• Shawmut to Macedon, Naples, Lima

  • Pertaining to all railroading subjects, past and present, in New York State.
Pertaining to all railroading subjects, past and present, in New York State.

Moderator: Otto Vondrak

  by CHECKIT
 
Scanning west on the (DL&W main?) on the mapping web site Matt mentioned, well West of Rt.15, I see what appears to be a wye. Anyone aware of what this wye was built to support? I know the DLW had helpers for Dansville Hill, but it would almost seem that like a wye for shoving wetbounds would be much further west. Did they shove eastbound as well? If so where were eastbound helpers put on? Or for that matter, in general what were their normal locations for helpers on and off?
Thanks for any info.
  by tjdean
 
CHECKIT wrote:Scanning west on the (DL&W main?) on the mapping web site Matt mentioned, well West of Rt.15, I see what appears to be a wye. Anyone aware of what this wye was built to support? I know the DLW had helpers for Dansville Hill, but it would almost seem that like a wye for shoving wetbounds would be much further west. Did they shove eastbound as well? If so where were eastbound helpers put on? Or for that matter, in general what were their normal locations for helpers on and off?
Thanks for any info.
From the link below this 1904 map doesn't show any wye evident but there is a siding off the DL&W going to the marl beds which was used in making cement. The Millen Cement Works in Wayland used this marl & was served by what was called the Wayland Beltine which you will see proceeding north where it also connected with the Erie Rochester division. Millen was in operation from 1892-1912. After the demise of the cement works the northern end of the beltline became a siding off the Erie which served Rogers & Tenbrook lumber yard and a Sinclair oil distributor.
http://docs.unh.edu/NY/wayl04se.jpg
  by CHECKIT
 
Searching this a bit more, I see that there have been previous threads in this forum discussing this wye. The wye i noticed is actually just east of Perkinsville. You may be correct in its relationship to marl(?) movements, but there is also discussion that it may have been narrow gauge? It all sounds pretty interesting. If someone can elaborate even more it would be greatly appreciated!
  by joshuahouse
 
I'm not sure where the idea that there had been narrow gauge railroads in that area came from but I've not heard of them. Perhaps this "belt railroad" was, but what little information I can find online about it doesn't indicate that. The original B&H was of course, but that had been standardized in 1889 and isn't particularly near Wayland. In fact the only reference I can find suggesting a narrow gauge operation in the Wayland area is the 2005 posting that you found here (and now this thread as well of course).
  by SST
 
Well, the search function really worked this time. I was walking the gorge of the Stony Brook State park and came upon the concrete pylons. I have never researched this area and therefore never new this was here. I assumed that they were for a RR bridge but they were oddly placed. I assumed it was one bridge but as I climbed the stairs I figured it out to be two bridges. Two main concrete abutments remain on the west side. There were several stone cut support blocks for each bridge going into the gorge. I spotted one or two on the other side. This just seemed an odd location.

When I left the lower gorge area, I drove up to the camp area. I saw two street signs. One said something like Shawmut St. Another sign said Pittsburg Highway. I started to wonder if this was the PS&N. So when I got home, I started looking things up. Google mapped first and only could see the main abutment in the middle of the gorge and a dirt streak in the farmers field that indicates something was there. Then I went to open street maps. Nothing listed there. I went to ACME Mapper 2 and clicked on toppo. Bingo...."old railroad grade." Click on this link where I put the markers. It went whacko on me and they are all screwed up but you can follow the ROW all the way from Rt36[dirt streak] to the 390. http://mapper.acme.com/?ll=42.51102,-77 ... ville%20NY" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

I then searched this forum and came upon this post so I was happy to see what it was. It is heavily forested with trees about 50+ years old. Neat to find.
  by SST
 
It appears in this photo that there is only one bridge:
https://encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com/imag ... -3uBs5ENtm" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

But in this picture, there looks like one constructed and one either being torn down or being constructed:
http://bridgehunter.com/photos/23/66/236653-L.jpg" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
  by BR&P
 
Find yourself a copy of Pietrak's book on the PS&N and your questions will be answered, your doubts erased, your curiosity whetted and your interest rewarded! :-D
  by rhallock
 
Last summer I walked the gorge trail and saw the two sets of bridge piers. To satisfy my interest, I went to the east side of the gorge and walked in on the old grade, locations B to F on the topo map. Before long the grade split into two distinct lines approaching the gorge, each having large fills, corresponding to the two sets of piers.
  by s4ny
 
There were two bridges in 1909. The original bridge was replaced and then
torn down. There are pictures of the two bridges standing side by side.
They were both higher than the Erie bridge at Portageville by a few feet.

The Shawmut and the DL&W both had wyes just east of Perkinsville.
They are shown on topo maps from the early 1940s.
There is a film clip from the 1950's (train of the future?) and you can see the DL&W wye
on the left side of the train as it goes between Perkinsville and Wayland. By
1960 that wye was gone.

The Shawmut terminated at the Wayland DL&W station.
The last 1.2 miles belonged to the DL&W. In the early
1960s that track was still used by the DL&W and was protected
by signals.
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
  by s4ny
 
Presumably this monster did not use the bridges.
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
  by BR&P
 
"The Curve Straightener" was used mostly as a pusher on the south end, according to Pietrak. It was not successful on the Shawmut's light rails and was stored and then scrapped.
  by RussNelson
 
SST wrote:Then I went to open street map. Nothing listed there.
Unfortunately, they stopped rendering abandoned railroads on the main map a few years ago (I was not happy, but was told "So? Go render your own railroad-centric map."). You have to go to OpenRailwayMap.org to see them now. I have all four abutments and both bridges in OSM.
  by trwinship
 
An interesting thread! One more question! It's always been said that the Ghost City of Valentown (in Victor/Fishers) was built in anticipation of the Shawmut building to Fishers. Was there ever any actual prospect of that, or just wishful thinking?