• Siemens Single Level Cars for CA/IL/Midwest

  • Discussion related to Amtrak also known as the National Railroad Passenger Corp.
Discussion related to Amtrak also known as the National Railroad Passenger Corp.

Moderators: GirlOnTheTrain, mtuandrew, Tadman

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  by Ridgefielder
 
rohr turbo wrote: Fri Feb 12, 2021 4:55 pm
Ridgefielder wrote: Fri Feb 12, 2021 2:43 pm ...there are plenty of Boeing 737's and such from the 1970's that are still flying.
Actually no 1970s era 737s have flown in US scheduled passenger service since 2008 (Wiki). Possibly a handful might still be flying in 3rd world countries. Mechanical systems eventually wear out and need replacement, especially if passenger lives are at stake.
My general point is that stuff like rolling stock or airliners has a multi-decade lifespan in the private sector, too-- Amfleets wouldn't have been replaced 2x over since 1975 even if they were owned by, say, Kansas City Southern.

As for public sector well... ponder the B-52. :-)
  by eolesen
 
Ridgefielder wrote:
eolesen wrote: Thu Jan 28, 2021 2:04 am Sure, it's a testament to Budd, but private industry would have already replaced their equipment at least twice since 1971...
I'm not too sure about that. To look away from the rails for a moment-- there are plenty of Boeing 737's and such from the 1970's that are still flying.
Uh, no. Pressurization cycles their toll on aluminum over time, and airplanes with over 50,000 cycles get painfully expensive to maintain.

Not too many 40+ year old jets still flying... even Travolta's 707 has been grounded for the past four years.

Anything built before 1985 is likely not going to be Stage 3 noise reg compliant and there are perfectly good 25 year old airplanes available for less than the cost of reengining a tapped out airframe.

Comparing that to a railcar... the wear and tear from being in service seems to be pretty much limited to the draft gear, wheelsets and brakes.

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  by eolesen
 
Your B52 example is unique. High hours indeed but very low cycles relative to age because they didn't fly daily let alone 3-5 flights a day.

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  by David Benton
 
Plus manufacterers are getting better at matching the lifespan of components to the lifespan of the vehicle. So when a vehicle hits its 15 - 20 year end of life , most components are worn out .
  by Pensyfan19
 
Eight single level coaches spotted behind a UP GEVO recently.
Image
  by west point
 
Is Siemens meeting promised deliveries ? Have to wonder if the world wide shortage of computer chips will cause delays either now or in the future ?
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