• typical passenger consist for a workaday DL109

  • Discussion relating to the NH and its subsidiaries (NYW&B, Union Freight Railroad, Connecticut Company, steamship lines, etc.). up until its 1969 inclusion into the Penn Central merger. This forum is also for the discussion of efforts to preserve former New Haven equipment, artifacts and its history. You may also wish to visit www.nhrhta.org for more information.
Discussion relating to the NH and its subsidiaries (NYW&B, Union Freight Railroad, Connecticut Company, steamship lines, etc.). up until its 1969 inclusion into the Penn Central merger. This forum is also for the discussion of efforts to preserve former New Haven equipment, artifacts and its history. You may also wish to visit www.nhrhta.org for more information.
  by lenny2124
 
I just ran into an opportunity to aquire two powered New Haven DL109 A-units in the older New York, New Haven & Hartford paint scheme and was wondering what the typical makeup of a typical passenger train might be, say for a train that originated south of DC and was picked up by the New Haven at Penn Station and by the DL109's at New Haven.

I am thinking majority NH equipment with PRR & REA second followed by baggage cars from 1 or more of the following, C&O, B&O, RF&P, SOU, ACL, SAL, etc.

thanks for any input

Lenny Hendricks
  by Statkowski
 
When the DL-109s were running Main Line trains, the only train that originated south of D.C. would have been the Vacationer (nos. 116/117). which carried no head-end cars. This train had a few ACL cars (including a diner), with the rest being Pullman heavyweight sleepers of assorted designs.

Daytime trains between New Haven and Boston were relatively light on head-end cars, perhaps one or two baggage/express/express messenger. The heavy head-end traffic was at night.

One such train, eastward, was No. 164, a daily Railway Express train. Cars for it originated in Chicago, Ill., St. Louis, Mo., Pittsburgh, Pa., Cincinnati, Oh., Penn. Station, N.Y., Newark, N.J., Philadelphia, Pa., Baltimore, Md., Harlem River, N.Y. and Washington, D.C. Destinations for such cars were Boston, Mass., New London, Conn., Springfield, Mass., New Haven, Conn. and Providence, R.I. Cars were classified as either Express (which could have been either a baggage car or a passenger-equipped railroad boxcar or REA boxcar), Storage (which could have been either a baggage car or a passenger-equipped railroad boxcar) or Express Messenger (which could have been a baggage car with a star on it). Whose baggage cars or passenger-equipped railroad boxcars? Take your pick. AT&SF baggage cars showed up in South Station, Boston in REA service, and NYNH&H baggage cars showed up in Los Angeles Union Station, Calif. Southern and ACL baggage cars showed up quite regularly in the 1960s. PRR baggage cars showed up in Grand Central Terminal, N.Y., and NYC cars were liable to show up in Penn. Station, N.Y.

Both C&O and B&O cars theoretically could show up, but I believe such would be rare indeed. RF&P cars would be rare since such cars, if they existed, were rare. As for SOU, ACL, SAL and FEC, the traffic between Boston, Mass. and Miami, Fla. was considerable.

Oh, the Railway Express trains would generally have either a PRR passenger-equipped N5a or N5c cabin car, or a New Haven passenger-equipped NE-6 hack on the rear.
  by Noel Weaver
 
During the New Haven Rairoad days not too many cars from the south ran on the NHRR. The reason was that they were equipped with soft springs and clearances on the New Haven did not allow for operation of these cars. There were a few cars that did no have soft springs and they could run east out of New York and I think all of the head end cars were also OK to run on the New Haven. Heavyweight Pullmans were also cleared at least most if not all of them were and were quite common on the New Haven while they were still in use.
I believe all of the restrictions were between New York and New Haven and when Metro-North got the M-2's and Amtrak showed up much work took place to get rid of the restrictions, this resulted in us seeing a lot of coaches from the Seaboard Coast Line, Southern and others running to Boston. The worst spot was Jenkins Curve on tracks one and three.
Noel Weaver
  by livesteamer
 
You could also model the Old Colony commuter service with a back-to-back set of DL109s and about half dozen so called "American Flyer" coaches.