• Rain and no sanders

  • General discussion about railroad operations, related facilities, maps, and other resources.
General discussion about railroad operations, related facilities, maps, and other resources.

Moderator: Robert Paniagua

  by txbritt
 
Ran an SW-1500 lastnight in a plant in Houston with no operable sanders, and in heavy rain. Moving 5 or 6 cars around wasn't a problem, but at the end of the night I was having a problem getting 30 loads up a slight grade. The profile starts out level, with a grade increase, while traversing through several switches and a gradual S-curve. Can you feather in the independants as to inhibit wheelslip? I tried this, but the ammeter swung way over in the red as far down as run 4. The locomotive has comp shoes, with 45 lbs full application. Obviously I wasn't trying to move with the brakes fully applied. We ended up cutting the train in half, and shoving the outbound in two sections.

I'm open to all suggestions, I'll chalk it all up to internet based locomotive training :)

TxBritt

  by GOLDEN-ARM
 
Although frowned upon by managers, and some AB&TH books, you can run against the brakes, up to a full application. I use this technique to haul tonnage over the tops of grades, when running at speeds well under 10 mph, when any other attempts to summit, would end in failure. Sure, the shoes will get hot, and sometimes the treads, but if you don't do it for extended periods, it's okay. Sometimes, a high speed wheelslip, when running under under power, can also be controlled, with the feathering of the jimmie. Be sure you are experiencing slip, or creep, and don't actually have a sliding wheel, or locked axle, though :-D It's interesting to note, when it first starts raining, the rails get slippery as hell, with the oils and dirt being floated on the first bit of moisture to contact the rails. After a bit of steady rain, the water will actually "wash" the rails, and traction problems tend to go away. You might get a little slippage, at ultra low speeds, and excessive amp loads, but you will get this on dry rails as well, but the WS system can correct it faster on dry rail, due to the nature of dry friction, verses lubricated, or wet friction. A light amount of independent (10-12#, or so) will keep the treads cleaned, and somewhat dry, as well, aiding in temporarilly assisting traction. Practice makes perfect, so don't be afraid to try, and always "lighten-up" when stopping, to avoid sliding, and flatting, the wheels. Regards :wink:

  by LCJ
 
Wow, G-A. Great advice. Such a pro!

  by GOLDEN-ARM
 
I can't take any credit here, I was schooled by the MASTERS :-D :-D (hint....hint :wink: )

  by txbritt
 
Appreciate the advice Golden-arm. I worked that job tonight, and tried feathering a little brake in while starting. It was really humid with alot of moisture on the rail and it helped tremendously. Still stumbled once or twice, but it wasn't as drastic as before. Made it up the hill with 29 loads ( 3625 tons ) thats 2.4 hp/ton.

Thanks!

TxBritt