• Pan Am Southern / Patriot Corridor Discussion

  • Pan Am Southern (webssite: https://panamsouthern.com ) is jointly-owned by CSX and Norfolk Southern, but operated by Genesee & Wyoming subsidiary Pittsburg & Shawmut dba Berkshire and Eastern,
Pan Am Southern (webssite: https://panamsouthern.com ) is jointly-owned by CSX and Norfolk Southern, but operated by Genesee & Wyoming subsidiary Pittsburg & Shawmut dba Berkshire and Eastern,

Moderator: MEC407

  by bostontrainguy
 
taracer wrote: Thu Feb 29, 2024 5:35 pm They moved the WAS for CP-VO further east in between Main St. and Voorheesville Ave and placed the EAS signal on the NS connection at the clearance point for the switch on Track 2.
So the signal for NS is around the bend? Shouldn't it be before the crossing at the end of tangent track? That would create better sightlines and would keep the crossing clear. Just curious and questioning things out loud.
  by F74265A
 
Not clear to me how an EB ns train can hit the connector at the advertised 25 unless an approach signal is installed on the ns line a bit west of the connection curve
  by taracer
 
bostontrainguy wrote: Fri Mar 01, 2024 9:14 am
taracer wrote: Thu Feb 29, 2024 5:35 pm They moved the WAS for CP-VO further east in between Main St. and Voorheesville Ave and placed the EAS signal on the NS connection at the clearance point for the switch on Track 2.
So the signal for NS is around the bend? Shouldn't it be before the crossing at the end of tangent track? That would create better sightlines and would keep the crossing clear. Just curious and questioning things out loud.
It's right by the switch, next to that building the track runs alongside of. They have equipment to "sight" the signal alignment, so being in a curve is no problem. They use this whenever they install new signals, they don't just randomly place them.

Most likely they will have a hold point board west of Main St. on the NS side. Or the hold point may be where NS puts the distant signal on their line, which will likely be somewhere west of School St.
  by taracer
 
F74265A wrote: Fri Mar 01, 2024 10:57 am Not clear to me how an EB ns train can hit the connector at the advertised 25 unless an approach signal is installed on the ns line a bit west of the connection curve
Yes, NS will have to install a distant signal on their line. Just having an approach signal would make it so that every EB NS train would have to be prepared to stop at VO, I don't think they'll have it setup that way, since it kind of slows things down, but they could.

It will likely be a two headed signal at least, so it can display yellow over green, approach medium, which will be the best that can be displayed since the best signal NS can get at CP-VO will be red over steady green, medium clear for the 30 MPH switch. It is possible a three headed signal will be installed if they want the full range of Seaboard (aka CSX Standard) signals. This signal will likely be a couple of miles west of CP-VO on the NS line, so it's probably in a location that can't be seen.

Timetable will limit the actual max speed over the 30 MPH switch down to 25.
  by jamoldover
 
Whatever distant signal NS installs, it will probably be set up to use NS signal rules. CSX signal rules wouldn't be in effect until the train hits the CSX property line (which is probably right in front of where the interlocking signal is being placed). In addition, by keeping the division point east of the crossing, it means that NS is responsible for the crossing equipment and for maintaining the crossing , not CSX.
  by taracer
 
I disagree, the NS line is going to be non-signaled DCS territory on the NS side, aka track warrant or paper. The first signal the EB NS crews see will be an automatic signal tied in the CSX signal system at CP-VO. That signal will have to display CSX signals to the NS crews. They only other option is an approach signal, which as I said will mean every EB train will have to approach prepared to stop at CP-VO.

They can do it like that, but it is unlikely since it will just add a delay, and they are going to need to keep this junction fluid.

There will be a timetable instruction in the NS timetable for the branch that the distant signal is governed under CSX rule 12** . Possibly signs saying this at the signal as well.

The actual division point between CSX or NS may well be west of the CP, but the signal system will be set up for the MAS of 25 MPH, which means you can't just have an approach for the NS distant signal. It's not going to be a constant approach like on the port sub in Selkirk.
Last edited by taracer on Fri Mar 01, 2024 8:28 pm, edited 1 time in total.
  by ANDY117
 
Based on the signals I've seen laying around, the distant signal on the NS side is probably going to have 1 head with green and yellow lights that will be able to display Approach Restricting (yellow) and Approach Clear (green).
  by johnpbarlow
 
I did a CP-VO Voorheesville drive-by on Friday 3/8/24 and observed that NS-CSX connection turnout machine is installed along with the home signals (nothing active) and the NS Albany Main distant signal has been installed at Hennessey Rd Voorheesville 2 miles west of CP-VO in the middle of Black Creek Marsh.

Q: the Albany Main home signal at NS CP-499 Delanson appears to be an original GRS signal installed by D&H - will NS be swapping out this signal?
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  by johnpbarlow
 
And there also appears to be a new CP-499 distant signal being installed just east of the northbound I-88 overpass over the Albany main. I guess the old distant signal at Schoharie Turnpike will be retired?

Q: where will NS crew change point be for the. new IM trains routed via Voorheesville? Delanson siding or Cole Rd xing?
  by BlueFlag
 
Photo on CSX Albany Division Sightings Facebook page shows loaded NS ballast train approaching VO on restored track. A preview of photos to come.
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