• HVRM GE 95-ton restoration

  • General discussion related to all railroad clubs, museums, tourist and scenic lines. Generally this covers museums with static displays, museums that operate excursions, scenic lines that have museums, and so on. Check out the Tourist Railway Association (TRAIN) for more information.
General discussion related to all railroad clubs, museums, tourist and scenic lines. Generally this covers museums with static displays, museums that operate excursions, scenic lines that have museums, and so on. Check out the Tourist Railway Association (TRAIN) for more information.

Moderators: Miketherailfan, rob216

  by JasonA
 
More progress.

The last hole in the sub-floor.

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The sub-floor patched.

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Removed a bit more of the interior sheeting to run conduit for the marker light, rear headlight, and interior light.

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We got the firemans side sand filler installed and welded out. The cover on the inside is finished and this is what it will look like when finished.

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I got tired of my cramped tool storage issue, so I bought an additional box.

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  by brett tallman
 
Hi Jason,
That's a huge amount of work you have done. I have a 1942 GE 80-tonner I keep at the Alturas, California railroad museum which has had an easy career with the Army, and in the western dry climate here has little or no rust. The welding you have done is outstanding. Keep up the good work.

Best of luck, Brett T.
  by JasonA
 
Just an update. The engine is just about ready for paint. I have all the missing photos, and one of these days they will be posted.
  by Rick Rowlands
 
I certainly appreciate these photos, more than you can imagine. I am on the verge of beginning a similar project on the oldest existing GE 70 ton centercab, Ellwod Engineered Castings no. 6114B. The bottom of the cab walls are rotted away and will need rebuilding. The 6114B was used in the steel industry, and bears the scars of such service. I do not want to remove that battle damage, but do want to repair the rust damage.

It is still at EEC. We plan to move it by truck to the Tod Engine Heritage Park in Youngstown, OH next week. We are going to move it in two loads, cab and frame on one truck and the engines and trucks on another. While the engines are out I'll refurbish the engine compartments.

Now that the 95 tonner's work is winding down, maybe I'll start a thread with photos of the restoration of the 6114B.

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  by Otto Vondrak
 
JasonA wrote:Just an update. The engine is just about ready for paint. I have all the missing photos, and one of these days they will be posted.
Looking forward to seeing them when they're ready!
  by Otto Vondrak
 
Rick Rowlands wrote:I certainly appreciate these photos, more than you can imagine. I am on the verge of beginning a similar project on the oldest existing GE 70 ton centercab, Ellwod Engineered Castings no. 6114B. The bottom of the cab walls are rotted away and will need rebuilding. The 6114B was used in the steel industry, and bears the scars of such service. I do not want to remove that battle damage, but do want to repair the rust damage.
Rick, thanks for the update! Will you please start a new thread here to keep us updated on this engine? This is the engine that was also at one time owned by New York Central, right?
  by JasonA
 
Long time since I have posted. Today we shot the entire car body with primer. 95% of the mechaincal work is complete. I am hoping to shoot the top coat by mid-April, and finish the project by the end of May.

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  by Otto Vondrak
 
JasonA wrote:Long time since I have posted. Today we shot the entire car body with primer. 95% of the mechaincal work is complete. I am hoping to shoot the top coat by mid-April, and finish the project by the end of May.
Outstanding! Hey, you seem to enjoy the tired iron from Erie, PA, you wanna come weld on our GE's in Rochester, NY? :-D
  by JasonA
 
We don't have a lot of choice. This will be our 2nd carded engine, and since we are now storing cars for 3 companies, plus our operations, we have to have a 2nd engine running. The GE would not have been my choice, but since we only have 4 locomotives, we are stuck with it. We have this, an ALCO S1, a Whitcomb 44 tonner, and a model 40. The 44 tonner runs, but can't handle a lot (we have moved up to 30 cars at at time), and the model 40 needs a complete overhaul, but it will move under its own power, kind of.

We really need a larger road switcher, but for now we will use what we have. The goal with the GE was to never have to go back and work on it, with the exception of the normal stuff. Whatever loco we come up with next will get the same treatment.

Jason
  by Otto Vondrak
 
I think you've certainly got something to be proud of, there. The repairs and rebuilding you've done should keep that engine on the road for quite some time.

-otto-
  by BERK44
 
Jason. Great job.The quality of your metal work really stands out when everything is in primer. What type of paint are you using on that engine?
  by Rick Rowlands
 
What happened to the photos? The transient nature of the Internet strikes again!
  by Otto Vondrak
 
Rick Rowlands wrote:What happened to the photos? The transient nature of the Internet strikes again!
It looks like the move to the new server may have severed the connection to the photos... Most unfortunate.
  by Rick Rowlands
 
Yes it is. That was the most thorough and useful documentation of a diesel locomotive's restoration on the Internet.
  by Otto Vondrak
 
Rick Rowlands wrote:Yes it is. That was the most thorough and useful documentation of a diesel locomotive's restoration on the Internet.
I'm sure the original poster still has the photos.