• Odor-free Dullcote alternative?

  • Discussion related to everything about model railroading, from layout design and planning, to reviews of related model tools and equipment. Discussion includes O, S, HO, N and Z, as well as narrow gauge topics. Also includes discussion of traditional "toy train" and "collector" topics such as Lionel, American Flyer, Marx, and others. Also includes discussion of outdoor garden railways and live steamers.
Discussion related to everything about model railroading, from layout design and planning, to reviews of related model tools and equipment. Discussion includes O, S, HO, N and Z, as well as narrow gauge topics. Also includes discussion of traditional "toy train" and "collector" topics such as Lionel, American Flyer, Marx, and others. Also includes discussion of outdoor garden railways and live steamers.

Moderators: 3rdrail, Otto Vondrak, stilson4283

  by Death Star
 
Just finished chalk weathering a CSX hopper car and finished it off with some dullcoate and forgot how stinky and smelly it was and now I am trying to find some non smelly/odor free alternatives that would do the same thing as dullcoate. Any ideas?
  by Backshophoss
 
There might be a water based version in the Model Master line of military colors(testors)
The shutdown of Floquil and Polyscale lines is a pain to the entire Hobby. :( :(
  by lvvlrr
 
If any product was odor free it would be made out of an "environmentally friendly" material that would break down and wear out after a year.
Honestly anything "green" usually sucks.

I take my projects outside on a nice day, spray them there and leave them out for a few hours for the vapors to evaporate.
  by Otto Vondrak
 
Death Star wrote:Just finished chalk weathering a CSX hopper car and finished it off with some dullcoate and forgot how stinky and smelly it was and now I am trying to find some non smelly/odor free alternatives that would do the same thing as dullcoate. Any ideas?
Anything that involves solvents will have some sort of odor, some more offensive than others. Whenever using any spray-on finishes, always work in a WELL-VENTILATED AREA, this means outdoors, or a room with a fan that vents to the outside, or a spray booth, or a garage with the doors open... If you must spray in the basement or attic, find a way to vent the fumes outside and keep the fresh air flowing.

Just a friendly reminder from someone who has killed way too many brain cells over the years in the layout room :-)

-otto-
  by Desertdweller
 
You might try spraying on a thinned water-based acrylic varnish. These are available in matte, satin, and gloss finish at craft stores.

Les