• Amtrak NEC Virginia Regional Service

  • Discussion related to Amtrak also known as the National Railroad Passenger Corp.
Discussion related to Amtrak also known as the National Railroad Passenger Corp.

Moderators: GirlOnTheTrain, mtuandrew, Tadman

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  by east point
 
Our group keeps hoping that the Day train ATL - WASH routed thru Raleigh and use the "S" line to Richmond and then WASH. That schedule time might be at least 1 hour quicker than the present Crescent route. Using present Carolinian route probably same time as Crescent route? .
  by gokeefe
 
Interesting question ... Is the S-Line faster from RGH to PTB?
  by Bob Roberts
 
gokeefe wrote: Sat Dec 28, 2019 1:16 pm Interesting question ... Is the S-Line faster from RGH to PTB?
According to NCDOT it will be more than an hour faster than the current NCRR to A line route.

I -think- that the S line will still be a marginally slower trip from CLT-WAS than the Crescent route (but that wasn't really the question).
Last edited by Bob Roberts on Sat Dec 28, 2019 11:51 pm, edited 2 times in total.
  by mtuandrew
 
njt/mnrrbuff wrote: Sat Dec 28, 2019 10:12 am I just remembered that if any catenary is being considered on the RF&P, it would have to meet the clearance of not only double-stack CSX trains, but the VRE trains as well as the Amtrak Auto Train which uses Superliners. I know that the superliners can operate under the catenary at WAS. Daily, there are gallery cars that run through that 1st Street Tunnel and when the Cardinal uses Superliners, that train does as well.
Right, I’ve been considering that too. I assume that Auto Train could continue to operate on CSX rather than moving to state-owned rails, since it operates more or less as a freight train anyway. That means the new lines won’t need to have double-stack or tri-level auto carrier clearance, only Superliner or Gallery clearance.
njt/mnrrbuff wrote: Sat Dec 28, 2019 10:12 amWhen the increased Amtrak train frequencies begin, people who are heading to Richmond on daytrips will have more options. For those who are spending a day in the Downtown area will have plenty of flexibility as they wouldn't have to leave DC or northern Virginia too early and then get back super late.
Absolutely looking forward to this.
  by gokeefe
 
Bob Roberts wrote: Sat Dec 28, 2019 1:44 pmAccording to NCDOT it will be more than an hour faster than the current NCRR to A line route.
WOW. That would be a huge gain.
  by jcpatten
 
I notice in the RF&P map that the track takes a dogleg from Guinea to Pinola then back to Ruther Glen. I don't know what the population density is around there, but a high speed passenger line could go straight between Guinea and Ruther Glen and probably cut time between Richmond and DC.
  by mtuandrew
 
jcpatten wrote: Sat Dec 28, 2019 6:22 pm I notice in the RF&P map that the track takes a dogleg from Guinea to Pinola then back to Ruther Glen. I don't know what the population density is around there, but a high speed passenger line could go straight between Guinea and Ruther Glen and probably cut time between Richmond and DC.
There’s a utility corridor that crosses the RF&P just south of Claiborne that starts drifting west, but in a mostly-straight line. It connects to the I-95 right of way at Nancy Wright’s Corner, which could easily carry a high speed route to Ruther Glen. If for whatever reason the I-95 median isn’t an acceptable option (though I think it is the best future option), there’s a pair of utility corridors that are a little more direct, branching off near Claiborne and crossing CSX a couple miles north of Ruther Glen both north and south of Coleman’s Mill Crossing.
  by Literalman
 
The route from DC to Richmond is very important from a business perspective.
Some years ago I attended a presentation in Ashland, Va., and if I recall correctly the main speaker was Boardman and it was sponsored by the Richmond Chamber of Commerce. Someone from the chamber said that the number-one problem with the Amtrak service was reliability. I-95 was unpredictable, and the airport in Sandston, Va., is southeast of the city and away from much of the business development, which is mostly downtown and on the west side. The business people wanted fast, reliable train service between Washington and Richmond.

As someone who has used the Fredericksburg and Alexandria stations countless times, I agree that unreliability is far and away the biggest problem. Amtrak may be right on time or it may be two hours late. If the state RF&P purchase makes the service reliable and, furthermore, faster and more frequent, business people will use it.
  by njtmnrrbuff
 
As I mentioned, both DC and Richmond are capitol cities. In addition, they are 107 miles from each other and obviously have trains running between them. The punctuality of Amtrak is hit or miss. When it is on time, it is on time a lot. However, there have been many times when it has been very late, especially south of DC, thanks to CSX. I'm sure that there are many business people who use the train from DC to Richmond but it all depends on where their meetings are. Being that a lot more trains stop at Staples Mill Road Station, I don't think I would be too pleased if I had to go to Downtown Richmond for my meeting as I would have to take an Uber ride that is eight miles. When more trains stop at Richmond Main Street Station, I hope that Staples Mill Road Station still remains open as that station serves Henrico and the other Richmond western suburbs well.
  by Arlington
 
RVR Staples Mill is 100% part of the long term plan and as illustrated in the graphic showing phased service additions, exsing trains will be rerouted south of RVR to cross the James on a different bridge so as to add RVM (Main St) and new trains all stop at both RVR and RVM.
  by Riverduckexpress
 
A recently-introduced bill in Congress would allow the National Park Service and the U.S. Dept of the Interior to turn over some 4 acres of federally-owned parkland to D.C. and Virginia to use for the construction of the Long Bridge expansion.

Energy News Network article
Now, yet another act of Congress is needed to double the volume of the latest iteration of what is now a two-track bridge — and a crushing chokepoint for commuter and freight train traffic in the nation’s capital. Federal legislation will enhance Virginia’s long-envisioned role as a rail linchpin in a greened-up transportation corridor connecting the Southeast with the Northeast.

Virginia clean transportation advocates are confident President Donald Trump will sign what’s called the Long Bridge Act of 2020. U.S. Reps. Rob Wittman, R-Va., and Don Beyer, D-Va., introduced the measure in the House, and U.S. Sens. Mark Warner and Tim Kaine, both Virginia Democrats, have followed suit in the Senate.

It’s a crucial federal piece of a complicated eco-overhaul initiated by Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam, a Democrat. Briefly, it permits the National Park Service to transfer to Virginia and Washington, D.C., the land needed for the construction of a new rail bridge near the existing Long Bridge, as well as an adjacent pedestrian/cyclist bridge.
Looks like the bill is moving through the House, but not the Senate.

The draft environment impact statement for the project published last year projected that the final EIS and record of decision would come out during the summer (i.e. now), but no doubt that's been thrown off due to COVID.
  by mtuandrew
 
Not much is moving through the Senate except judicial nominations, Riverduckexpress.

I park in Lot C regularly, directly on the northern flank of the eastern Long Bridge approach. Guess I’ll have to find a new parking spot when construction starts!
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