• Amtrak EMU Discussion - Metroliners, Current Proposals, etc.

  • Discussion related to Amtrak also known as the National Railroad Passenger Corp.
Discussion related to Amtrak also known as the National Railroad Passenger Corp.

Moderators: GirlOnTheTrain, mtuandrew, Tadman

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  by njtmnrrbuff
 
[quote="rcthompson04"]There is a lot of discussion of the constant tension issue, but wouldn't the real benefit for EMUs for Amtrak to be on services where it is unlikely to get up to 125mph anyway due to frequent stops? The Keystones are a good example of this need. The trains can barely get up to speed between Exton - Downingtown - Coatesville - Parkesburg with the ACS-64 equipment, which is a vast improvement from the AEM-7s.[/quote]

I think electric motors in general were a vast improvement in acceleration from when there were P42s and P40s pulling three to four car Keystones. I think that it's about five miles from Exton to Downingtown, about six miles from Downingtown to Coatesville, and six miles from Coatesville to Parkesburg. If EMUs were to operate in Amtrak Keystone service, the time savings between stations might not be that greater than a Sprinter pulling five Amfleets.
  by west point
 
The NJT EMUs are capable of more than 100 PH but were limited to 100 last time rode them Newark - Trenton . 12 cars were the train so six pans. It may be Amtrak expects harmonic waves on the CAT at speeds above 100 with more than 2 pans close together.
  by njtmnrrbuff
 
The NJT Arrow IIIs have been limited to 80 the majority of time in their 40 years of revenue service. Once, I think they could do 90 for a short time but then they were brought down to 80.

Back to Amtrak EMUs, hopefully if Amtrak EMUs ever run, they would have a top speed that matches its other locomotive hauled trains. If they can't get up to 125 safely, then it wouldn't be worth considering purchasing EMUs.
  by andegold
 
I rode the NEC regularly (not quite a commuter but close) 1993 through 2000. This included more than a few rides in the vestibule of an overcrowded AIII. As they came back from overhaul in 1997 - 1999 the digital speedometers would regularly display sustained speeds of 100 with peak speeds of around 107 (or possibly 111 but I won't swear to either of those peaks).
  by gokeefe
 

njt/mnrrbuff wrote:Back to Amtrak EMUs, hopefully if Amtrak EMUs ever run, they would have a top speed that matches its other locomotive hauled trains. If they can't get up to 125 safely, then it wouldn't be worth considering purchasing EMUs.
It seems to me like Amtrak wouldn't even bother with anything that can't be certified for 125 MPH.


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  by Tadman
 
It would be interesting to see a chart or something that shows how much time is spent at 125, 150, 110, 100, 90, etc... on an average regional and Acela. Not MAS, just what speed is required to keep time.
  by bdawe
 
you can kind-of get a sense looking at the speed-location maps that are available. I picked a random Acela from last year that was on time https://asm.transitdocs.com/train/2019/6/3/2168

You can see where it was slow and where it was fast.
  by rcthompson04
 
njt/mnrrbuff wrote: Fri May 29, 2020 2:36 pm The NJT Arrow IIIs have been limited to 80 the majority of time in their 40 years of revenue service. Once, I think they could do 90 for a short time but then they were brought down to 80.

Back to Amtrak EMUs, hopefully if Amtrak EMUs ever run, they would have a top speed that matches its other locomotive hauled trains. If they can't get up to 125 safely, then it wouldn't be worth considering purchasing EMUs.
What are the fastest EMUs in the US these days? The Silverliner Vs I would guess at 110mph. I am not sure they ever go that fast though.
  by bdawe
 
frequentflyer wrote: Tue Jun 02, 2020 9:07 am https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hitachi_A-train

Find it funny how many on this forum act like there is no capable equipment out there to fit the NEC's needs.
And they're street legal with minor modifications! (and 48" boarding height edition) Tell your reps! tell your execs!
  by bostontrainguy
 
I always thought the Japanese had the right idea with their 287 Series trains. By placing the engineers in an elevated position above the floor level they allowed passage between sets with diaphragms hidden behind opening doors to connect sets together. Really great idea.
JR EMU.jpg
Wikipedia has the height of the 287 at 11' 5". I don't think that is correct. Amfleet is 12' 8" so a 2 foot "dome" would be possible or the cab simply designed into the front of a 14' high cab car which is the height of a Viewliner. Looking at the pic below it seems like it would be very possible.
Viewliner.JPG
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  by Tadman
 
I've recommended the 800 in the past, having used them on GWR. Not bad if you can fix the crummy seats.
  by Gilbert B Norman
 
bostontrainguy wrote: Tue Jun 02, 2020 10:54 am I always thought the Japanese had the right idea with their 287 Series trains. By placing the engineers in an elevated position above the floor level they allowed passage between sets with diaphragms hidden behind opening doors to connect sets together. Really great idea.
Totally agree, Mr. Trainguy.

Especially since during May '68 (R&R from 'Nam), I rode such, named "The Midori", from Hiroshima to Kyoto seated in the rear cab of such. A Conductor "visited" me, but otherwise could have cared less. Also did same, on a "Hikari" (First Gen "Bullet") Kyoto to Tokyo. So did a Conductor, who also "cared less".
  by David Benton
 
Gilbert B Norman wrote: Tue Jun 02, 2020 11:31 am
bostontrainguy wrote: Tue Jun 02, 2020 10:54 am I always thought the Japanese had the right idea with their 287 Series trains. By placing the engineers in an elevated position above the floor level they allowed passage between sets with diaphragms hidden behind opening doors to connect sets together. Really great idea.
Totally agree, Mr. Trainguy.

Especially since during May '68 (R&R from 'Nam), I rode such, named "The Midori", from Hiroshima to Kyoto seated in the rear cab of such. A Conductor "visited" me, but otherwise could have cared less. Also did same, on a "Hikari" (First Gen "Bullet") Kyoto to Tokyo. So did a Conductor, who also "cared less".
Don't think youv'e mentioned that Japanese trip before , Mr Norman , surely worth a thread in the WW or Trips forums.
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