• Impact of Precision Scheduled Railroading on the Industry

  • For topics on Class I and II passenger and freight operations more general in nature and not specifically related to a specific railroad with its own forum.
For topics on Class I and II passenger and freight operations more general in nature and not specifically related to a specific railroad with its own forum.

Moderator: Jeff Smith

  by J.D. Lang
 
Expressed otherwise, "how has the nature and scope of the industry changed so much in the past thirty years to make operating practices being implemented today that they could not have been implemented earlier"?
I think that the advancement in technology has a lot to do with it. DPU's allows longer trains to be handled better and safer. AI software can better track car movement and allow better trip planning and train makeup and routing. On board diagnostics can relay real time locomotive performance and with trip optimizing can improve fuel/wear on motive power. Just a few things that I can think of that technology can make efficient use of assets that weren't available 30 yrs. ago.
  by Gilbert B Norman
 
Wonderful insight, Mr. Lang. I thank you and repect the thoughts you bring to this site.
  by GOLDEN-ARM
 
J.D. Lang wrote: Fri Mar 06, 2020 9:56 am
Expressed otherwise, "how has the nature and scope of the industry changed so much in the past thirty years to make operating practices being implemented today that they could not have been implemented earlier"?
I think that the advancement in technology has a lot to do with it. DPU's allows longer trains to be handled better and safer. AI software can better track car movement and allow better trip planning and train makeup and routing. On board diagnostics can relay real time locomotive performance and with trip optimizing can improve fuel/wear on motive power. Just a few things that I can think of that technology can make efficient use of assets that weren't available 30 yrs. ago.

i'm pretty sure distributed power has been around, since the mid 60's. this makes the technology 55 years old, not 30. i used to watch southern railway trains headed from inman yard to greenville, with mid train helpers shoving hard through chamblee, with their radio slave boxcar coupled to the mid train dp power. i also remember the aci kartrak barcodes on the cars, from around the same time period, until the advent of the new microchipped aei tags became the norm. computers are the biggest change i've witnessed, allowing electronic transmission of data, instead of burdening crews with hundreds of copies of weighbills, to be handed off at each spot the corresponding car(s) were set out.

trip optimizers, fuel savers, etc., are junk technology. any small savings seen from these systems, are overshadowed by acquisition cost, installation, maintenance, and upgrading/replacement of failed equipment. a properly trained, and supervised engineer, can see the same "savings" the technology brings without the added costs.he's already in the cab, all he needs is the training and the motivation to do it. :P
  by Engineer Spike
 
The systems of the 1960s weren't as complex, nor as flexible as modern technology. I went to work for a large Canadian carrier 20 years ago. At the time, new AC locomotives were purchased, and used starting in the Rocky Mountains. The former remote control SD40-2 locomotives released from western service had migrated east. Certain units could be used as leaders, while others were set up for remote. The system was large, as the road ordered the SD40-2s with longer noes to house the gear. Therefor, there were dedicated units for either lead or remote service. Some roads used special cars, or former locomotive bodies to house the remote gear.

Now the use of electronic brake valves, and microprocessor remote control gear is just about universally applied to modern power. Just about any unit can lead, or any can trail. There is the ability to control multiple consists within a train. I'm not sure, but I believe the old systems could only control one remote consist.
  by Gilbert B Norman
 
https://s29755.pcdn.co/news/commentary- ... -psr-again

I must say, I'm wary of that web address, for "I read somewhere" that tags such as co are used on the Dark Web.

So far, my pbone has not been infected; but if any if our Geeks around here such as Mr. Primrose believe this link represents a threat, the sooner this is killed, the happier I be

Here is Fair Use:
.The five principles, in case you did not memorize them are:

Service
Cost Control
Asset Utilization
Safety
Passionate People
Now the service part is important. Because without customers, Harrison admitted there is no railroad business.

Service has a simple definition, according to Hunter: “Service means doing what we say we’ll do.”
I hope my concerns are deemed unfounded, as this article represents a concise summary regarding what Precision Railroading is supposed to be.

Of course, it figures that some of the comments are "not exactly" the cheerleading squad.
  by chrisf
 
Gilbert B Norman wrote: Sat May 16, 2020 6:17 am https://s29755.pcdn.co/news/commentary- ... -psr-again

I must say, I'm wary of that web address, for "I read somewhere" that tags such as co are used on the Dark Web.
There’s nothing “dark” about that link. It’s part of what’s known as a CDN. In any case, here’s the primary link: https://www.freightwaves.com/news/comme ... -psr-again
  by Gilbert B Norman
 
Good to know, Mr. Chris F, that my concerns were unfounded - and that my Galaxy S-9 remains secure, even if both Samsung and Verizon are of mind to have me rid of that relic. Dreadful; it's paid off.
  by Engineer Spike
 
The DP technology and all the other good stuff is great until it doesn't work right. My carrier has been skipping running trains on certain days, resulting in a monster every other day. Much of this has been possible because of the suspension of passenger trains due to COVID-19. Recently we had about 22k tons, 12k feet, 2x1 locomotives. After a stout, we left, and the DP started low loading. soon it totally dropped its load. Luckily it was a nice day, and I was able to keep going. We had another set out, and the Trainmaster climbed on the remote, and was talking to the shop about what to do. After failing at a repair, it was decided to cut everything off from the remote back. This was because there is a good sized hill on the last leg, which we probably couldn't make.

The problems were that it was a dry day, so the remaining locomotives could produce full power. They always try to max the engines out, but if the rail conditions are not perfect, then they scratch their heads about what went wrong. As far as the passengers go, we have a 90 mile gap as to places where we would clear. Amy problems, and the whole line would be plugged. There is no contingency if there is a problem.

The last bit has to do with what could happen IF........ One parted air hose cold cause hours of delay just fixing the problem and inspecting the train. What happens when a town is cut off, and an emergency vehicle can't get through? As usual, the railroad sets things us half assed. they have no way around a situation. If my 12,000' train had parted hoses, the nearest person who could have helped might have been 2 hours away.
  by Wayside
 
Good piece of writing by David Schanoes.

https://www.railwayage.com/freight/psr- ... y-the-way/

"E. Hunter Harrison has morphed, post-mortem, from a chainsaw wielding, asset stripping, customer repelling, hedge fund darling to being an innovator with a capital I, a genius with a capital G, an entrepreneur with a capital E, and a hedge fund darling with capital D. Either/or, or all of the above, Hunter is approaching something like sainthood in our great Railroad Church of the Operating Ratio."
  by Gilbert B Norman
 
Great to see some "good stuff" in Railway Age again, instead of all the passenger train advocacy dribble they have been spouting about of late.