• RR workwear: Discussed here!

  • General discussion about working in the railroad industry. Industry employers are welcome to post openings here.
General discussion about working in the railroad industry. Industry employers are welcome to post openings here.

Moderator: thebigc

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  by gp80mac
 
I don't think it exists. If it lets air and sweat out, it will let water in.

So either you wear heavy stuff (and get drenched in sweat in summertime) or you wear lighter stuff and get soaked by rain in heavy downpours. Best solution? Have a change of clothes for when you're done playing in the rain.
  by jr145
 
I've found police rain jackets to be the best.
  by d0c69
 
Thanks for the quick replies. I have another general question.

what would a conductor out of Philly or one in the northeast in general carry on any given day. How big should my grip be.

Thanks!!!
  by jr145
 
It varies by your railroad and how much crap they give you to carry. Our timetable uses 8 1/2 x 11 paper so its miserable to carry. But its usually your timetable, operating rules guide, hazmat guidebook, lantern, switch keys, form D book (Movement permit form book, I'm sure there's some equivalent there) and whatever other junk you want to carry with you that you think you may need. Everyone's different. I've seen some with just backpacks, to others with bags as big as suitcases.
  by gp80mac
 
Post by jr145 » Fri Sep 09, 2011 10:50 pm
I've found police rain jackets to be the best.


Funny you mention that. I'm about to order the very thing.
  by scharnhorst
 
jr145 wrote:It varies by your railroad and how much crap they give you to carry. Our timetable uses 8 1/2 x 11 paper so its miserable to carry. But its usually your timetable, operating rules guide, hazmat guidebook, lantern, switch keys, form D book (Movement permit form book, I'm sure there's some equivalent there) and whatever other junk you want to carry with you that you think you may need. Everyone's different. I've seen some with just backpacks, to others with bags as big as suitcases.

Conrail used Form D after CSX Took over its now called an ECS form?
  by mick
 
The best thing to do is try to stay out of the rain in the first place. An old head told me a long time ago, "A good brakeman is never cold, wet or hungry".
  by Chuck84
 
What do you recommend bringing to the REDI? I leave Oct 3rd and I'm not familiar with ga climate in the fall.
  by gboy8720
 
Im originally from Georgia and the fall is still pretty warm but has its chilly days. I wouldnt be to worried about being cold but mornings can get alittle chilly. I would take pants, short sleeve shirts and some thin long sleeve shirts as well. Also a hoody or some kind of wind breaker and a rain coat unless you don't mind getting wet. I would rather be over prepared than under.
  by mispeed
 
What do you guys/gals think about this boot... Danner® 8" Quarry™ GTX® 400-Gram Safety-Toe Work Boots - cabela's item: IK-813857
Anything that would work better/cheaper/more durable or comfortable for a cold rough winter ?! I am also a bit worried about ruining such a nice pair of boots. I tried them at the store and they were very comfortable if a bit heavy.

here is another boot I was interested in that haven't had the opportunity to try: Cabela's 400-Gram Steel Toe Lace-To-Toe Boots.

Thanks
  by jr145
 
For conductors and other "on the ground" crafts railroad use boots have a life of about 6 months. If you get a year out of them you're lucky. Ballast chews the bottoms of the boots up like you wouldn't believe. And if you work in a cold climate, snow will tear up the front of the boots.

I've had good luck with Carolina boots. http://www.shoeshackonline.com/carolina-mens-ca7019 They have a good, strong defined heel, something thats a must, if not required on the railroad. The thinsulate keeps your feet nice and warm. And the fact that it is 10" gives you greater protection against rolling your ankle.

One other thing, DO NOT get steel toe boots. Not only will it be very cold, but everything on the railroad is so heavy that if it does get caught it will pinch the steel down and will cut your toes off.
  by jr145
 
No, look at the heel on the boot in the link I posted. You need to be able to lock your heel onto ladders, steps, etc.. so that you do not fall. Its too easy to slip with the other type of heel on your boot.
  by mick
 
The Danner Quarry is a great boot, they can be re-soled for about 60 bucks, and they have a composite toe so it will not get cold like steel will. Of course safety toes will not protect your feet from a wheel rolling over it or something like that, nothing will, that's just common sense. They will protect your TOES from minor things like a falling knuckle or a marker, or kicking a rail or a tie, not the rest of your foot, for that you can get Met-guard boots which also protect the rest of the top part of your foot, though I have never seen anyone on the RR wearing these. The military-style boots you showed are not good because they don't have a 90 degree heel, but like I have said on several posts, beware of Logger-style boots, in my personal experience they caused knee problems over a period of time. As soon as I stopped wearing them, the knee problems went away. As for winter boots, anyone who works in the Northeast or Upper Midwest where it gets really cold will tell you to get heavily insulated boots like 1200 gram Thinsulate or more.
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