• SEPTA NPT card will be "SEPTA Key"?

  • Discussion relating to Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority (Philadelphia Metro Area). Official web site can be found here: www.septa.com. Also including discussion related to the PATCO Speedline rapid transit operated by Delaware River Port Authority. Official web site can be found here: http://www.ridepatco.org/.
Discussion relating to Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority (Philadelphia Metro Area). Official web site can be found here: www.septa.com. Also including discussion related to the PATCO Speedline rapid transit operated by Delaware River Port Authority. Official web site can be found here: http://www.ridepatco.org/.

Moderator: AlexC

  by rcthompson04
 
ExCon90 wrote: Tue Jan 04, 2022 11:12 pm As it is there's not nearly as much connectivity between Regional Rail and the trolleys, busses, and subways as there should be, and creating two rival turfs (they would inevitably see each other as rivals) would make things worse instead of better. Individual passengers don't think of themselves as being in one camp or the other; they think of their transportation needs for a particular trip. Cutting loose from the archaic fare structure of the 1940's (the PRR and RDG no longer compete with PTC -- the Philadelphia one -- and Red Arrow and P&W) would help to make SEPTA the unified area-wide transportation system it was intended to be. Trying to distinguish between regional rail and the rest would tend to solidify the (poor) city-vs.-(rich) suburban mindset which already exists in today's political climate.
Are they really even capable of being rivals? There is occasional overlaps in service, but most are servicing different clientele going different places. Trying to force an integration isn't helping either. SEPTA has been trying to force integration for 4 decades now. At a certain point we have to admit it isn't the right strategy. Key highlights it further.
  by JeffK
 
This story about New Orleans RTA is interesting. Per-passenger revenue actually remained stable under a pilot program that reduced and adjusted fares. No explanation given but conceivably more people may be riding and/or riding more often - ?

It also says that the next phase will eliminate charges for transfers and premium-service routes.

https://www.masstransitmag.com/technolo ... -structure

I can hear it now: "But, but ... Philadelphia is different."

Re fare integration, I wonder how much of the "different usage, different clientele" between transit and RRD is caused by the separate fare structures rather than the other way around. Obviously the economic landscape of Glenside or Devon will be way different from Fern Rock or Torresdale, but it's not clear to me whether some of the economic segregation of usage patterns might be lower if one mode didn't cost nearly twice as much as the other. If nothing else, would more people maybe use the RRD for at least parts of their trips, then transfer to transit? The BSL / C bus anomaly showed how additional fares distorted ridership just within the transit division so this isn't a purely hypothetical question.
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