• Toms River Industrial Track!

  • Pertaining to all railroading subjects, past and present, in New Jersey
Pertaining to all railroading subjects, past and present, in New Jersey

Moderator: David

  • 127 posts
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 9
  by radioboy
 
Here's two shots of the Toms River Pennsylvania railroad station. This is just east of where the Parkway interchange is. The tracks are now Route 9. The station still stands as a private home behind some trees. The car is a PRR Doodlebug which ran on the Barnegat Branch. These trips were slowly phased out and replaced by motor coaches.

(Images are from RailPictures.net, copyright John Dziobko. I cropped the copyright notice because I had been using them as computer wallpaper and no longer have the original.)
  by GSC
 
Great shots! Have to look for that house.

The doodlebug and RPO is a classic shot.
  by CJPat
 
The Station is located on Haliard Ave, South Toms River. It was moved only about 30-50 feetoff of what is now the RT 9/Parkway Access and rotated 90 degrees to face the Haliard. You can see the Station Building here (now used as a house).
http://www.bing.com/maps/default.aspx?v ... &encType=1
  by Pinewald Station
 
I think that freight station like structure we talked about Gary is near there too.
  by GSC
 
A rather substantial structure, I would have loved to see it moved.

Still wondering about the "pump house" along the Rt 9 connector, it is definitely railroad-influenced in design. I don't think the freight shed in the above pics is it, the shape is different, although, you never know.
  by GSC
 
I've often wondered why CNJ and PRR built their stations an inconvenient distance from each other. Passengers must have needed to transfer sometimes. Toms River and Freehold and Manasquan come to mind, a few block hike from one to the other, although Farmingdale had a joint CNJ-PRR "union" station right at the diamond crossing. Whitings had a "union" station as well, CNJ-PRR-Tuckerton RR.
  by Duff
 
GSC wrote:The 4-lane Route 9 spur from the Parkway to the Rt 166 "circle" was once the Pennsy ROW, I believe the north side of the road. There is a pumping station structure along the way that looks VERY railroady, maybe someone knows what that building is/was.
I'm over that way all the time and I never noticed anything like that. Now I'll make it a point to look for it. Did you say it was on the right heading towards the parkway?
  by Pinewald Station
 
Duff wrote:
GSC wrote:The 4-lane Route 9 spur from the Parkway to the Rt 166 "circle" was once the Pennsy ROW, I believe the north side of the road. There is a pumping station structure along the way that looks VERY railroady, maybe someone knows what that building is/was.
I'm over that way all the time and I never noticed anything like that. Now I'll make it a point to look for it. Did you say it was on the right heading towards the parkway?
Yeah it kind of blends in on your right side. I wouldn't have noticed unless Gary had brought it up!
  by radioboy
 
GSC wrote:I've often wondered why CNJ and PRR built their stations an inconvenient distance from each other. Passengers must have needed to transfer sometimes. Toms River and Freehold and Manasquan come to mind, a few block hike from one to the other, although Farmingdale had a joint CNJ-PRR "union" station right at the diamond crossing. Whitings had a "union" station as well, CNJ-PRR-Tuckerton RR.
The PRR crossed the CNJ Main at Whiting, and then crossed the Barnegat Branch at Beachwood. But at the same time, remember that we're talking maybe a maximum of 5 trains per day. There probably weren't too many people coming down from Jersey City, switching to a Doodlebug or motorcoach on the Barnegat Branch, and then taking the PRR over to Seaside.

After the Beachwood stop opened in 1915, the town didn't take off as a summer resort. The station was eventually built by the township because neither railroad wanted to spend the money on it.
  by RailsEast
 
A few more pics from the late '80s; these are courtesy of Mike (Pinewald Station), who requested that I scan & post these images recorded by him. I'll let Mike fill in the details regarding dates, and any additional info he may have.
(By the way, Mike, absolutely great shot of 7912!)

http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/3871873076/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/3871873810/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/3871874580/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/3871872320/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/3871087849/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/3871087013/
  by Kaback9
 
Those 7900 series Geeps are not even on the roster anymore sold off in the 80's some working on UP now(maybe in storage). Great shots! Thanks for sharing and the GE unit man I wish we still got those out of Browns I remember as a young kid seeing them come down the Freehold Seconday(now Industrial).
  by Pinewald Station
 
Thanks for scanning and posting, Chris. Computer issues right now....The pic of the hoppers was taken out of the front door of the building I used to work in. Talk about spoiled...Cr spent a lot of money refurbing the track and Rte 37 crossing only to have Ciba Geigy lost due to environmental issues. Builder's General is pretty much right there where the engines are parked. They used to get a center beam or two and a couple boxcars a month. The MOW equip was neat to see especially the gon-mounted backhoe loader with a grapple to pick up old ties.There are probably other pics out there but I would guess this is some of the last major train traffic in Toms River ! Thanks again Chris....
  by Ken W2KB
 
radioboy wrote:
Pinewald Station wrote:They would have to rebuild the bridge over Cedar Creek to get the Rail Trail up into Bayville/Pinewald.......will they be putting historic markers in or will the fact that the land was a railroad be ignored?
There will be a large amount of historic markers along the path. The logo is a tribute to the CNJ.

Image
I bet that fewer than 1% of trail users will realize the CNJ relevance of the logo on the sign. Needs to have the railroad lettering added.
  by JRWarrick
 
radioboy wrote:
GSC wrote:I've often wondered why CNJ and PRR built their stations an inconvenient distance from each other. Passengers must have needed to transfer sometimes. Toms River and Freehold and Manasquan come to mind, a few block hike from one to the other, although Farmingdale had a joint CNJ-PRR "union" station right at the diamond crossing. Whitings had a "union" station as well, CNJ-PRR-Tuckerton RR.
The PRR crossed the CNJ Main at Whiting, and then crossed the Barnegat Branch at Beachwood. But at the same time, remember that we're talking maybe a maximum of 5 trains per day. There probably weren't too many people coming down from Jersey City, switching to a Doodlebug or motorcoach on the Barnegat Branch, and then taking the PRR over to Seaside.

After the Beachwood stop opened in 1915, the town didn't take off as a summer resort. The station was eventually built by the township because neither railroad wanted to spend the money on it.
Perhaps they took the NY&LB to Bay head and transferred or continued on via Seaside as the train was heading for Mount Holly & Camden?
  by radioboy
 
JRWarrick wrote: Perhaps they took the NY&LB to Bay head and transferred or continued on via Seaside as the train was heading for Mount Holly & Camden?
Certainly a possibility.

To show my previous point, here's a Long Branch - Philadelphia timetable. Only 3 trains per day ran through from Long Branch, and 3 from Browns Mills. Regular hourly service started waaaaay out in Birmingham, near Mt. Holly.

The CNJ had only a few trains a day to Ocean County as well, and alternated with Motor Coaches.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 9