• The Railways of West Wales - Pembrokeshire

  • Discussion about railroad topics everywhere outside of North America.
Discussion about railroad topics everywhere outside of North America.

Moderators: Komachi, David Benton

  by rogerfarnworth
 
In the early Autumn of 2022, we had a two week holiday in West Wales and I took the opportunity to have a look at a number of old railways. I walked lengths of some and spent hours whiling away the time looking at old photos. This thread is the result and this is the first article which looks at transport prior to the railway age, with a significant focus on tramways/tramroads .....
http://rogerfarnworth.com/2022/09/13/ra ... ilway-age/
Elsewhere in the UK, a usual pattern of development was for river traffic to be supplemented by tramroads and canals which then, often when traffic warranted it, were replaced by railways. It did not exactly work out like that in Pembrokeshire. ... We start with a quick look at the history of industrial transport of the County before the railways. ...
  by Gilbert B Norman
 
Reverend, your topic regarding historical railroads in Wales prompted me to think of this video of Her Majesty's train that was taken in Cardiff. I am surprised that the Royal Train was not part of The Queen's final journey from Balmoral to London. Such a movement would have enabled many more of her Subjects to view her final journey than did the motorcade from Balmoral to Edinburgh.

Finally, WAAAY off topic, this Yank is at a loss as to why the hymn "Jerusalem" was not part of her Service escapes me.
  by rogerfarnworth
 
Royal Train a great idea. I guess Jerusalem did not quite make the cut, there were so many things linking with different parts of her life and with the Abbey. Thanks for getting in touch.
  by rogerfarnworth
 
This next linked post (which for some reason has an abnormal URL) begins a short series of articles covering the industrial railways of Pembrokeshire. So far, I have identified a number of industrial lines including:

• The Saundersfoot Railway (covered in a later article)

• The Milford Haven Docks Railways

• The Milford & St. Bride's Bay Light Railway and proposals for expansion of the Docks at Milford Haven

• The Royal Navy Armaments Depot at Newton Noyes (RNMD Milford Haven)

• The Royal Navy Armaments Depot at Trecwn (RNAD Trecwn) (covered in a later article)

• Milford Haven Oil Refineries

• The Freystrop Colliery Railway.

• The Hook Colliery Railway.

Those in the immediate vicinity of Milford Haven are reviewed in the linked article below:

http://rogerfarnworth.com/2022/09/20/__trashed-3/

1. Milford Haven Docks Railways

In 1790 an Act of Parliament granted William Hamilton permission to: 'make and provide Quays, Docks, Piers and other erections and establish a Market with proper Roads and Avenues'. Several plans were proposed for the construction of quays, piers and all weather docks in the first half of the 19th century, but nothing was done. In an attempt of kick start the town to life the Milford Improvement Bill of 1857 led to the construction of a pier and two wooden bridges: Black Bridge and Hakin Bridge, both now replaced by modern structures. [51]

Once construction of the Milford Junction Railway was completed in 1863, further work became essential to the docks. This was completed in the early 1870s and more railway track was laid towards the docks complex in 1875. A spur to Newton Noyes, known as the 'Estate Line', was completed in 1882. It connected with a cast-iron pier, which was reached via a lifting bridge at Castle Pill; the junction with the Milford line was opposite the station. [53]

The docks were finally opened in 1888, with dry-dock facilities in Castle Pill. The docks were intended for the transatlantic passenger trade, but were only very sparsely used for this purpose. [51]