• GE 70 Ton Centercab Restoration

  • General discussion related to all railroad clubs, museums, tourist and scenic lines. Generally this covers museums with static displays, museums that operate excursions, scenic lines that have museums, and so on. Check out the Tourist Railway Association (TRAIN) for more information.
General discussion related to all railroad clubs, museums, tourist and scenic lines. Generally this covers museums with static displays, museums that operate excursions, scenic lines that have museums, and so on. Check out the Tourist Railway Association (TRAIN) for more information.

Moderators: Miketherailfan, rob216

  by Rick Rowlands
 
In 1942 General Electric built eight 70 ton center cab diesel locomotives for the New York Central. Numbered 506-513, they were among the first 70 ton switchers built by GE. Originally intended to be used switching passenger cars in terminals, these locomotives proved to be geared too low for that service and were reassigned to other duties. Some were made into shop switchers while at least one other went to Despatch Shops as a shop switcher. By 1952 NYC sold off three of the locomotives, 511, 512 and 513 to Ortner Railcar who resold the units to Standard Slag Co. in Youngstown, OH. 511 and 512 went to Youngstown while 513 went to Cambria Slag (A Standard subsidiary) in Sharpsville, PA. 513 would later go to Youngstown as well. The two locomotives, which started life as NYC 512 and 513, then SSX 40 and 41, finally wound up at Valley Mould as 6114A and 6114B. The 6114A was used primarily for switching scrap cars at the melt shop while 6114B was used as a general plant switcher and for moving bottle cars of molten iron from the melt shop to the foundry. In 1992 Valley Mould closed its doors and a year later the plant was reopened as Ellwood Engineered Castings. Both were originally painted black but 6114B received a coat of read paint in the late 1990s in an attempt to more easily distinguish the two locomotives.

In 2007 the decision was made to retire the two switchers, which by that time had been in service 65 years. The 6114B was offered to the Tod Engine Heritage Park in Youngstown for preservation. In late 2008 title to the 6114B was transferred to the Heritage Park. The 6114A suffered an electrical cabinet fire a few years earlier and had become a parts source to keep 6114B alive. Due to other pressing concerns the 6114B sat at EEC during all of 2009, but now the locomotive has been prepped for its final five mile trip to the Tod Engine Heritage Park for restoration and operation. That move is scheduled to occur next week.

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In 1968 the ex NYC 513 was in Youngstown, OH at the Standard Slag plant at Republic Steel.

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This shot was taken at the same location in 1977.

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In 1980 after purchase by George Silcott the SSX 41 was shipped to McKees Rocks, PA for refurbishing. Here it is in McKees Rocks.

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In 1999-2000 I worked at Ellwood Engineered Castings, and while there was qualified to operate the ex NYC 513, which by now was the 6114B. On a bright sunny Saturday I brought along my camera and took a few shots of the locomotive posed at various locations around the plant.

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Here I posed it with a 150 ton hot metal car.

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And finally, eight years later I find myself aiming my camera at this unit again, but this time not as a railfan employee, but as savior.
  by Rick Rowlands
 
Our 70 ton switcher from Ellwood Engineered Castings was moved to the Heritage Park today.
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Taking off the hoods to remove the engines.

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Without the hoods.

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Off the trucks.

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6114B and its replacement.

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Loading the trucks.

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Two MG sets (Cummins NTC 335s driving 250 VDC generators) and the other EEC locomotive.

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"Did that train just blow through that stop sign?"

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Wheeling through downtown Hubbard

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Setting the first truck on our display track.

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And finally, 70 more tons of historic iron now call the Tod Engine Heritage Park home!

VIDEO of the movement of the locomotive can be seen here:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sOKKVYuwMnc
  by Mr. Ed
 
Are you going to put the engines back in? And of course, how much did it cost to move (cranes, hauler, etc.) the 70 tonner? Thanks.

Later!
Mr. Ed
  by Rick Rowlands
 
The engines go back in after the engine compartments have been cleaned and painted. Don't know the cost, I haven't received the bill yet!
  by Mr. Ed
 
We aren't that fortunate. Every time we move a piece of equipment, the crane and hauler want checks as soon as they are done. But do let us know how much when they bill you, please.

Later!
Mr. Ed
  by Rick Rowlands
 
The moving bill came in the mail today:

80 ton crane $2,140.00
Crane permits $350.00
tractor trailers (3 loads) $2,570
Hauling permits $175.00

Total to move a GE 70 tonner five miles in three truckloads, including loading and unloading: $5,235.00
  by Mr. Ed
 
Thanks. Short moves are still expensive. But using the same crane company saves a bunch since they only charge you a daily rate. When you need two in farther areas, they kill you twice with two daily rates.

Good luck in your restoration. You've got your work cut out for you. Our 100 tonner was put up rebuilt so it started the first time after sitting for over 20 years. It needs cosmetical restoration but she's good mechanically.

Later!
Mr. Ed
  by Rick Rowlands
 
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Merry Christmas from the Tod Engine Heritage Park!
  by Rick Rowlands
 
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We have not done any further work on the 70 tonner this year aside from reattaching the fuel tank. We did construct another 30 feet of display trackage to hold a Kling type hot metal car that was built by Pollock in Youngstown.

Is this the only preserved "hot metal train" in the US? Sure seems like it!
  by CBRy
 
Will this loco ever operate again or is it fated to be a permanent
cosmetic restoration?
  by Rick Rowlands
 
The 70 tonner will be restored to operable condition and its gensets will provide 250 volt DC power to operate DC equipment at the museum. It will in essence become a stationary power plant.
  by CBRy
 
Nice! Maybe once it becomes operable, you could move it
back and forth a few feet with that car and qualify as the
"Shortest Shortline"! :-D Would be fun!
  by BEDT 14
 
Gentleman (and ladies)!

Being involved with Rail-Marine Terminals of New York Area, my co-author Joe Roborecky sent me the following link to view the embedded NYC Weehawken Terminal images:

http://viewoftheblue.com/photography/weehawken.html

In the the bottom-most photo, we took note of the low profile center cab switcher working the yard. This began a 90 minute quest to identify this weird locomotive. The cab lettering is barely legible as New York Central, but the number on the cab was indiscernable.

After several keyword and book searches (Diesel Spotters Guide, Critters Dinkys and Centercabs, etc) and "near misses" with other locomotive websites (northeastrails) of which the unit was not an identical match to others in images, I finally hit upon this thread and was able to match the locomotive in the photo exactly to the one discussed here.

So, I don't know if any of you ever saw this image or not, so in good spirit, I thought I'd share it here. I did not take the image, nor do I own it, and it was posted in the Rail Marine Group Forum on yahoo.com (message 5849).

As such, we continued to look for more info in the interest of learning about this class of loco and found the following images as well, and again, thought I'd share for those you haven't yet seen them:

http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/nyc/nyc506s.jpg
http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/nyc/nyc-x509s.jpg
http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/nyc/nyc-x510s.jpg

I am even more pleased upon reading the posts here that at least one of these early generation oil-electrics survive! Thanks to all for starting this thread and Best wishes to it's ongoing restoration!

Philip M. Goldstein
  by Rick Rowlands
 
Philip,

Thank you very much for posting the link! Yes these centercab 70 tonners are quite rare and I am very proud that we were able to pull off the preservation of the 513. the 513 spent most of its life working in the steel mils of western PA and eastern Ohio, but she was built for the service that you see in the photo, switching passenger cars.

We will be taking good care of the 513 and we do have plans to place the locomotive under cover. We will not be backdating it to its NYC appearance as that would obliterate its later significance as a mill switcher. If you happen to stumble upon more photos of the 70 ton centercabs please post them.

Thanks

Rick Rowlands
President
Youngstown Steel Heritage Foundation
http://www.todengine.org