• Bucksport Branch activity & news

  • Guilford Rail System changed its name to Pan Am Railways in 2006. Discussion relating to the current operations of the Boston & Maine, the Maine Central, and the Springfield Terminal railroads (as well as the Delaware & Hudson while it was under Guilford control until 1988). Official site can be found here: PANAMRAILWAYS.COM.
Guilford Rail System changed its name to Pan Am Railways in 2006. Discussion relating to the current operations of the Boston & Maine, the Maine Central, and the Springfield Terminal railroads (as well as the Delaware & Hudson while it was under Guilford control until 1988). Official site can be found here: PANAMRAILWAYS.COM.

Moderator: MEC407

  • 322 posts
  • 1
  • 18
  • 19
  • 20
  • 21
  • 22
  by gokeefe
 
newpylong wrote:What is interesting about it?
I would have expected, "Not part of our plan at this time."

"Definitely an option" tells me that they think rail has some potential use for them. I was questioning whether or not rail was even relevant.

The Little River site for the Belfast farm is not rail served. The only possible rail use I can see at that site would be dray to Waterville and possible feed from the rail served distributor in Augusta. No apparent use for the B&ML.
  by NHV 669
 
It's an option, simply because the infrastructure is already right there. No railroad in their right mind is going to send equipment down 20 miles of decrepit, rusty, class I track for 5 cars/week. The same would apply to the 30-mile B&ML. Why grasp at straws for snail-pace rail service, when trucks can get it out faster, and likely much cheaper?
  by Hux
 
So, as I cranked away on the can opener, eagerly anticipating a tuna sandwich, I was brought back to this thread. Just how does farm raised salmon (or cat fish in Mississippi) go to market? Does it go as a complete fish or is it filleted? We assume cold, thus not canned. But why not a cannery? Is the demand higher for whole(ish) fish, or might canned salmon be a profitable enterprise worthy of consideration?
  by gokeefe
 
This farm is being built for fresh/frozen not canned. The demand they are working on is meeting the market for whole/filets that is currently being covered about 95% by imports.
  by MEC407
 
NHV 669 wrote:No railroad in their right mind is going to send equipment down 20 miles of decrepit, rusty, class I track for 5 cars/week.
SLR did exactly that for several years, except it was more like three cars a month instead of a whopping five cars a week... but even SLR came to their senses eventually. :wink:
  by newpylong
 
Wasn't that on State owned track though?
  by gokeefe
 
Yes. I agree it continues to be a long shot. That being said ... The volume is similar/higher to interchange in Brunswick.
  by NHV 669
 
....for cement/steel that doesn't need to be kept frozen, and also on state-owned track.
  by Cosakita18
 
Exactly this. A truck from Bucksport could reach any major east coast market in less than 12 hours, and in terms of freshness... hours matter for restaurants that are ordering seafood.

Or they could send their perishable product on a substantially longer journey on a railroad that doesn't exactly have a reputation for speed and reliability. It makes no sense at all for them to use rail for either inbound or outbound deliveries. Not enough volume and not the right kind of product.
Last edited by MEC407 on Tue Feb 27, 2018 10:58 am, edited 1 time in total. Reason: unnecessary quoting
  by MEC407
 
newpylong wrote:Wasn't that on State owned track though?
It is now, but they also did the same thing back in the days when they still owned it and the bean factory was still the only customer on the line.
  by KSmitty
 
Really whats the difference between State owned RoW and railroad owned RoW? MaineDOT's operator tenants are usually responsible for upkeep. Though SoM may kick in funds to reopen a shuttered line, routine maintenance falls on the operator. The other big expense is property tax, which obviously you don't pay if you don't own the RoW. But I wouldn't think that is really a factor either, since you're going to pay taxes if you own it, regardless of its operational status.
  by newpylong
 
KSmitty wrote:Really whats the difference between State owned RoW and railroad owned RoW? MaineDOT's operator tenants are usually responsible for upkeep. Though SoM may kick in funds to reopen a shuttered line, routine maintenance falls on the operator. The other big expense is property tax, which obviously you don't pay if you don't own the RoW. But I wouldn't think that is really a factor either, since you're going to pay taxes if you own it, regardless of its operational status.
You answered your own question - taxes. SLR does not pay taxes on state track, their choice to operate was solely seeing a relative return vs upkeep. Pan Am's return has to be vs upkeep and property taxes on Bucksport.

Railroads don't abandon lines because they just don't want to maintain them, if that was the sole case they would just mothball them. They want them off the books entirely including liability for ownership.
  by Cosakita18
 
Good news for Bucksport, but none of those new businesses are likely to use rail. The Bucksport branch is dead.
Last edited by MEC407 on Sat Sep 08, 2018 1:57 pm, edited 1 time in total. Reason: unnecessary quoting
  • 1
  • 18
  • 19
  • 20
  • 21
  • 22