• EMD "Tunnel Motor" official thread (covers all variations)

  • Discussion of Electro-Motive locomotive products and technology, past and present. Official web site can be found here: http://www.emdiesels.com/.
Discussion of Electro-Motive locomotive products and technology, past and present. Official web site can be found here: http://www.emdiesels.com/.

Moderator: GOLDEN-ARM

  by ljeppson
 
Here's a picture I shot today (9/21/2007 @ 6 PM) of the last pure Rio Grande unit (unpatched and unrenumbered). I think 5371 is an SD40T-2.

www.utahtransit.us/grantsgravel1.htm

  by NHRDC121
 
ljeppson....et al
Well....since it IS an ex Rio Grande unit, that makes it easy, it's an SD40-T2. The Rio Grande never owned any SD45-T2's, the SP was the only one. But getting back to what I was referring to earlier about the inspection doors for the cooling fans. Each door has a rectangular sticker on it which is plainly visible, even in this shot on the shadow side of a black unit. Note there are two, if it was an SD45-T2, there would be three.

  by SSW9389
 
There were 84 SD45T-2s with COTTON BELT lettering on their sides. Southern Pacific was not the only railroad with that model. COTTON BELT's Bicentennial locomotive was an SD45T-2 numbered 9389. :wink:

NHRDC121 wrote:ljeppson....et al
Well....since it IS an ex Rio Grande unit, that makes it easy, it's an SD40-T2. The Rio Grande never owned any SD45-T2's, the SP was the only one. But getting back to what I was referring to earlier about the inspection doors for the cooling fans. Each door has a rectangular sticker on it which is plainly visible, even in this shot on the shadow side of a black unit. Note there are two, if it was an SD45-T2, there would be three.

  by NHRDC121
 
Cotton Belt, EsPee, it's all in the family, ya know what I mean?

  by trainiax
 
but from a modeling standpoint you wouldn't be abel to tell unless you were looking at it real close?
Well... You'd still probably be able to tell them apart pretty easily. The two units share the same frame length and same general radiator area (albeit with a different number of access hatches) but the hood on the SD40T-2 is shorter, meaning it has a huge "porch" on the front like an SD40-2 (but not on the back) while the SD45T-2 doesn't.

  by Steve F45
 
trainiax wrote:
but from a modeling standpoint you wouldn't be abel to tell unless you were looking at it real close?
Well... You'd still probably be able to tell them apart pretty easily. The two units share the same frame length and same general radiator area (albeit with a different number of access hatches) but the hood on the SD40T-2 is shorter, meaning it has a huge "porch" on the front like an SD40-2 (but not on the back) while the SD45T-2 doesn't.
Well now i may not have to worry about it now that Athearn is releasing new NYS&W tunnel motors. Fairly good price i may pick up all 3 for my bday and chrismas.

  by emd_SD_60
 
Not one to bring up an old topic, but I was down at Cobden Hill today, and taped a loaded grain train with a SD40-3, SD75I, and a GP38-2 for power, and boy were all three units digging their wheels in the rails to get up the grade with out stalling! It was so loud that passing cars on the road behind me were drowned out by the engines. Looked like the unit producing the turbo whine was the middle unit, a CN SD75I.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yr-025mFauI

  by MEC407
 
That is some serious EMD howling! :-D

Hope the crew had hearing protection. :wink:

  by GN 599
 
You guys should check out the other clip he has of them switching on the Burbank branch with a SW1500 and a GP-9. Guy rides a tank car to a joint while switching with no shirt on. Then they pull out and the same guy is riding the rear car out standing on the knuckle. Thats some classic railroading for ya...
  by SHAGGY
 
Mike, Would you mind email those videos to me. I am unable to get them through streaming, but could download them. Any other videos would be great. No trains here in the sand box. T/Y SHAGGY
  by budd5670
 
Now that SP/Cotton Belt/DRGW are no longer, and the T-2's are dispersed among many railroads, why arent they still needed for their original/intended use, in tunnels over the Rockies? Wouldn't standard units/older SD's now overheat where the T-2's used to be needed?
  by v8interceptor
 
budd5670 wrote:Now that SP/Cotton Belt/DRGW are no longer, and the T-2's are dispersed among many railroads, why arent they still needed for their original/intended use, in tunnels over the Rockies? Wouldn't standard units/older SD's now overheat where the T-2's used to be needed?
The older SD's are starting to be retired in greater and greater numbers...Newer locomotives starting with the EMD 60 series have improved cooling and electronic engine control systems and thus don't have nearly the problem with overheating in tunnels that the older units had...
  by Tadman
 
Also, SP had a policy of running long, heavy, slow trains through the tunnels. When you run slow heavy trains, the diesels spend more time in the tunnels. EMD's have higher radiator intakes that suck in hot air from the upper parts of the tunnel. Evidently UP, BN, et al run their trains fast enough that they get out of the tunnels quick enough that the hot air doesn't affect them as much. SP didn't, so they bought tunnel motors.

There's actually a story in Trains Mag a few years back about EMD telling SP they should run shorter faster trains, and SP ignoring that advice. Ergo, they purchased tunnel motors to cope with the extensive exposure to hot cooling air.

In the 90's, SP bought a lot of GE's, which normally have lower cooling intakes (which makes all GE's de facto tunnel motors). That sounds all dandy, but I guess the crews don't like that. According to Doug Riddel, a former Seaboard/CSX engineer and PTJ author, when you walked past a radiator intake with the fan on, it sucked any loose clothing over the grate surface and got it really dirty. I'm guessing he didn't exactly wear seersucker suits, so it had to be pretty messy.
  by GulfRail
 
Tadman wrote:There's actually a story in Trains Mag a few years back about EMD telling SP they should run shorter faster trains, and SP ignoring that advice. Ergo, they purchased tunnel motors to cope with the extensive exposure to hot cooling air.
Really? You remember which year/issue? I'd like to see this article.