• Renaming of Yawkey Way station?

  • Discussion relating to commuter rail, light rail, and subway operations of the MBTA.
Discussion relating to commuter rail, light rail, and subway operations of the MBTA.

Moderators: CRail, sery2831

  by BandA
 
There was a track running through the parking lot up until the construction of the new Yawkey station. I don´t know whether it was connected the last few feet. I assumed it was connected to the green line tracks at Fenway, but not sure.
  by Arborwayfan
 
Minor Nitpick: Lechmere, the defunct store chain, was named after Lechmere Square after the station at the same square had been named after the square. The square was named for a colonial landowner.
  by Teamdriver
 
jaymac wrote:
by Teamdriver » Sat May 05, 2018 12:46 pm
... alas the proof is in the picture.....
Alas, if it's DeKuyper, it's probably only 60 proof.
Most of their line is below 60 proof , they are a cordial liquor bottler.
  by jaymac
 
by Teamdriver » Sun May 06, 2018 12:07 pm
...they are a cordial liquor bottler.
On that theme, here's to us all!
  by charlesriverbranch
 
BandA wrote:There was a track running through the parking lot up until the construction of the new Yawkey station. I don´t know whether it was connected the last few feet. I assumed it was connected to the green line tracks at Fenway, but not sure.
It was indeed connected to the Green Line, which used to be the Boston & Albany's Highland Branch until 1956.

The other end of the branch at Riverside is still connected to the main, unless that has changed recently.
  by charlesriverbranch
 
Kilo Echo wrote:The MBTA practices unusual economy with regard to naming stations: Symphony Hall is "Symphony"; Davis Square is "Davis"; and Yawkey Way is "Yawkey."
The MBTA's naming economy is not universal. What used to be "Washington" is now "Downtown Crossing"; the former "Columbia" became "JFK/UMass"; and "Charles" has become "Charles/MGH".
  by R36 Combine Coach
 
At one point Hynes Convention Center was "Auditorium". Science Park has been renamed "Science Park/West End".
  by jwhite07
 
Simplicity in station naming was once the rule. One or two very descriptive words maximum was common. Boston even went so simple yet explicit that some station platforms had different names depending on which direction one was going (e.g. what is now State on the Orange Line was once known as Milk heading toward Forest Hills and State heading toward Everett). Only much more recently has the naming of stations involved more complexity and (ugh) corporate influence (which I suppose started rather early with the renaming of Mechanics station to Prudential in the 60s).
  by Kilo Echo
 
charlesriverbranch wrote:The MBTA's naming economy is not universal. What used to be "Washington" is now "Downtown Crossing"; the former "Columbia" became "JFK/UMass"; and "Charles" has become "Charles/MGH".
The names "JFK/UMass" and "Charles/MGH" are still quite terse. Why not use names like "JFK Library-UMass" and "Charles-Mass General?" (For me, "MGH" recalls memories of McGraw-Hill.)
  by Arborwayfan
 
I don't like corporate sponsorship or advertising in station names much either, but the T doesn't seem that bad, and the naming for landmarks that are businesses isn't new.

Mechanics after the Mechanics Hall, Prudential after the Prudential Center that the Mechanics Hall was torn down to make room for. The Mechanics Association was a kind of charitable educational society organized by a list of names that looks like the leaders of a chamber of commerce for the 1780s (Paul Revere and whatnot), so in its own way it was corporate. And naming the station for the landmark when a new name was needed because the old landmark was gone made sense. Symphony. Rowes Wharf. All more or less businesses.

On another point: I have wondered about the terse names, too. I wonder if it has to do with how the names look on the maps. There's certainly plenty of space on the station signs, and only a few stations need to go on destination signs.

Why not Central SQ, Longwood AVE, etc. Do you think someone at the T (or all the way back to BERy) has been trying over the years to separate the station names from the streets and squares they are named after for some reason?

Some changes are just changes: I remember Longwood/Hospitals, now Longwood Medical Area. I prefer the first even though the second is a little more accurate. I was very confused when I first found out that Brigham Circle was not the loop I had seen (Heath Street); I wonder if there used to be an actual rotary in front of the PB Brigham.
  by jaymac
 
by Arborwayfan » Tue May 08, 2018 8:53 am
...I wonder if there used to be an actual rotary in front of the PB Brigham.
Assuming Wikipedia is accurate, the only rotary for Brigham Circle was actually on Francis Street, Huntington Avenue being a straight shot. Back in the cobblestoned street-rail days, especially coming after downgrade on Tremont in the rain and on narrow tires and with mechanical brakes, the accident victims had the consolation of being close to the Brigham.
  by TomNelligan
 
Arborwayfan wrote:Why not Central SQ, Longwood AVE, etc. Do you think someone at the T (or all the way back to BERy) has been trying over the years to separate the station names from the streets and squares they are named after for some reason?
I agree with your point... adding Square, Street, etc., sounds more complete. Just as a historical note, the short names do predate the MBTA. As a reference see this undated subway map from the Metropolitan Transit Authority era. Based on the fact that it shows service to Wonderland but not the Riverside Line, it would be from sometime between 1954 and 1959. You'll notice inconsistencies on the el, like Thompson Square and Green Street, but also Dudley, Dover, and so on. I guess that's just the way things were.
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  by BandA
 
Short names were easier to announce, and might even be understood! I´m struck how simple and pretty that MTA map is, and how downtown centric.
  by leviramsey
 
TomNelligan wrote:Based on the fact that it shows service to Wonderland but not the Riverside Line, it would be from sometime between 1954 and 1959.
Based on Day Sq. (vs. Wood Island Park), the posted map can be narrowed to 1954 (Day Sq. was renamed to Wood Island Park in October of that year).
  by R36 Combine Coach
 
TomNelligan wrote:"Red Sox/Fenway Park" is straightforward and says exactly where the station is located. And if any out-of-towners still manage to confuse a commuter rail station on the B&A with Fenway on the Green Line, they're still in more or less the same neighborhood. For what it's worth, the big ballpark in the Bronx is served by an el station called 161 Street/Yankee Stadium and a rail station called Yankees/East 153 Street and life apparently manages to go on without massive confusion.
Even CTA's station at U.S. Cellular is "Sox-35th". The Cubs' home station is just "Addison".