Discussion relating to the PRR, up to 1968. Visit the PRR Technical & Historical Society for more information.
  by [email protected]
 
In the Pennsy's heyday, how was Penn Station opperated? The platforms are of various configurations and their occompaning tracks lead to different locations and have access to certain yards and tunnels. And on a similar note, I have always had trouble lining up how the concourses used to be and how they are aligned today. I know some were added, could someone enlighten me on the evolution of the concourses and waiting rooms?

[email protected]

  by westernfalls
 
Pennsylvania Station in New York City has been a work in progress for almost one hundred years. Many books and articles have been published over the years with details of its construction and modifications.
Did you have a particular year in mind?

  by [email protected]
 
Some time after mainline electrification but before the war. And then right before they tore it down in the 60's

[email protected]

  by motor
 
For an overview of Penn Station, I highly recommend The Late, Great Pennsylvania Station by Lorraine Diehl. (Hardbound: American Heritage Press, 1985; softbound: Four Walls Eight Windows, 1996.) Chapter 1 is about the effort to rescue Penn in the early '60s, and Chapter 15 is about how PRR came to the decision to tear it down. In between are pictures and descriptions of its construction and history.

On page 143 is a picture of the long, airport-like state of the art ticket counter installed in the waiting room in 1956. Not only did it block off direct access to the concourse (you had to walk around either end of the behemoth), but Ms. Diehl likens it to "an ugly saw-toothed clamshell". The book also has pictures of the glass-doored stores that were retrofitted into the corridors as PRR turned to Penn for revenue sources beginning in the '50s.

I would have liked to see Penn in all its Romanesque glory. :( But I missed out on it. I only got to see the, er, transformed version of Penn, which I've caught subways from and to which I took AMTK from PHL in 1973.

motor
  by workextra
 
Was steam locomotives permitted in the original station in 1910?
I heard roomers about the Lindberg engine E6 #460 pulling into NY Penn, Is this true?
I would think that because of the long tunnels that steam locomotives would not be permitted anywhere near Penn.
  by Otto Vondrak
 
workextra wrote:Were steam locomotives permitted in the original station in 1910?
Doubtful. The only access to Penn Station then was via the East River Tunnels from Long Island, or the Hudson River Tunnels from New Jersey. The original Penn Station was PRR's first entry into New York.
I would think that because of the long tunnels that steam locomotives would not be permitted anywhere near Penn.
My thoughts, too.

-otto-
  by JimBoylan
 
workextra wrote:I heard roomers about the Lindberg engine E6 #460 pulling into NY Penn, Is this true?
Many accounts of the race mention that the only stop was at Manhattan Transfer, for an engine change. But, about 1905, the station's builder was using steam locos in the construction pit.
  by R36 Combine Coach
 
When Penn Station was completed in 1910, DD1 third rail locomotives powered trains, changing at Manhattan Transfer. They were used until overhead electrication and GG1s were introduced in 1935.
  by cobra30689
 
I understand that there was open air above the platforms when the station was first opened, when the whole operation was third rail, but did the overbuild occur because of impending overhead electrification, or was there no tie between the two and it was done to add space?

Matt
  by timz
 
No connection to the electrification, except inside the station-- you remember you originally could look down on the tracks from the concourse, and I assume they covered that over when the catenary arrived.

NY Penn opened 1910-- all open air west of 9th Ave (i.e. most platforms were under roof)

Circa 1914, post office opened above the east half of the 8th-9th Ave block

Circa 1934, post office expanded to cover the rest of the 8th-9th Ave block

1957, Lincoln Tunnel north-south access ramp opens above tracks east of 10th Ave

Circa 1970? that yellow building covered the tracks west of the tunnel access ramp.

(I guess I misunderstood your question-- you're only asking about inside the station, aren't you? No, I've never seen exactly when and why they covered those open areas in the concourse. Anybody think why they would need extra space anytime before the catenary went in circa 1932?)