• Is there a gauge that will fit here?

  • Discussion related to everything about model railroading, from layout design and planning, to reviews of related model tools and equipment. Discussion includes O, S, HO, N and Z, as well as narrow gauge topics. Also includes discussion of traditional "toy train" and "collector" topics such as Lionel, American Flyer, Marx, and others. Also includes discussion of outdoor garden railways and live steamers.
Discussion related to everything about model railroading, from layout design and planning, to reviews of related model tools and equipment. Discussion includes O, S, HO, N and Z, as well as narrow gauge topics. Also includes discussion of traditional "toy train" and "collector" topics such as Lionel, American Flyer, Marx, and others. Also includes discussion of outdoor garden railways and live steamers.

Moderators: 3rdrail, Otto Vondrak, stilson4283

  by l008com
 
There isn't. I ended up googling around for a half hour in the middle of writing this post. It looks like the smallest scale (Z) has a minimum turning diameter of about 12". I have a 4.75 x 58" shelf I was hoping to stick a really small train on. But looks like that's not happening. Oh well. I'll post any way incase theres some special, non standard, even smaller gauge train set out there.

Image
  by jwhite07
 
Even in T Gauge (1:450) a 60mm radius loop would have about a diameter of about 5 inches, but that shelf might be a good place for a Z scale switching puzzle layout. No turnaround loop necessary then. If you really want continuous running, you could install a couple of removable or fold-down/swing out "wings" for the extra space needed for a loop. Better yet, build on a separate piece of lumber or plywood that is designed to sit atop the shelf when you want to run trains and can be removed and put away at other times.
  by scottychaos
 
I always thought it was amusing that whoever "named" Z-scale were probably thinking: "well, these are clearly the smallest model trains that will ever exist!! so we might as well just go to the end of the alphabet and use letter Z"
umm..yeah. Image

Scot
  by JamesRR
 
l008com wrote:There isn't. I ended up googling around for a half hour in the middle of writing this post. It looks like the smallest scale (Z) has a minimum turning diameter of about 12". I have a 4.75 x 58" shelf I was hoping to stick a really small train on. But looks like that's not happening. Oh well. I'll post any way incase theres some special, non standard, even smaller gauge train set out there.

Image

You could do a straight track and install a reversing unit, sending it back and forth. Even do a switching ladder type thing.
  by l008com
 
jwhite07 wrote:Even in T Gauge (1:450) a 60mm radius loop would have about a diameter of about 5 inches, but that shelf might be a good place for a Z scale switching puzzle layout. No turnaround loop necessary then. If you really want continuous running, you could install a couple of removable or fold-down/swing out "wings" for the extra space needed for a loop. Better yet, build on a separate piece of lumber or plywood that is designed to sit atop the shelf when you want to run trains and can be removed and put away at other times.
I've never even heard of T gauge. Looks very neat. I guess I need to find a bigger shelf somewhere :D
  by granton junction
 
T-scale (do not confuse with TT-scale) comes out of Japan I think. It is miniscule and smaller than Z-scale. A friend of mine once quipped that these very small scales should also come with a microscope! BTW TT refers to 'table top' and is still popular in Eastern Europe.
  by electricron
 
Bachmann's Auto Reversing set in N scale would be one of the choices you could use on this shelf - if you wanted continuous operations although it wouldn't be going round and round, just back and forth.
Another option is to go with a larger scale and use rolling roads to run a locomotive stationary on the shelf. In this care a huge steam locomotive would be very impressive. While the train may not actually go anywhere, it would like like it was. A moving backdrop behind the train, sort of like on old cartoons, will give the visual impression of going somewhere.
So, even a shelf as you proposed could be used to display an operating train, even with larger scales.
  by Rabid Transit
 
Just think...with a bunch of switchbacks, you could work your way UP, level by level. :-D
I always thought it was amusing that whoever "named" Z-scale were probably thinking: "well, these are clearly the smallest model trains that will ever exist!! so we might as well just go to the end of the alphabet and use letter Z"
umm..yeah. Image

Scot


So how soon do you think we'll see 1:900 scale through-the-rails-powered trains? :P


Note that there are 1:700 scale static (unpowered) train and vehicle kits intended as dockyard diorama accessories for ship models, and there are 1:900 scale simulated train sets, running in a continuous loop via a motorized conveyor mechanism. http://www.tiny-trains.net/product/14X248DS" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false; I haven't seen any of these "Tiny Trains" layouts other than online myself, so I can't vouch for quality.