• Acela Replacement and Disposition Discussion

  • Discussion related to Amtrak also known as the National Railroad Passenger Corp.
Discussion related to Amtrak also known as the National Railroad Passenger Corp.

Moderators: GirlOnTheTrain, mtuandrew, Tadman

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  by Backshophoss
 
Believe after all the law suits between BBD and Amtrak were settled,Amtrak got total control of the Acela Fleet,
BBD retained control on the Hippos(HHP-8's),now stored.
  by ApproachMedium
 
Backshophoss wrote:Believe after all the law suits between BBD and Amtrak were settled,Amtrak got total control of the Acela Fleet,
BBD retained control on the Hippos(HHP-8's),now stored.

Yes as of this year, or last i think, All Acela HST now says AMTRAK on the blue card and NOT BBRX like the HHP-8
  by Matt Johnson
 
Fan Railer wrote:New Velaro D in Acela scheme concept art from Siemens... seems like they're confident they'll get the order, given their currently cushy relationship with Amtrak:
Cool, looks a little different than the Euro version! Presumably it'll feature active tilt.
  by Jeff Smith
 
Site admin note: topic maintenance. I'm going to fold in a few threads, and add some news links which are dated so they may already have been covered. Nevertheless, it's an important topic.
  by Jeff Smith
 
Here are some of the older news links and brief, fair-use quotes:

Philly.com
Amtrak and California end joint plans for new trains

Amtrak and California have ended their effort to jointly buy high-speed trains for the West Coast and the Northeast Corridor.

A meeting with train manufacturers in Philadelphia this month convinced officials that the needs of the Northeast and California - including top speeds and route configurations - were just too different.

The California High-Speed Rail Authority is planning to operate 220 m.p.h. trains on a newly built corridor between San Francisco and Los Angeles by 2029.

Amtrak wants 160 m.p.h. trains to replace aging Acela Express equipment on the century-old Northeast Corridor - right now.
  by Jeff Smith
 
Forbes
Amtrak Looking To Boost Acela Express Capacity, Speeds

Amtrak’s Acela Express service may not be true high-speed rail, but as ridership hits new records and trains consistently packed, Amtrak is looking to prepare for the future by replacing its current rolling stock.

On Wednesday afternoon, Amtrak said it has issued a request for proposal to “acquire new trainsets to supplement and eventually replace its aging Acela Express.” Acela Express, which runs exclusively along the Northeast Corridor (NEC), is currently operating near capacity and frequently sells out before and after major holidays.

The RFP seeks up to 28 next-generation high-speed trainsets capable of meeting or exceeding current Acela trip-times on the existing NEC infrastructure. Aside from faster trains, Amtrak is also looking to boost the passenger capacity of each trainset by 40 percent, or 120 passengers. Just how Amtrak plans to do this is unknown, however.
  by Jeff Smith
 
Bloomberg
Amtrak Acela Replacement Plan Creates Bombardier Rivalry

Dec. 14 (Bloomberg) -- Amtrak’s plan to replace its fleet of Acela trains provides an opportunity for Siemens AG, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Hitachi Ltd. and others who want to compete with Bombardier Inc., the supplier of equipment used since the service’s start.

“There’s not that many companies that build the trains,” said Andy Kunz, president and chief executive officer of the U.S. High Speed Rail Association, a Washington-based group whose members include Bombardier, Alstom SA, Siemens and Patentes Talgo SA. “But the handful that there are would all be ready to bid.”

Replacing the Acela, which can operate at speeds of as much as 150 miles per hour, may be Amtrak’s biggest equipment purchase since it bought the original trains in a contract valued at $1.2 billion when signed in 1996. Amtrak doesn’t have a cost estimate because it’s at “the very beginning of this process,” Steve Kulm, a railroad spokesman, said.

Montreal-based Bombardier worked with Alstom, based in Levallois-Perret, France, to build the 20 Acela train sets that consist of locomotives integrated with passenger cars. “We would love to work with Amtrak on their next generation of trains,” Maryanne Roberts, a Bombardier spokeswoman, said in an e-mail yesterday.
  by Jeff Smith
 
Railway Age
Amtrak issues RFP for Acela fleet replacement

AMTRAK has issued a request for proposals (RFP) for 28 high-speed trains, which will replace the Acela Express fleet on the Washington DC – New York – Boston Northeast Corridor (NEC).

According to the specification the new trains will need to be "capable of meeting or exceeding current Acela trip-times on the existing NEC infrastructure," and provide a 40% increase in seating capacity.

The tender will only be open to bidders who have already supplied trains capable of operating at more than 257km/h to other operators. The closing date for expressions of interest is October 1.

Amtrak had previously planned to tender the contract jointly with California High-Speed Rail Authority, which requires up to 70 high-speed trains over a 15-year period, but the two parties decided last month to launch separate tenders due to significant differences in the specifications for the two fleets.
  by Jeff Smith
 
Reuters
Canada's Bombardier bows out of Amtrak's Acela procurement

Canada's Bombardier Inc said on Monday it is not bidding for the contract to replace Amtrak's high-speed Acela, clearing the way for a rival to produce the next generation of the popular but sometimes troubled U.S. passenger trains.

The first Acela trains, which Bombardier made with France's Alstom SA, went into service in 2000. Amtrak is to announce the new supplier this spring. Alstom declined to comment on whether it is bidding.

A request for proposals closed Oct. 1, but Amtrak has not made the identities of the bidders public. The railroad is looking to buy 28 trains, up from 20 last time, with capacity for at least 425 passengers, up from about 300.

...

Bombardier and Alstom were paid $730 million for the original Acela trains and their maintenance facilities, plus more for maintenance contracts.

Problems with the first Acela trains were legendary in the railroad industry. Bathroom doors malfunctioned and small cracks appeared in key parts. In 2005, Amtrak idled the whole fleet for months after discovering cracks in brake discs.
  by bdawe
 
I didn't even realize Alstom was in the running for the next generation high speed trains
  by Fan Railer
 
http://www.schumer.senate.gov/newsroom/ ... n-hornell-" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
U.S. Senator Charles E. Schumer today visited Steuben County to announce that tomorrow the Amtrak Board of Directors is expected to select Alstom as the train provider for a $2.5 billion program to build the Next Generation High-Speed trains that will create over 750 jobs, including 400 jobs directly at Alstom in Hornell. During Schumer’s visit, he explained that while the final details of the contract still need to be negotiated, the Amtrak Board of Directors is expected to give the green light needed to move forward with those final negotiations exclusively with Alstom. This impending decision by the board paves the way for Alstom to build the next generation high-speed trains that will operate on the Northeast Corridor and is a monumental victory for upstate manufacturing. According to company executives, Alstom anticipates such a contract would create approximately 400 jobs in Hornell and potentially an additional 350 or more across the rest of New York. With more than 750 jobs expected between the Alstom’s Hornell facility and the ripple effect this massive contract would have throughout Upstate NY, Schumer said it would be a win for the entire Upstate NY economy.
Very interesting.
  by Matt Johnson
 
Wow, how about that! Figured Siemens had it locked up.
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