• Tractive effort on AC locos

  • Discussion of General Electric locomotive technology. Current official information can be found here: www.getransportation.com.
Discussion of General Electric locomotive technology. Current official information can be found here: www.getransportation.com.

Moderators: AMTK84, MEC407

  by dash7
 
hi ,i was wondering if anyone has any info on the ac4400cw and evo series ac model tractive effort figures?,as i went to the ge transportation website and the info available was limited to say the least!,if anyone could help me out i really appreciate it ,peace out,dash7

  by Allen Hazen
 
Back in 1993, when the very first Dash-9 units (built for Chicago & Northwestern) were new and the onlly AC44 in existence was GE's prototype, it was announced that a Dash-9 (with 40 inch wheels and 83:20 gear ratio) had a continuous tractive effort of 109,000 pounds, that a Dash-9 with the high-adhesion option (42 inch wheels and 90:19 gear ratio) had a rating of 118,000 pounds, and that an AC44 (with 42 inch wheels and an 87:16 gwear ratio on its GEB 13 alternating current motors) had a continuous rating of 145,000 pounds.

  by dash7
 
thanks for that guys, i am trying to compare ac44cw t/e with the aussie c40aci model used here in northern new south wales dedicated coal lines as their weight as you probably already know is simular to the US domestic models at around 180 tonnes (396,000 lbs),also i think its a shame that we could'nt just order off the shelf dash 9s due to our loading gauge contsraints which only allow a max height of 14'. still, they are an awsome sight when they are notching up a coal drag!.cheers dash7 :-D

  by Allen Hazen
 
Dash-7--
Please let us know if you find out specific numbers about c40aci performance!

Comments:
A: The highest tractive efforts quoted are for CSX "heavyweight" locomotives with a mass another 10% higher than the 180tonnes you quote. (I think they are 436,000 pounds.)

B: Thank heavens a kilogram is as close to 2.2 pounds as it is! It keeps the arithmetic of conversion between metric and American reasonably simple (1 metric tonne = 1.1 American (short) tons). ... Do you know off the top of your head the conversion factor between pounds (as a unit of force) and Newtons?

  by dash7
 
Allen, a good formula to convert kilonewtons to force pounds is multiplying the k/n by 225,as say the qrnational C40aci
Continuous Tractive Effort is 586kN @ 18km/h (11.25mph) which when caculated ends up at 131,850 lbs and starting t/e is 759kn @ 30% adhesion is 170,775 lbs i am sort of answering 2 questions at once here!oh i found a good link for more data on these locos athttp://www.qrig.org/motive-power/nrr-in ... 5000-class cheers dash7 :-D

  by timz
 
Far as I know the pound is still defined as the standard-gravitation force on 0.45359237 kg exactly, where standard gravitational accel is 9.80665 meters per second-squared exactly. So pounds-to-Newtons is the latter times the former.

  by Allen Hazen
 
dash-7 and timz:
Thanks both! I was just too lazy to look up the conversion factor myself!
Looking very briefly at the WWWebsite you linked to, dash-7, I note that the QR 5000 does use the same traction motors (GEB-13) as Stateside AC-44 and ES-44AC. So its high-speed performance ought to be similar to that of one of the North American units running at 10/11 full power (4000hp, like the Norfolk Southern's Dash-9 and ES-44DC), and its low-speed performance should be comparable to ... a CSX unit that has lost 10% of its adhesion weight.

  by dash7
 
thanks Allen,of note i was wondering if you were interested in the hamersley iron/goninan dash-9-44cw brochure that hamersley iron's chief mechanical engineer brian white sent me in 1998 he gave me two! if you want one.on yet another note at 38 yo i have tried to collect drawings,blue prints and other locomotive stuff that i have collected for about 25 years and i have put each manufacturer (american and australian and even european ) in seperate folders in sheet protectors and try to put them in chronological order to make what i call my bibles ( yes my wife does cringe at me!)and they are emd,ge, clyde,emd export and european to elaberate!, anyway sorry for boring anyone reading this blog!that is sort of why i wanted to know the t/e figures on the domestic ge ac's. thanks dash7

  by CN5789
 
Allen Hazen wrote:Dash-7--
Please let us know if you find out specific numbers about c40aci performance!

Comments:
A: The highest tractive efforts quoted are for CSX "heavyweight" locomotives with a mass another 10% higher than the 180tonnes you quote. (I think they are 436,000 pounds.)

B: Thank heavens a kilogram is as close to 2.2 pounds as it is! It keeps the arithmetic of conversion between metric and American reasonably simple (1 metric tonne = 1.1 American (short) tons). ... Do you know off the top of your head the conversion factor between pounds (as a unit of force) and Newtons?
1lb. = 4.4482216 Newtons. for example 200,000 lbs of STE = (if you round up) 890Kn. You multiply lbs. by 4.4482216 Newtons to get the metric rating. You would divide your Kilo-newton rating by 4.4482216 to get lbs. i.e. 675 Kn =151,746.03 lbs.