers).
  by Clean Cab
 
Train538 wrote:I had a funny feeling the project would be getting up to speed soon. Yesterday I heard a report about a broken hanger at cat. pole 688 in the Fairfield station on track 1 (old wire & hangers).
The project is moving as fast as possible. Removing the old style wire and putting up the new style takes time.
  by Patrick A.
 
It will truly be an end of an era when the last of the M2/4/6's are off the rails and all of the wires become constant tension.
  by workextra
 
Is this high tension centenary the same or of similar type used east of New Haven on the NEC? Would it permit speed increases for Amtrak and or MNCR trains in addition to not having speed restrictions due to the weather (centenary) conditions providing track and clearance issues are addressed?

Also while on the topic of replacing wire, Is there any plans in the future to re-electrify the Danbury branch? Would it be beneficial?
Not being familiar with much of the NH Line are all 4 tracks still in service or was one removed and it's now 3 tracks?
  by DutchRailnut
 
Other than reliability nothing will change on New Haven, for higher sppeds the Cabsignal would need to be changed to accomodate higher speed but that would result in less troughput of trains.
The Danbury electrification is a pipedream, at over 200 million its not worth the 3 minute gain.
Add to that the purchase of 44 electric cars to cover said service at 3.2 million per car and you see its just a pipedream. electrification would not guarantee trough service.
so a change at south norwalk would still be required 85% of time.
  by Jeff Smith
 
Patrick A. wrote:It will truly be an end of an era when the last of the M2/4/6's are off the rails and all of the wires become constant tension.
What will you do for a signature then? ;-)
  by Patrick A.
 
Jeff Smith wrote:
Patrick A. wrote:It will truly be an end of an era when the last of the M2/4/6's are off the rails and all of the wires become constant tension.
What will you do for a signature then? ;-)
I'll think of something, probably a countdown to whatever the next major capital project is on the NHL. The bridges are probably on deck in the next decade or so for an upgrade, no?
  by Jeff Smith
 
Patrick, we'll be talking about the M10's by then, right? There's always something.

Here's another update on the site to the catenary project, including talk of concurrent bridge rehab/replacement projects:

http://mta.info/mnr/html/catenary.htm

Quoted in full from public-agency site:
On March 19th, catenary work will resume on two tracks between Southport and Bridgeport. This phase is expected to continue through the end of November.

Over the winter, the catenary and bridge replacement project continued in this section with only one track out of service.

To accomplishment this next phase of work-which includes catenary wire replacement, bridge construction and installation of interlocking wire-we also have to take a second track out of service to allow the Connecticut Department of Transportation's contractor to continue work in this phase of the project (The bridges, for example, span both tracks and the contractor needs an adjacent track for work equipment.)

This leaves us again with only two of four tracks in service in this 7-mile area, impacting our operating flexibility and ability to combat potential service disruptions during emergencies. And although we will work diligently to ensure we provide you with the best commute possible during this period, some of you may experience occasional train delays and service disruptions.

(In 2011 we had 2 tracks out of service for this project. However, we returned one track back to service in December 2011 in order to be as prepared as much as possible in the event of any winter weather-related emergencies.)

During this phase a lot of work will be accomplished, including:


4 open-deck bridges in Bridgeport and Fairfield (at North Benson Rd., Fairfield Ave., South Ave. and Main St.) are being replaced with closed deck ballast-style ones (which provide a smoother ride) in this area. The support girders of these bridges rest on two tracks, making it necessary to take them out simultaneously. This work is scheduled to take place from June to September.
New interlocking wire (basically the wire for track switches) will be replaced at Bridgeport Station. This work is slated during June and July.
About 7 miles of new catenary wire will be installed over one track between Bridgeport and Southport. This work will occur from September to November

Underway since 1991, this project will replace the original catenary, first erected in 1907.

If it seems that we have a lot more to do, we would like to point out that a lot has been done already! The Connecticut portion of the line has seen the replacement of wires from New York/Connecticut State Line to just east of South Norwalk; and from Milford to New Haven (including an interface with the Amtrak shoreline catenary system east of New Haven Station)

Currently about 59% of the catenary replacement work in Connecticut has been finished. And, from 1991 to 1995, on the New York State portion of the New Haven Line, third rail replaced existing catenary wire from Woodlawn to just north of Mt. Vernon East. We also installed new catenary wire from Pelham to Port Chester. The catenary project is being done to replace the older, existing fixed termination catenary system with a state-of-the-art constant tension system. As the name implies, this type of construction can better accommodate temperature extremes.

We're coming closer to the finish line with this catenary work and as we advance, we'll continue to provide you with updates.
  by Clean Cab
 
New Haven Line drawbridges COB, WALK, SAGA, & DEVON should all be replaced about the time to M12's arrive!!! :)
  by Patrick A.
 
So long as they don't fall into their respective rivers first :wink:
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