• Texas Central HSR (Houston - DFW Dallas Fort Worth)

  • General discussion of passenger rail proposals and systems not otherwise covered in the specific forums in this category, including high speed rail.
General discussion of passenger rail proposals and systems not otherwise covered in the specific forums in this category, including high speed rail.

Moderators: mtuandrew, gprimr1

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  by mtuandrew
 
Hard not to politicize this when every respondent has -R next to their name :wink: Though for this, I think that reflects their rural constituencies as much as their party affiliation. Fifty years earlier I suppose their forebears would have lobbied against a superhighway with no exits in their communities as well.

In contrast, the Texas state executives and US Senators seem to still be supporting (or at least neutral about) this project as long as it is privately-developed.
  by Jeff Smith
 
https://www.globalrailwayreview.com/new ... struction/
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The construction of the high-speed rail line in Texas by Webuild, formerly Salini Impregilo, took a step closer to beginning with a ruling by the 13th Court of Appeals of Texas in favour of Texas Central, the project’s developer.

The Court held that Texas Central was both a railroad company and interurban electric railway, giving it the right to survey access and the use of eminent domain along the planned 379km-long trajectory of the line. The Final Environmental Impact Statement on the project is to be published by the Federal Railroad Administration in May 2020.

The project, whose value totals approximately $20 billion – $14 billion of which for the civil works – would be an important investment for Texas and a major boost to the state’s economy, the kind of stimulus proposed by President Donald Trump. This would conservatively lead to an estimated $36 billion in economic benefits state-wide during the next 25 years, including the creation of 10,000 jobs per year during peak construction and 1,500 permanent jobs when fully operational.

The project, which is ready to start, represents a strategic initiative for the state in terms of business and employment along the supply chain in a key area of the United States that has been struck by the sharp drop in oil prices.
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  by Pensyfan19
 
Great to hear! :-D
It is also important to note that a few days ago, the Court finally ruled Texas Central Railway a "railroad" and an "interurban electric railroad". Pretty interesting that the court ruled the latter. Does this mean Texas Central is now an interurban railway like South Shore Line?! ;)
  by bdawe
 
Pensyfan19 wrote: Mon May 11, 2020 11:56 am Great to hear! :-D
It is also important to note that a few days ago, the Court finally ruled Texas Central Railway a "railroad" and an "interurban electric railroad". Pretty interesting that the court ruled the latter. Does this mean Texas Central is now an interurban railway like South Shore Line?! ;)
clearly it means that we will have downtown station locations by way of street-running, right?
  by Pensyfan19
 
bdawe wrote: Mon May 11, 2020 12:17 pm
Pensyfan19 wrote: Mon May 11, 2020 11:56 am Great to hear! :-D
It is also important to note that a few days ago, the Court finally ruled Texas Central Railway a "railroad" and an "interurban electric railroad". Pretty interesting that the court ruled the latter. Does this mean Texas Central is now an interurban railway like South Shore Line?! ;)
clearly it means that we will have downtown station locations by way of street-running, right?
HECK YEAH!!! :-D :-D :P

https://i.ytimg.com/vi/1dfSrjeY0MQ/hqdefault.jpg

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1dfSrjeY0MQ
  by Jeff Smith
 
https://theleadernews.com/feds-close-to ... let-train/
The Texas-based company that wants to construct a high-speed railway between Houston and Dallas is on the verge of clearing a significant hurdle after the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) released its final environmental impact assessment for the project last Friday, May 29.

Two months earlier, the FRA published a notice of proposed minimal safety standards for Texas Central, the Dallas company that plans to import Japanese technology and has been waiting for the FRA to finalize both sets of guidelines for the domestic railway.

FRA spokesperson Warren Flatau said earlier this week that the agency continues to evaluate public comments regarding the environmental impact and proposed rules for Texas Central’s project and expects to issue a final decision this summer. That next step figures to be a formality, according to Texas Central CEO Carlos Aguilar, who said the company has invested more than $65 million toward receiving the go-ahead from the FRA, which published its initial environmental impact statement in December 2017.
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Among the property Texas Central has secured, Aguilar said, are the planned stations in Houston and Dallas as a well as a midpoint station in Grimes County. The former Northwest Mall site at the intersection of U.S. 290 and Loop 610 is earmarked for the Houston station.
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