• People injured after Sydney train crash

  • Discussion about railroad topics everywhere outside of North America.
Discussion about railroad topics everywhere outside of North America.

Moderators: Komachi, David Benton

  by David Benton
 
I guess I am perpetuating the problem by posting this, but I am amzed this makes front page news in New Zealand.
http://www.nzherald.co.nz/world/news/ar ... d=11979655" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;.
"Multiple injuries have been reported following a train crash in Sydney's north west on Monday morning".
Meanwhile, around 30 people die per month on the roads in New South Wales, This does not make the news here.
  by george matthews
 
Nine News has reported that the train failed to break, hit the buffers and obstacles at the end of the track and then lurched backwards leading passengers, who readying to disembark, to fall and injure themselves.
Bad mark for spelling, there.
  by David Benton
 
Its holiday season here, George, most senior reporters will be taking 3 or 4 weeks holiday. The junior reporters get their chance to shine, leading to some bizarre headlines, and stories. They obviously also rely on computer spell check to much too.
  by george matthews
 
David Benton wrote:Its holiday season here, George, most senior reporters will be taking 3 or 4 weeks holiday. The junior reporters get their chance to shine, leading to some bizarre headlines, and stories. They obviously also rely on computer spell check to much too.
Would it be worth installing automatic equipment to slow all trains entering a dead end platform?
  by ExCon90
 
That would depend on whether the train's brakes failed--better to wait for the results of the investigation. (Will the results even be reported in the newspapaers? The blood will have stopped flowing long before then, and it'll be old news.)

I think some of that was installed in Britain some time ago, but I don't know the details. I think I remember reading of complaints that it slowed the trains down to a crawl and delayed operations.
  by ExCon90
 
David Benton wrote:I guess I am perpetuating the problem by posting this, but I am amzed this makes front page news in New Zealand.
http://www.nzherald.co.nz/world/news/ar ... d=11979655" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;.
"Multiple injuries have been reported following a train crash in Sydney's north west on Monday morning".
Meanwhile, around 30 people die per month on the roads in New South Wales, This does not make the news here.
I think it reflects the fact that only something unusual is considered newsworthy; thus, daily road accidents aren't news but rare train crashes are, simply because they're rare. Discouraging ...
  by David Benton
 
Another system has the train come to a stop before the platform , then move slowly in.
It all adds time , to prevent a fairly rear occurrence , that doesn't result in many injuries.
Mind you , there was a nasty one in Argentina , but that was a train hitting another one already sitting at the platform.
  by george matthews
 
ExCon90 wrote:That would depend on whether the train's brakes failed--better to wait for the results of the investigation. (Will the results even be reported in the newspapaers? The blood will have stopped flowing long before then, and it'll be old news.)

I think some of that was installed in Britain some time ago, but I don't know the details. I think I remember reading of complaints that it slowed the trains down to a crawl and delayed operations.
In 1975 there was a shocking crash on the Tube line at Moorgate when an Underground train crashed into the end of the line in the station, and got jammed into the tube at the end of the platform. That raised the question of automatic slowing down. The line has since been converted to non-tube stock and was made part of British Rail. I am not sure what arrangements the BR suburban trains have to prevent end-of-track accidents.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moorgate_tube_crash" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

http://www.subbrit.org.uk/sb-sites/site ... ndex.shtml" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
  by MACTRAXX
 
Everyone:

I searched for some more information about this Sydney Trains accident - will there be anyone conducting an investigation of the type that the U.S. NTSB does to find the cause?

Luckily there were few seriously injured - nothing worse - and damage to the Waratah trainset
looks to be repairable from the pictures that I saw of the wreck scene. The bumper block of solid
concrete did forceably what it was designed to do to prevent perhaps an even worse outcome.

If anyone is unaware Sydney Trains posts interesting fact sheets about their rail fleet here:
http://www.sydneytrains.info/about/fleet/a_sets" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
The Waratah trainsets - which are the newest in the Sydney Trains EMU fleet.

MACTRAXX
  by David Benton
 
MACTRAXX, it appears there is a rail safety board , under the Australian transport safety bureau . looks like they take 2 years plus to publish their reports ! I am at a loss as to how these reports take so long, especially into minor accidents. https://www.atsb.gov.au/publications/sa ... ?mode=Rail" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
  by RRspatch
 
David Benton wrote:MACTRAXX, it appears there is a rail safety board , under the Australian transport safety bureau . looks like they take 2 years plus to publish their reports ! I am at a loss as to how these reports take so long, especially into minor accidents. https://www.atsb.gov.au/publications/sa ... ?mode=Rail" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
There's a thread about this incident over at Railpage Australia about the derailment and how long it takes ATSB to issue a report -

https://www.railpage.com.au/f-t11396970-s25.htm" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Railpage is the Australian version of Railroad.net