Discussion related to commuter rail and transit operators in California past and present including Los Angeles Metrolink and Metro Subway and Light Rail, San Diego Coaster, Sprinter and MTS Trolley, Altamont Commuter Express (Stockton), Caltrain and MUNI (San Francisco), Sacramento RTD Light Rail, and others...

Moderator: lensovet

  by Backshophoss
 
In the end of this "nightmare" becomes an "Improved route" for the San Joaquin services.. So this is how CaHSR dies on the vine.
And Metrolink,Coaster Caltrain with LOSSAN get needed $$$$ to improve service.
  by eolesen
 
Huh.. That sounds a lot like what Anderson has been pushing for a strategy.... Build up the corridors, grow the ridership, and gradually increase the demand and support for higher speed services.
  by David Benton
 
Looking over the next options, I would think Palmdale - Tehapachi is the logical next section to complete. Its relatively easy , unpopulated with few roads to cross. Much is at ground level .
It would allow a passenger to be on the train from L.A to Tehapachi, a short bus trip to Bakersfield , then rail to existing destinations.
I'm sort of wondering why they didn't close this gap first. Probably because the L.a Palmdale , and Bakersfield - Tehapachi sections either side require a lot of tunnels and viaducts.
  by lensovet
 
David Benton wrote: Mon Nov 04, 2019 1:14 am Looking over the next options, I would think Palmdale - Tehapachi is the logical next section to complete. Its relatively easy , unpopulated with few roads to cross. Much is at ground level .
It would allow a passenger to be on the train from L.A to Tehapachi, a short bus trip to Bakersfield , then rail to existing destinations.
I'm sort of wondering why they didn't close this gap first. Probably because the L.a Palmdale , and Bakersfield - Tehapachi sections either side require a lot of tunnels and viaducts.
It's been beaten to death but people hate mode transfers. train → bus → train? who would take that? rail fans don't count.
  by Tadman
 
The algebraic method of computer highway capacity is a non-starter. Consider my recent drive from Chicago to Milwaukee: work zones, traffic jams, accidents, off ramps, bad weather left lane grannys... None of these allow for the two second rule and 55-65mph driving. The realistic average speed for that whole trip was nowhere near 65mph, and quite a lot of it was crawling past accidents, waiting to merge for road work, stoplights at on ramps...

Consider the Top Gear races where Clarkson drives a massively overpowered car and Hammond/May are forced to take public transit the whole way. While this is a parody of real lift, it illustrates just how limited drivers in something like a Nissan GTR or Mustang GT350 are despite being quite nimble and powerful.

I was quite disappointed with the entire CAHSR effort, but HSR and HrSR will play a relevant role in the future. Traffic in the really large metroplexes is just getting to be too heavy.
  by Jeff Smith
 
Editorial on currently proposed legislation: https://www.record-bee.com/2020/05/09/c ... rain-plan/
In an encouraging development, the Assembly Transportation Committee returned from lockdown exile and immediately advanced two bills to curtail a reckless plan by the California High-Speed Rail Authority.

This editorial board has urged lawmakers to heed the warning from the Legislative Analyst’s Office to move quickly if it wants to make changes to the rail authority’s current plans, which call for signing 30 contracts this year to commit the project to costly and inflexible electrification plans.

On Monday, the committee voted in favor of Assembly Bill 3213 by Luz Rivas, D-Arleta, which would require the rail authority to prioritize projects that provide the “most overall benefits to the state.” The criteria for determining those benefits include “increasing passenger rail ridership” and “replacing automobile trips with passenger rail trips.”

The effect of the law would be to foil the plans of the rail authority to proceed with contracts for electrification on the Central Valley segment and route several billion dollars to making improvements in highly populated areas such as Los Angeles.
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  by Pensyfan19
 
Jeff Smith wrote: Mon May 11, 2020 11:54 am Editorial on currently proposed legislation: https://www.record-bee.com/2020/05/09/c ... rain-plan/
In an encouraging development, the Assembly Transportation Committee returned from lockdown exile and immediately advanced two bills to curtail a reckless plan by the California High-Speed Rail Authority.

This editorial board has urged lawmakers to heed the warning from the Legislative Analyst’s Office to move quickly if it wants to make changes to the rail authority’s current plans, which call for signing 30 contracts this year to commit the project to costly and inflexible electrification plans.

On Monday, the committee voted in favor of Assembly Bill 3213 by Luz Rivas, D-Arleta, which would require the rail authority to prioritize projects that provide the “most overall benefits to the state.” The criteria for determining those benefits include “increasing passenger rail ridership” and “replacing automobile trips with passenger rail trips.”

The effect of the law would be to foil the plans of the rail authority to proceed with contracts for electrification on the Central Valley segment and route several billion dollars to making improvements in highly populated areas such as Los Angeles.
...
A reckless plan eh? Is it me or do those words sound a bit biased? Also, does this sound like they're trying to slow the development of this high speed line again? Not to mention, it's calling for making improvements in areas which it won't be reaching to since phase one goes from Bakersfield to Merced, even though they are working with LA Union Station.
  by bdawe
 
Ya, electrification is necessary in the end. If Sacramento wants to kill off HSR they should do it. If they don't, they should put up bonds and build it. There's lots of things wrong with HSR planning, but the stringing of wires is among the things that are extremely right here.
  by Pensyfan19
 
bdawe wrote: Mon May 11, 2020 12:22 pm Ya, electrification is necessary in the end. If Sacramento wants to kill off HSR they should do it. If they don't, they should put up bonds and build it. There's lots of things wrong with HSR planning, but the stringing of wires is among the things that are extremely right here.
Wasn't there a request from the Sacramento mayor to leave the high speed rail to private operators about a year ago? Also, isn't DB USA supposed to operate this line? How is that supposed to operate since DB is a German government-owned company? (Please correct me if I'm wrong)
  by bdawe
 
DB or SNCF or NS (the dutch one) are all international rail operators. In fact, before the late coronavirus disruptions most rail services in the UK were state-owned, just not British-state-owned

Keolis (operates MBTA Commuter Rail) is mostly SNCF owned. DB operates the London Overground

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/h ... 58961.html

By contrast, I think that Caltrans/CHSRA should operate HSR and hire the talent necessary to do it properly and have the in-house knowledge necessary to not be scammed by their contractors and concessionaires.

I thought before that Amtrak should bid on a UK franchise contract both as a learning exercize and because it would be hilarious
  by eolesen
 
The moves in the legislature are absolutely correct here. It's an orphan system, Federal funds have dried up and/or been clawed back, and it's pretty clear there won't be a next phase built anytime soon.

Caltrans needs those funds to finish electrification projects in high population areas. The desert train can wait.
  by Jeff Smith
 
Older news: https://www.rtands.com/rail-news/watch- ... -in-calif/
Progress continues to be made on high-speed rail construction in California. The California High Speed Rail Authority recently released video on construction near Kimberlina Road and S.R. 43.
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