• Square blades and drawbridges

  • Discussion relating to the NH and its subsidiaries (NYW&B, Union Freight Railroad, Connecticut Company, steamship lines, etc.). up until its 1969 inclusion into the Penn Central merger. This forum is also for the discussion of efforts to preserve former New Haven equipment, artifacts and its history. You may also wish to visit www.nhrhta.org for more information.
Discussion relating to the NH and its subsidiaries (NYW&B, Union Freight Railroad, Connecticut Company, steamship lines, etc.). up until its 1969 inclusion into the Penn Central merger. This forum is also for the discussion of efforts to preserve former New Haven equipment, artifacts and its history. You may also wish to visit www.nhrhta.org for more information.
  by ExCon90
 
Most railroads used square-end blades on controlled home signals protecting interlockings, but New Haven rulebooks indicate that round-end blades were used for this purpose, with square-end blades reserved for signals protecting movable bridges. Obviously the practice went back to well before anyone alive today was born; does anyone know why this distinction was observed? Either type blade means stop and do not proceed without specific permission.
  by Statkowski
 
With multiple movable bridges on the line from New York to Boston, apparently they felt the distinction was necessary. Many railroads larger than the New Haven had far fewer movable bridges.
  by Ridgefielder
 
Did any other railroad have nearly as many moveable bridges as the NYNH&H? I count twelve between Boston South and NY on the Shore Line (including the Harlem River branch) alone, and I know there were more elsewhere in the sytem.
  by Rick Abramson
 
Keep in mind that by virtue of its geographical location by harbors and rivers, its no surprise that the NH had so many drawbridges. As info, the PRR had 2 major drawbridges between NY and Newark; Portal Draw over the Hackensack River and Dock Bridge over the Passaic River in Newark.
  by Statkowski
 
Just to add to the count, Little Hell Gate on the New York Connecting Railroad was designed as a movable bridge. It was never used as one, but.......