• SEHSR Southeast High Speed Rail Corridor

  • General discussion of passenger rail proposals and systems not otherwise covered in the specific forums in this category, including high speed rail.
General discussion of passenger rail proposals and systems not otherwise covered in the specific forums in this category, including high speed rail.

Moderators: mtuandrew, gprimr1

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  by Riverduckexpress
 
While discussions on this corridor comes up often, I don't think anybody posted this anywhere; I just found it recently myself. Last September, Georgia DOT quietly released a Tier 1 Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) for the Charlotte-Atlanta segment of SEHSR. Tentatively stretching from Charlotte Gateway Station to Hartsfield-Jackson Airport, GDOT has narrowed down their options to three alignments: The existing Norfolk Southern Piedmont Division line used by the Crescent (Southern Crescent), improved to trim travel times; a high-speed ROW running down I-85, and a brand-new high-speed 'greenfield' ROW. The public commenting period has long passed. Next, FRA and GDOT will prepare a Tier 1 Final EIS with the alignment they've chosen (hard to imagine they won't pick the Southern Crescent route, especially given the rest of SEHSR), and after that the Tier 2 environmental review can begin. The Tier 2 environmental review will be more detailed, focusing on things like station locations and picking between two options for entering the Atlanta area (Norfolk Southern's line, or CSX's line). No telling when those will be.

Map of the three alignments and the two Atlanta approaches (yanked from this Powerpoint)
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Comparison of the three options (from the Alternatives chapter, pg. 44)
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  by Jeff Smith
 
Given the cost disparities, they're going to have to make a value judgment: which proposal gives more bang for the buck? The I-85 proposal is very expensive compared to Greenfield. The "Southern Crescent" provides little ROI (return on investment); it's basically a net loss. Is the ROI on Greenfield realistic? In the other thread, we talked about a station at Hartsfield-Jackson; given the frequencies in Greenfield, it would be worth it.
  by RRspatch
 
Jeff Smith wrote: Mon Jun 01, 2020 8:00 am Given the cost disparities, they're going to have to make a value judgment: which proposal gives more bang for the buck? The I-85 proposal is very expensive compared to Greenfield. The "Southern Crescent" provides little ROI (return on investment); it's basically a net loss. Is the ROI on Greenfield realistic? In the other thread, we talked about a station at Hartsfield-Jackson; given the frequencies in Greenfield, it would be worth it.
If you look the three proposals even more closely this is what you'll find -

NS route is basically the path of least resistance. The railroad is all ready there. Adding a third and perhaps forth track wouldn't be that hard in most places.

The I-85 proposal would probably require a tunnel the last 20 or 30 miles into Atlanta. Going north there isn't enough room in the medium strip until you get past the I-85/I-985 split. South of that point I-85 is 8 lanes wide with buildings flanking both sides.

The Greenfield proposal would be cheaper to build construction wise but that's only after fighting NIMBY's for 10 to 20 years. Look at all the fun Texas Central has had here in Texas.
  by Billybob
 
Is this still supposed to head to Atlanta?

How is that going to work when they don't have a proper terminal?

They were thinking about one in the Gulch area but they just gave away rights to some big real estate outfit for development.
  by scratchyX1
 
Billybob wrote: Wed Sep 16, 2020 1:40 pm Is this still supposed to head to Atlanta?

How is that going to work when they don't have a proper terminal?

They were thinking about one in the Gulch area but they just gave away rights to some big real estate outfit for development.
Will there be a demand for a big office complex, post covid?
  by electricron
 
Billybob wrote: Wed Sep 16, 2020 1:40 pm Is this still supposed to head to Atlanta?
How is that going to work when they don't have a proper terminal?
They were thinking about one in the Gulch area but they just gave away rights to some big real estate outfit for development.
There is not a valid location in downtown Atlanta that I am aware of. So I expect a new HSR terminal will be built on the outskirts of Atlanta like Texas Central proposal in Houston, or at the huge airport for Atlanta like Brightline in Orlando.
When you get down to the nitty gritty in Atlanta, only MARTA rapid rail transit exists today in downtown Atlanta, even Amtrak’s Crescent skips it. All the HSR really needs to reach is a MARTA station on either the west, east, north or south lines.
  by west point
 
One proposal was to terminate at the ATL airport. There is room along the CSX ROW where a people mover crosses ovr the CSX.
  by lpetrich
 
I found that article also: NCDOT to buy CSX rail line between Raleigh and Ridgeway | Raleigh News & Observer

It's a Federal grant of $47.5 M, and it will be for buying the CSX S-line between Raleigh and Ridgeway, near the NC-VA state line.
Last December, Virginia struck a deal to buy 65 miles of the CSX rail corridor from the state line north to near Petersburg. CSX also agreed to allow NCDOT to eventually acquire about 10 miles of railroad right-of-way in Warren County, between Ridgeway and the Virginia state line.
Tracks are still present between Raleigh and Ridgeway, though they were removed between Ridgeway and Petersburg.
  by lpetrich
 
Long Bridge rail project between D.C. and Virginia barrels ahead | Headlines | insidenova.com - I'm guessing that this might be a good place for that article.
With the state budget in tatters and commuter levels at record lows, now might hardly seem the right moment for Virginia to embark upon a $1.9 billion rail project. However, the recent conclusion of the Long Bridge’s environmental impact study has cleared the way for the commonwealth to do just that.

The plan to add a second set of tracks to the 116-year-old rail crossing between D.C. and Virginia will allow the state to realize the full potential of the $3.7 billion deal with CSX Gov. Ralph Northam struck last December.
  by njtmnrrbuff
 
Yes, the Long Bridge project is a vital stepping stone to the Southeast High Speed Rail Project. It will help provide capacity for the almost future hourly schedule of Amtrak trains heading to Richmond as well as those four new Carolinians that will start running eventually. These will likely travel on the upgraded S-Line from Petersburg to Raleigh. Might I add that NC got the approval to acquire the S-Line from the NC/VA State Line to Raleigh. Here is a recent article that mentions that. https://amp.newsobserver.com/news/local ... 41010.html When traveling from the population centers of the Northeast down to the Southeast, this will help shave off a few hours off of the schedule. The routing by way of Rocky Mount and Wilson takes too along when taking the current Carolinian and Silver Star.
  by gokeefe
 

orulz wrote:North Carolina just made a deal and got a grant to acquire its portion of the S-line.
Wow. They are really moving right along. Impressive progress. The EIS being completed seems to have triggered a lot of this activity.

Sent from my Pixel 2 XL using Tapatalk

  by west point
 
gokeefe wrote: Sat Sep 19, 2020 7:30 pm
orulz wrote:North Carolina just made a deal and got a grant to acquire its portion of the S-line.
Wow. They are really moving right along. Impressive progress. The EIS being completed seems to have triggered a lot of this activity.

Sent from my Pixel 2 XL using Tapatalk
According to this article there might be the section Ridgeway - NC / VA state border that is not defined.. VA has the option at present but in no way would want that section. Probably can be worked out without too much paperwork.

At present the route from WASH - Raleigh can only be HrSR. That is because the 1st street tunnel is too short for CAT and the proposed second tunnel will have to be built.
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