• Some images from swiss private railways

  • Discussion about railroad topics everywhere outside of North America.
Discussion about railroad topics everywhere outside of North America.

Moderators: Komachi, David Benton

  by Benny
 
The private (or, better, non state owned) swiss railways always have been one of my focuses of interest. There is an incredible variety of trains, lines, gauges and operations and some years ago there were various pieces coming from the first half of 20th century, but old or new they were all perfectly efficient, clean and giving an excellent service.

The Rhaetian Railway (Rhatische Bahn, RhB) is a metric gauge network of mountain lines in the south-east of Switzerland that run in magnificent sceneries. The lines are, in the major part, electrified at 11000 V single phase current but there are some lines using DC.
This first image shows a single phase railcar doing a local service between Spinas (at the southern entrance of the Albula tunnel) and Samedan in August 10, 1991. ABe 4/4 502 was built in 1939 and was nicknamed "flying rhaetier" because of good acceleration (for the time) that was useful in stopping services.
DN2r ABe 4-4 502 RhB in corsa tra Spinas e Bever il 10 agosto 1991.jpg
The town of Aigle, in the Vaud canton, is the starting point of three meter gauge railways, different in kind of electrifying and rack.
The Aigle-Leysin (AL) connect the SBB station of Aigle, on the plain, with the college town of Leysin, on a peak, with an adhesion route between the main station and the depot in the periphery of Aigle, and then using Abt rack and pinion system until the upper end.
The second shot, taken in August 1987, shows BDeh 2/4 203, built in the '40s, coming in Leysin Village station; the last stretch to Leysin Grand Hotel is on a tunnel. Note the décor of the station building.
DN6r BDeh 2-4 203 AL in arrivo a Leysin Village l´8 agosto 1987.jpg
And now a great classic. The RhB always had electric locos inspired to the bigger sisters of SBB and this had been the case also with the famous "crocodiles". With the coming of newer and powerful locos the baby crocodiles were downgraded to minor services but these pioneers were always useful and soldier on.
Here is Ge6/6' 415, from 1925, with a mixed train crossing the Cinuos" viaduct on the Scuol Tarasp-Samedan line, still under 11000 V. The photo was taken in October 15, 1991 and you can see the magnificent color tones of the trees in autumn.
DN7r Ge 6-6´ 415 RhB con misto in transito sul viadotto Cinuos 2 il 15 ottobre 1991.jpg
Nice? Next time something more

Ciao :wink:
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  by philipmartin
 
That's beautiful stuff, Benny. Are those baby crocodiles still in service?
I've mentioned here before that Aigle (eagle,) and Bex are the spots where you could get trains to Villars, where a Belgian aunt and uncle of mine had a vacation chalet.
I'll also repeat the story that during WWII the Germans occupying Belgium offered them permission to go to their chalet, and they said "thanks, but no thanks." When the Americans replaced the Germans, people who had accepted the German's kind offer were treated as collaborators.
Ride the cog railway from Bex to Villars. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jnr1d9EbWrg" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Bi5pk2VyTs" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
  by Benny
 
There are still two baby crocodiles in working order: 414 and 415. They are now historic locos and used in special occasions or for charter trains. RhB has various items of historic material, between them the magnificent Ge 4/6 353, smaller sister of SBB Be 4/6.
You are correct in indicating Bex as the starting point for the ascent to Villars (and the follow on to the Col de Bretaye) but from Aigle there is no connection. Bex-Villars-Bretaye (BVB) railway too had very interesting motive power, varying from trams to rack railcars and locos. In Villars remise there was a small rack loco from around 1910.
Now the three railways from Aigle and BVB have a common management named Transports Publics du Chablais.

Ciao :wink:
  by philipmartin
 
Benny- I'm certainly glad that a couple of the baby crocks are preserved. It bothers me a great deal that the Great Western Railway in England scrapped their eight foot single (my avatar) that they had preserved because they needed the space it was occupying.
It's about forty years since I made my visit to Villars, but at that time you could get there from Aigle; I probably did it.
I'm not sure which line this spectacular photo was taken on. Photo : © Michel Fornerod.
Andiamo!
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  by Benny
 
philipmartin wrote: I'm not sure which line this spectacular photo was taken on. Photo : © Michel Fornerod.
Andiamo!
The photo was taken on the Aigle-Le Sepey-Les Diablerets (ASD) in the stretch between Les Planches and the final terminus.
The railcar is one of the original ABDe 's from the opening (1913) and is doing the "transormonan" tourist service.
This metric railway is electrified at 1350 V DC and is pure adhesion.

Va bene, andiamo! Però dove? Al ristorante? Paghi tu? Allora andiamo di corsa!!!

Ciao :wink:
  by george matthews
 
I think I have used the Leysin line in the 1960s when I went to visit my parents who were on holiday in a hotel at the top.

In general: the 'private' lines are not what Americans think of as investor owned, but are companies owned by the cantons - local government.
  by Benny
 
george matthews wrote:In general: the 'private' lines are not what Americans think of as investor owned, but are companies owned by the cantons - local government.
Correct, this is the reason because I wrote of "non state owned" railways. Nearly all born as real private ones but along their history they were bought by local authorities (cantons, town councils etc.)

Ciao :wink:
  by philipmartin
 
Benny wrote:
philipmartin wrote: I'm not sure which line this spectacular photo was taken on. Photo : © Michel Fornerod.
Andiamo!
The photo was taken on the Aigle-Le Sepey-Les Diablerets (ASD) in the stretch between Les Planches and the final terminus.
The railcar is one of the original ABDe 's from the opening (1913) and is doing the "transormonan" tourist service.
This metric railway is electrified at 1350 V DC and is pure adhesion.

Va bene, andiamo! Però dove? Al ristorante? Paghi tu? Allora andiamo di corsa!!!

Ciao :wink:
Benny - you are a real expert on these Swiss rail lines. I appreciate your sharing your knowledge with us.
As for "pero dove?," "al ristorante" sounds fine, for a bowl of minestrone, with grated parmigiano cheese, and tortone for desert. "Paghi tu?," if that means "am I going to pay?; we have a word in English that describes me very well: "cheap."
A dios.
  by Benny
 
philipmartin wrote:It's about forty years since I made my visit to Villars, but at that time you could get there from Aigle
I want not to be a know-all but in the Schweers/Wall railway atlas of Switzerland there is no trace of an ancient connection between Aigle and Villars, neither by rail nor by funicular or cableway. The only manner to go, apart returning to Bex by SBB, can be going by the Aigle-Ollon-Monthey-Champery (AOMC) until Ollon and then by postbus to Villars. Sometimes our memory makes jokes.

Ciao :wink:
  by Benny
 
philipmartin wrote:As for "pero dove?," "al ristorante" sounds fine, for a bowl of minestrone, with grated parmigiano cheese, and tortone for desert. "Paghi tu?," if that means "am I going to pay?; we have a word in English that describes me very well: "cheap."
A dios.
You are nearly correct. The right translation is "OK, let's go!" "But where?" "To the restaurant?" "Do you pay?" "So let's go very quickly!"

Ciao :wink:
  by David Benton
 
On one of the videos I watched following your links, they loaded a large garbage bin ( dumpster on wheels ) onto the front of the train. It seemed to obstruct the drivers view somewhat, but they were only doing 20 km'hr. The station was called GOLF, situated on a golf course.(what a coincidence!).
My enduring memory of Swiss railways is the large FART signs.
  by philipmartin
 
Benny wrote:Sometimes our memory makes jokes.

Ciao :wink:
I don't know what to say. My memory of my aunt telling me Ailge or Bex, along with a translation of "Aigle" is good, and I did it. Now, besides your looking it up, all I can find on Google is "no direct rail line between Aigle and Villars.
Au revoir
  by Benny
 
David Benton wrote:On one of the videos I watched following your links, they loaded a large garbage bin ( dumpster on wheels ) onto the front of the train. It seemed to obstruct the drivers view somewhat, but they were only doing 20 km'hr. The station was called GOLF, situated on a golf course.(what a coincidence!).
In general, cog railways put the powered vehicle at the lower end for safety reasons. In case of multiple units an eventual vehicle is normally put at the upper end and, sometimes, if driver's view is obstructed another railroader stays in the upper vehicle using handbrake and gestures to instruct the driver.

In Switzerland railways are largely used to transport the collected garbage to disposal points.

Ciao :wink:
  by philipmartin
 
Benny wrote:
In Switzerland railways are largely used to transport the collected garbage to disposal points.

Ciao :wink:
We do that on on the railway I work for. We call them "commuters."

(Message to my boss: just kidding.)
  by Benny
 
Ha ha ha!
It's the same in Italy. Lots and lots of words about improvement of public transport but finally people is treated as livestock for slaughter.

Ciao :wink: